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Women, love, and commodity culture in British romanticism

Author: Daniela Garofalo
Publisher: Farnham, Surrey, England ; Burlington, VT : Ashgate, ©2012.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Offering a new understanding of canonical Romanticism, Garofalo argues that Romantic writers critiqued the idea that erotic love enabled one to transcend political and economic realities. William Blake, Lord Byron, Sir Walter Scott, John Keats and Emily Brontë engaged with the period's concern with political economy and the nature of desire, challenging stereotypical representations of women consumers and  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Electronic books
Criticism, interpretation, etc
History
Additional Physical Format: Print version:
Garofalo, Daniela, 1968-
Women, love, and commodity culture in British romanticism.
Farnham, Surrey, England ; Burlington, VT : Ashgate, c2012
(DLC) 2011045500
(OCoLC)767824949
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Daniela Garofalo
ISBN: 9781409441021 1409441024
OCLC Number: 778376739
Description: 1 online resource (184 p.)
Contents: "The unfair sex" --
"The stock of love": unending desire in women's periodicals and in Letitia Landon's Improvisatrice --
"Take thy bliss": consumer culture and Oothoon's enjoyment in Blake's Visions of the daughters of Albion --
Beyond platonism: Byron's Don Juan and the critique of political economy --
"Give me that voice again, those looks immortal": gaze and voice in Keats's Eve of St Agnes --
Impossible things: Scott's Ivanhoe and the limits of exchange --
Impossible love and commodity culture in Emily Brontë's Wuthering heights.
Responsibility: Daniela Garofalo.
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Abstract:

Offering a new understanding of canonical Romanticism, Garofalo argues that Romantic writers critiqued the idea that erotic love enabled one to transcend political and economic realities. William  Read more...

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