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Women of vision oral history interview, 1996 May 18 : Margaret Caples

Author: Margaret Caples; Alexandra Juhasz
Edition/Format:   Film : Film   Visual material : English
Publication:Women of vision : eighteen histories in feminist film and video.
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Margaret Caples begins by talking about meeting photographer Jim Taylor in Chicago in 1971, when he was the director of the new Community Film Workshop (CFW) of Chicago. She mentions that at the time, she was working as a social worker for the Chicago Public School System and decided to enroll in a class at CFW so she could learn how to use video with her student groups. She continues with her involvement with CFW,  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Oral history
Interviews
Named Person: Margaret Caples; Jim Taylor
Material Type: Film
Document Type: Visual material
All Authors / Contributors: Margaret Caples; Alexandra Juhasz
OCLC Number: 423624866
Notes: Interview conducted in Chicago, Illinois for the documentary film project, Women of vision.
Materials not viewed. Summary based on transcript.
Responsibility: interviewer, Alexandra Juhasz.

Abstract:

Margaret Caples begins by talking about meeting photographer Jim Taylor in Chicago in 1971, when he was the director of the new Community Film Workshop (CFW) of Chicago. She mentions that at the time, she was working as a social worker for the Chicago Public School System and decided to enroll in a class at CFW so she could learn how to use video with her student groups. She continues with her involvement with CFW, working as a board member, marrying Taylor in 1972, becoming assistant director of CFW in 1982, and then executive director in 1985. She continues with her perception that her role has been more as an advocate, helping women and people of color find their voice through the broader spectrum of cable television, the media arts, and culture. She continues with the groundbreaking role CFW has played in providing job training opportunities for women and minorities interested in breaking into the film and media industry. She then discusses the long process of nurturing required to develop relationships with local schools and the community and developing artists to work with students. She continues with the original mission of CFW, which was to get more people of color into the film and media industry, a reality that is still not evident more than thirty years later. She continues with the importance of establishing an independent voice in order to create new visions and images that better reflect the reality of diverse communities. She then discusses recent funding challenges and how CFW has been forced to stay lean and downsize, but remain focused on its original mission. She continues with the power of media and its images, the influence of the Women's Movement, the impact of her work on others, community outreach, and the type of training CFW offers. She concludes with the requirement to persevere against the odds and the importance of collaboration to overcome current funding challenges.

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Linked Data


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