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Words of the world : a global history of the Oxford English dictionary

Author: Sarah Ogilvie
Publisher: Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2013.
Edition/Format:   Book : Biography : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"Most people think of the Oxford English Dictionary (OED) as a distinctly British product. Begun in England one hundred and fifty years ago, it took over sixty years to complete and when it was finally finished in 1928 the British Prime Minister heralded it as a 'national treasure.' This book shows that the dictionary is not as 'British' as we all thought. The linguist and lexicographer, Sarah Ogilvie, combines her  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc
Material Type: Biography
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Sarah Ogilvie
ISBN: 9781107021839 1107021839 9781107605695 1107605695
OCLC Number: 793099497
Description: xvii, 241 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 24 cm
Contents: 1. Entering the OED; 2. A global dictionary from the beginning; 3. James Murray and words of the world; 4. James Murray and the Stanford Dictionary controversy; 5. William Craigie, Charles Onions, and the mysterious case of the vanishing tramlines; 6. Robert Burchfield and words of the world in the OED Supplements; 7. Conclusion.
Responsibility: Sarah Ogilvie.

Abstract:

Demonstrates that the Oxford English Dictionary is an international product in both its content and its making.  Read more...

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'Sarah Ogilvie brings a unique conjunction of abilities to this book: deep practical knowledge of [the] OED and its archives, powerful analytical skills, and personal warmth and flair as a Read more...

 
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