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A World Not to Come : a History of Latino Writing and Print Culture

Author: Raúl Coronado
Publisher: Cambridge, Massachusetts : Harvard University Press, 2013.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"A shift of global proportions occurred in May 1808. Napoleon Bonaparte invaded Spain and deposed the Spanish king. Overnight, the Hispanic world was transformed forever. Hispanics were forced to confront modernity, and to look beyond monarchy and religion for new sources of authority. A World Not to Come focuses on how Spanish Americans in Texas used writing as a means to establish new sources of authority, and how  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Raúl Coronado
ISBN: 9780674072619 0674072618
OCLC Number: 812067684
Description: xiv, 555 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
Contents: Introduction --
I: Imagining New Futures --
Anxiously Desiring the Nation: The Skepticism of Scholasticism --
"Oh! How Much I Could Say!" : Imagining What a Nation Could Do --
II. Pursuing Reform and Revolution --
Seeking the Pueblo's Happiness: Reform and the Discourse of Political Economy --
From Reform to Revolution: Print Culture and Expanding Social Imaginaries --
III. Revolutionizing the Catholic Past --
Seduced by Papers: Revolution (as Reformation) in Spanish Texas --
"We the Pueblo of the Province of Texas": The Philosophy and Brute Reality of Independence --
IV. The Entrance of Life into History --
"To the Advocates of Enlightenment and Reason": From Subjects to Citizens --
"Adhering to the New Order of Things": Newspapers, Publishing, and the Making of a New Social Imaginary --
"The Natural Sympathies That Unite All of Our People": Political Journalism and the Struggle against Racism --
Conclusion.
Responsibility: Raúl Coronado.

Abstract:

In 1808 Napoleon invaded Spain and deposed the king. Overnight, Hispanics were forced to confront modernity and look beyond monarchy and religion for new sources of authority. Coronado focuses on how  Read more...

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Reading British colonial writers as the sole founders of American culture lends our history a false sense of teleology, as though we were always going to end up here. One of the greatest strengths of Read more...

 
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schema:description""A shift of global proportions occurred in May 1808. Napoleon Bonaparte invaded Spain and deposed the Spanish king. Overnight, the Hispanic world was transformed forever. Hispanics were forced to confront modernity, and to look beyond monarchy and religion for new sources of authority. A World Not to Come focuses on how Spanish Americans in Texas used writing as a means to establish new sources of authority, and how a Latino literary and intellectual life was born in the New World. The geographic locale that became Texas changed sovereignty four times, from Spanish colony to Mexican republic to Texan republic and finally to a U.S. state. Following the trail of manifestos, correspondence, histories, petitions, and periodicals, Raúl Coronado goes to the writings of Texas Mexicans to explore how they began the slow process of viewing the world as no longer being a received order but a produced order. Through reconfigured publics, they debated how best to remake the social fabric even as they were caught up in a whirlwind of wars, social upheaval, and political transformations. Yet, while imagining a new world, Texas Mexicans were undergoing a transformation from an elite community of "civilizing" conquerors to an embattled, pauperized, racialized group whose voices were annihilated by war. In the end, theirs was a world not to come. Coronado sees in this process of racialization the birth of an emergent Latino culture and literature."--Publisher's website."@en
schema:description"Introduction -- I: Imagining New Futures -- Anxiously Desiring the Nation: The Skepticism of Scholasticism -- "Oh! How Much I Could Say!" : Imagining What a Nation Could Do -- II. Pursuing Reform and Revolution -- Seeking the Pueblo's Happiness: Reform and the Discourse of Political Economy -- From Reform to Revolution: Print Culture and Expanding Social Imaginaries -- III. Revolutionizing the Catholic Past -- Seduced by Papers: Revolution (as Reformation) in Spanish Texas -- "We the Pueblo of the Province of Texas": The Philosophy and Brute Reality of Independence -- IV. The Entrance of Life into History -- "To the Advocates of Enlightenment and Reason": From Subjects to Citizens -- "Adhering to the New Order of Things": Newspapers, Publishing, and the Making of a New Social Imaginary -- "The Natural Sympathies That Unite All of Our People": Political Journalism and the Struggle against Racism -- Conclusion."@en
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