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Writers for the nation : American literary modernism

Author: C Barry Chabot
Publisher: Tuscaloosa : University of Alabama Press, ©1997.
Edition/Format:   Book : State or province government publication : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
The years between World War I and World War II are commonly seen as the period when international modernism took hold in American art. C. Barry Chabot, however, argues against the assumption that American modernist writers were preoccupied by artistic innovation and thus indifferent to the nation's social and political life. Chabot shows that American literary modernists participated actively in a broad conversation  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc
History
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Chabot, C. Barry, 1944-
Writers for the nation.
Tuscaloosa : University of Alabama Press, c1997
(OCoLC)605038460
Named Person: Van Wyck Brooks; Van Wyck Brooks
Material Type: Government publication, State or province government publication
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: C Barry Chabot
ISBN: 0817308776 9780817308773
OCLC Number: 35990220
Description: xi, 290 p. ; 23 cm.
Contents: Van Wyck Brooks and the varieties of American literary modernism --
Willa Cather and the limits of memory --
Eliot, Tate, and the limits of tradition --
Harlem and the limits of a time and place --
Wallace Stevens and the limits of imagination --
The thirties and the failure of the future.
Responsibility: C. Barry Chabot.

Abstract:

The years between World Wars I and II are seen as the period when international modernism took hold in American art. C. Barry Chabot argues against the assumption that American modernist writers were  Read more...

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