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Worrorra

Author: Mark Clendon.
Publisher: [s.l.] : University of Adelaide Press, 2014.
Edition/Format:   Computer fileView all editions and formats
Summary:
The Kimberley Arafuran language Worrorra was spoken traditionally on the remote coastline and precipitously beautiful hinterland between the Walcott Inlet and the Prince Regent River. The language described here is that attested by its last full speakers, Patsy Lulpunda, Amy Peters and Daisy Utemorrah. Patsy Lulpunda was a child when Europeans first entered her country in 1912, and Amy Peters and Daisy Utemorrah  Read more...
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Details

Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Mark Clendon.
ISBN: 9781922064592 1922064599 9781922064561 1922064564
OCLC Number: 910913906
Language Note: English.
Notes: The Kimberley Arafuran language Worrorra was spoken traditionally on the remote coastline and precipitously beautiful hinterland between the Walcott Inlet and the Prince Regent River. The language described here is that attested by its last full speakers, Patsy Lulpunda, Amy Peters and Daisy Utemorrah. Patsy Lulpunda was a child when Europeans first entered her country in 1912, and Amy Peters and Daisy Utemorrah both grew up on the Kunmunya mission. This comprehensive and detailed grammar provides as well an historical and cultural context for a society now drastically altered. In the 1950s Worrorra people left their traditional land and from the 1970s the number of people speaking Worrorra as their first language declined dramatically.Worrorra is a highly polysynthetic language, characterised by overarching concord and a high degree of morphological fusion. Verbal semantics involve a voicing opposition and an extensive system of evidentiality-marking. Worrorra has elaborate systems of pragmatic reference, a derivational morphology that projects agreement-class concord across most lexical categories and complex predicates that incorporate one verb within another. Nouns are distributed among five genders, the intensional properties of which define dynamic oppositions between men and women on the one hand, and earth and sky on the other.This volume will be of interest to morphologists, syntacticians, semanticists, anthropologists, typologists, and readers interested in Australian language and culture generally.
Description: 1 online resource (515 S.)
Contents: Summary --
Introduction: Patsy Lulpunda, Amy Peters and Daisy Utemorrah; Geography; Worrorra society; History; How this grammar came to be written; Descriptive tools; What kind of language is Worrorra?; --
Segmental phonology --
Morphophonology --
Nouns and noun classes --
Indicative mood and basic verbal morphology --
Adjectives and inalienable nouns --
Pronouns, demonstratives, anaphors, deictics --
Optative, counterfactual and exercitive moods --
Number --
Adverbs and postpostional phrases --
Complex predicates --
Experiencer constructions --
Objects and possession --
Complement clauses --
Subjunctive verbs --
Middle voice --
Discourse cohesion --
Kinship terms --
Appendices: Texts : Amy Peters: extract from Dawarraweyi; Amy Peters: Kanunerri Warruwarlu --
Irregular verb paradigms ; Transitive verb paradigm; The role-and-reference account of predicate linkage.

Abstract:

The Kimberley Arafuran language Worrorra was spoken traditionally on the remote coastline and precipitously beautiful hinterland between the Walcott Inlet and the Prince Regent River. The language described here is that attested by its last full speakers, Patsy Lulpunda, Amy Peters and Daisy Utemorrah. Patsy Lulpunda was a child when Europeans first entered her country in 1912, and Amy Peters and Daisy Utemorrah both grew up on the Kunmunya mission. This comprehensive and detailed grammar provides as well an historical and cultural context for a society now drastically altered. In the 1950s Worrorra people left their traditional land and from the 1970s the number of people speaking Worrorra as their first language declined dramatically.Worrorra is a highly polysynthetic language, characterised by overarching concord and a high degree of morphological fusion. Verbal semantics involve a voicing opposition and an extensive system of evidentiality-marking. Worrorra has elaborate systems of pragmatic reference, a derivational morphology that projects agreement-class concord across most lexical categories and complex predicates that incorporate one verb within another. Nouns are distributed among five genders, the intensional properties of which define dynamic oppositions between men and women on the one hand, and earth and sky on the other.This volume will be of interest to morphologists, syntacticians, semanticists, anthropologists, typologists, and readers interested in Australian language and culture generally

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