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Writing for immortality : women and the emergence of high literary culture in America

Author: Anne E Boyd
Publisher: Baltimore : Johns Hopkins University Press, 2004.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"Writing for Immortality studies the lives and works of four nineteenth-century American women who sought recognition as serious literary artists: Louisa May Alcott, Elizabeth Stuart Phelps, Elizabeth Stoddard, and Constance Fenimore Woolson. Combining literary criticism and cultural history, Anne E. Boyd examines how these authors challenged the masculine connotation of "artist" and struggled to place themselves in  Read more...
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Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Boyd, Anne E., 1969-
Writing for immortality.
Baltimore : Johns Hopkins University Press, 2004
(OCoLC)607570234
Online version:
Boyd, Anne E., 1969-
Writing for immortality.
Baltimore : Johns Hopkins University Press, 2004
(OCoLC)609916764
Named Person: Louisa May Alcott; Elizabeth Stuart Phelps; Elizabeth Stoddard; Constance Fenimore Woolson
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Anne E Boyd
ISBN: 0801878756 9780801878756
OCLC Number: 53002596
Notes: Originally presented as author's thesis (Ph. D.)--Purdue University.
Description: x, 305 p. ; 24 cm.
Contents: Solving the "old riddle of the Sphinx": discovering the self as artist --
"Prov[ing] Avis in the wrong": the lives of women artists --
"The crown and the thorn of gifted life": Imagining the women artist --
"Recognition is the thing": seeking the status of artist.
Responsibility: Anne E. Boyd.
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Abstract:

"Writing for Immortality studies the lives and works of four nineteenth-century American women who sought recognition as serious literary artists: Louisa May Alcott, Elizabeth Stuart Phelps, Elizabeth Stoddard, and Constance Fenimore Woolson. Combining literary criticism and cultural history, Anne E. Boyd examines how these authors challenged the masculine connotation of "artist" and struggled to place themselves in the literary pantheon. Redrawing the boundaries between male and female literary spheres and between American and British literary traditions, Boyd shows how these writers rejected the didacticism of the previous generation of women authors and instead drew their inspiration from the most accomplished "literary" figures of their day: Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry James, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, and George Eliot." "Placing the works and experiences of Alcott, Phelps, Stoddard, and Woolson within contemporary discussions about genius and the American artist, Boyd reaches a sobering conclusion. Although the democratic ideals implicit in such concepts encouraged these women, they nonetheless faced lingering prejudices."--BOOK JACKET.

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schema:reviewBody""Writing for Immortality studies the lives and works of four nineteenth-century American women who sought recognition as serious literary artists: Louisa May Alcott, Elizabeth Stuart Phelps, Elizabeth Stoddard, and Constance Fenimore Woolson. Combining literary criticism and cultural history, Anne E. Boyd examines how these authors challenged the masculine connotation of "artist" and struggled to place themselves in the literary pantheon. Redrawing the boundaries between male and female literary spheres and between American and British literary traditions, Boyd shows how these writers rejected the didacticism of the previous generation of women authors and instead drew their inspiration from the most accomplished "literary" figures of their day: Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry James, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, and George Eliot." "Placing the works and experiences of Alcott, Phelps, Stoddard, and Woolson within contemporary discussions about genius and the American artist, Boyd reaches a sobering conclusion. Although the democratic ideals implicit in such concepts encouraged these women, they nonetheless faced lingering prejudices."--BOOK JACKET."
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