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Women in Film oral history interview, 2007 October 25 : Elizabeth Gabler

Auteur : Elizabeth Gabler; Susan Cartsonis; Women in Film (Organization); Women in Film Foundation.
Édition/format :   Film : Film   Matériel visuel : Anglais
Publication :Women in Film Foundation Legacy Series.
Base de données :WorldCat
Résumé :
Elizabeth Gabler (1956-) discusses her idyllic childhood growing up in Long Beach, California, riding horses, maintaining academic excellence, and generating interest in many different activities. She continues with being the eldest of six children, setting a good example, and how that experience has translated over into her professional life as an executive managing people through difficult situations. She  Lire la suite...
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Détails

Genre/forme : Oral history
Interviews
Personne nommée : Elizabeth Gabler; Sean Connery; Tony Scott; Denzel Washington; Forest Whitaker; Whitney Houston; Angela Bassett; David Frankel; Meryl Streep; Anne Hathaway
Type d’ouvrage : Film
Format : Matériel visuel
Tous les auteurs / collaborateurs : Elizabeth Gabler; Susan Cartsonis; Women in Film (Organization); Women in Film Foundation.
Numéro OCLC : 423678744
Notes : 1.5-hour interview completed under the auspices of the Women in Film Foundation.
Materials not viewed. Length of interview and summary based on transcript.
Responsabilité : interviewer, Susan Cartsonis.

Résumé :

Elizabeth Gabler (1956-) discusses her idyllic childhood growing up in Long Beach, California, riding horses, maintaining academic excellence, and generating interest in many different activities. She continues with being the eldest of six children, setting a good example, and how that experience has translated over into her professional life as an executive managing people through difficult situations. She continues with opening a restaurant after college and its value in learning how a business operates. She continues with the three-and-a-half years she spent as an assistant at International Creative Agency (ICM), becoming a junior agent, and transitioning into a position at Columbia Pictures as a junior executive in 1983. She continues with her advice to young women that it is really about the work that matters and will be noticed, more so than who you know. She continues with the challenges of being an executive in a fast-paced environment that expects results quickly and her belief that just because a lot of people happen to get things done quickly doesn't necessarily mean the end product will be successful. She continues with her opinion that the shorter version of someone's career is not as essential as looking at the entire body of work over a long period of time that is essential in measuring success. She continues with examples of two big projects she worked on that took a number of years to make to the screen: MRS. DOUBTFIRE (1993) and CASTAWAY (2001). She continues with attending corporate meetings where she is the only woman in the room and gaining the studio's confidence and respect so that she is taken seriously. She continues with taking the position as President at Fox 2000 Pictures in 1999, coming into the organization during a time when the division needed to be re-organized and re-defined, and taking on that challenge one day at a time. She continues with her involvement in WALK THE LINE (2005), the difficulty of getting the film made, and keeping motivated when things were stacked against her. She continues with working with Sean Connery (1930-) on ENTRAPMENT (1999), Tony Scott (1944-) and Denzel Washington (1954-) on MAN ON FIRE (2004), and developing creative partnerships with directors. She continues with the challenge of making WAITING TO EXHALE (1995) and working with Forest Whitaker (1961-), Whitney Houston (1963-), and Angela Bassett (1958-). She continues with the steps it took to make THE DEVIL WEARS PRADA (2005), convincing David Frankel (1960-) to take on the project as director, and casting Meryl Streep (1949-) and Anne Hathaway (1982-) in the leading roles. She continues with projects that did not get made, particularly having to telephone Amy Heckerling (1954-) to inform her that her script for CLUELESS (1995) was being placed in turnaround because of the perception that there would not be an audience for it, only to have the script taken over by another studio and made into a success. She continues with her early career at Columbia Pictures that activated her interest in becoming a studio executive, what she enjoys about her current position, and ways in which her love of reading has influenced her interest in developing projects from books. She continues with the challenges of balancing a family with career and her opinion that it's not possible to have it all, so it's more important to be good at the thing that you are doing at the moment than to excel at everything. She continues with returning to her childhood passion of horseback riding as an outlet for managing stress, her love of animals, and her excitement in starting to shoot MARLEY & ME (2008), a story about a dog that inspires a couple to embrace life. She continues with her marriage to Lee Gabler (1940-) and her family life, her future goal to follow the example of Sherry Lansing (1944-) who has devoted her post-corporate life to philanthropy, and concluding with noting that her favorite film is GONE WITH THE WIND (1939).

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Données liées


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