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Women on the verge, sounds from beyond : extended vocal technique and visions of womanhood in the vocal theatre of Meredith Monk, Diamanda Galás, and Pauline Oliveros Preview this item
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Women on the verge, sounds from beyond : extended vocal technique and visions of womanhood in the vocal theatre of Meredith Monk, Diamanda Galás, and Pauline Oliveros

Author: Nicole Elaine Anaka; Susan Lewis Hammond; University of Victoria (B.C.). School of Music.; University of Victoria (B.C.).
Publisher: ©2006.
Dissertation: Thesis (M.A.)--University of Victoria, 2006.
Edition/Format:   Thesis/dissertation : Thesis/dissertation : Manuscript   Archival Material : English
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Women composers have not traditionally been at the forefront of genre development. Western classical musical genres and formal structures tend to operate by conventions codified by male composers of European and North American descent, and, accordingly, reflect patriarchal aesthetics and viewpoints. The nascent genre of vocal theatre, however, has been primarily defined by the works of women composer/performers.  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc
Named Person: Meredith Monk; Diamánda Galás; Pauline Oliveros; Diamánda Galás; Meredith Monk; Pauline Oliveros
Material Type: Thesis/dissertation, Manuscript, Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Archival Material, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Nicole Elaine Anaka; Susan Lewis Hammond; University of Victoria (B.C.). School of Music.; University of Victoria (B.C.).
OCLC Number: 858640826
Notes: In partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in the Department of Musicology.
Supervisor: Susan Lewis Hammond.
Description: v, 123 leaves.
Responsibility: by Nicole Elaine Anaka.

Abstract:

Women composers have not traditionally been at the forefront of genre development. Western classical musical genres and formal structures tend to operate by conventions codified by male composers of European and North American descent, and, accordingly, reflect patriarchal aesthetics and viewpoints. The nascent genre of vocal theatre, however, has been primarily defined by the works of women composer/performers. Artists Meredith Monk, Diamanda Galas, and Pauline Oliveros have created new modes of theatre for the voice; in their personal explorations of extended vocal technique, the female voice is used as a tool for discovering, activating, remembering, and uncovering a consciousness that is primordial, pre/anti-logical, and oracular. My thesis proposes that the vocal theatre of these women functions as musical ecriture feminine, a term first introduced by French feminist theorist Helene Cixous. As a theoretical framework, ecriture feminine provides a particularly useful tool for interpreting these works, which, in the importance they place on openness, transcending language, embodied performances, and personal visions of womanhood, reveal aesthetic concerns that in many ways have more in common with the literary genre of ecriture feminine than those of canonical Western art music. I argue that these works are important not only as musical ecriture feminine, but as examples of an alternative, "feminine" compositional practice that prioritizes collaboration, improvisation, and intuitive modes of creativity. In doing so, they destabilize the traditional "maleness" of genre creation.

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