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Women in Film oral history interview, 2006 October 13 : Marcia Nasatir Titelvorschau
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Women in Film oral history interview, 2006 October 13 : Marcia Nasatir

Verfasser/in: Marcia Nasatir; Ilene Kahn; Women in Film (Organization); Women in Film Foundation.
Ausgabe/Format   Kinofilm : Film   Bildmaterial : Englisch
Veröffentichung:Women in Film Foundation Legacy Series.
Datenbank:WorldCat
Zusammenfassung:
Marcia Nasatir (1926-) begins by recalling her childhood in San Antonio, Texas as the daughter of Russian immigrants. She continues with her love of reading, women who were her role models, such as Ginger Rogers (1911-1995) playing the lead character in Kitty Foyle (1940), and the women characterized in the works of Edna Ferber (1887-1968). She continues with the two years she spent at Northwestern University,  Weiterlesen…
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Gattung/Form: Oral history
Interviews
Name: Marcia Nasatir; Everett Ziegler; Mike Medavoy; Sylvester Stallone
Medientyp: Film
Dokumenttyp: Bildmaterial
Alle Autoren: Marcia Nasatir; Ilene Kahn; Women in Film (Organization); Women in Film Foundation.
OCLC-Nummer: 423641238
Anmerkungen: Interview completed under the auspices of the Women in Film Foundation.
Materials not viewed. Summary based on transcript.
Verfasserangabe: interviewer, Ilene Kahn Power.

Abstract:

Marcia Nasatir (1926-) begins by recalling her childhood in San Antonio, Texas as the daughter of Russian immigrants. She continues with her love of reading, women who were her role models, such as Ginger Rogers (1911-1995) playing the lead character in Kitty Foyle (1940), and the women characterized in the works of Edna Ferber (1887-1968). She continues with the two years she spent at Northwestern University, returning to Texas to live with her parents, spending a couple of semesters at the University of Texas, Austin, and then moving to New York City to marry her boyfriend, who was pursuing his Masters at Columbia. She continues with the lack of jobs available for women in the late 1940s, having children, and her divorce from her husband after six years of marriage. She continues with her life in New York City as a single mother, her first jobs working in advertising agencies and in the publishing industry, and the impact of Betty Friedan's The feminine mystique (1963) and how it empowered young women. She then discusses her innovation of starting the instant book craze with the publication of the Warren report on the Assassination of President John F. Kennedy soon after it was released in 1964, her involvement in the movie tie-in business, and her brief position as an editor for the Ladies home journal. She continues with her position as story editor at National General Pictures, being fired from that job, and then moving to Los Angeles, California in the summer of 1969 to work for Everett Ziegler, a literary agent who was representing Robert Towne, Lorenzo Semple, Sydney Pollack, and Roman Polanksi, whose wife, Sharon Tate, was murdered that August. She continues with the literary properties Ziegler represented, leaving Ziegler to work with Mike Medavoy (1941-) at United Artists, and her talent of recognizing literary properties that would make good movies. She continues with the director's training she received from the American Film Institute in the early 1970s, being the first woman at United Artists to become a vice-president, and the movies she and Mike Medavoy made including Rocky (1976), One flew over the cuckoo's nest (1975), and F.I.S.T. (1978). She continues with her experience working with Sylvester Stallone (1946-), making the film, Coming home (1978), with Jane Fonda (1937-), and winning three Academy Awards in a row for best picture. She then discusses the formation of Orion Pictures by Mike Medavoy and others and how she was told that she did not yet have enough experience to come on board as one of the partners. She continues with her deal with Mike Medavoy to work as an independent producer for Orion. She continues with leaving Orion to become her own producer, trying to get a project off the ground without backing by a studio, and being hired to work as a producer for the Johnny Carson Film Company. She continues with how she came across Lawrence Kasdan's script for The big chill (1983), getting the film made, and then moving back to New York City, making Hamburger Hill (1987) in the Philippines, Ironweed (1987), and then returning to Los Angeles. She continues with her role as executive producer on the film, Vertical limit (2000), turning 80 years of age in 2006, and her advice to young people trying to make it into the motion picture business.

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