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Writing the empire : Robert Southey and Romantic colonialism

Author: Carol Bolton
Publisher: London : Pickering & Chatto, 2007.
Series: Enlightenment world.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"Bolton examines a broad range of Robert Southey's writing to explore the relationship between Romantic literature and colonial politics during the expansion of Britain's second empire. After decades of neglect, Southey's centrality to Romantic period culture is at last being recognized. Bolton's study draws upon a wide range of interdisciplinary materials to consider the impact of his work upon nineteenth-century  Read more...
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Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Bolton, Carol.
Writing the empire.
London : Pickering & Chatto, 2007
(OCoLC)607757157
Named Person: Robert Southey; Robert Southey
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Carol Bolton
ISBN: 9781851968633 1851968636
OCLC Number: 82672380
Description: x, 332 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Contents: 'Once more I will cry aloud and spare not': Southey's Responses to the African Slave Trade --
'Taking possession': Southey's and Wordsworth's Romantic America --
'Eden's happy vale': Romantic Representations of the South Pacific --
Thalaba the Destroyer: Southey's 'Arabian romance' --
The Curse of Kehama: Missionaries, 'monstrous mythology' and Empire.
Series Title: Enlightenment world.
Responsibility: by Carol Bolton.
More information:

Abstract:

"Bolton examines a broad range of Robert Southey's writing to explore the relationship between Romantic literature and colonial politics during the expansion of Britain's second empire. After decades of neglect, Southey's centrality to Romantic period culture is at last being recognized. Bolton's study draws upon a wide range of interdisciplinary materials to consider the impact of his work upon nineteenth-century views of empire. She situates Southey's histories, biographies, journalism, and epic poetry within their historical and geographical contexts to argue that his widely transmitted views on leadership, duty and global responsibility constituted a moral imperialism that formed Victorian values."--BOOK JACKET.

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