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You took me by surprise : the unknown show music of Vernon Duke

Author: Vernon DukeAlan J PallyMax WilkEddie KorbichChristine PediAll authors
Publisher: New York, 2003.
Edition/Format:   VHS video : VHS tape   Visual material : English
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Program of lesser-known songs by composer Vernon Duke. The material comes from Broadway shows dating from the 1930s to the 1950s, and also from his 1946 show Sweet Bye and Bye, which closed on the road without opening in New York. Veteran performers George S. Irving and Ellen Handley, who worked with Duke in the 1952 revue Two's company, reminisce about the experience. They also discuss the contentious relationship  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: Musicals
Named Person: Vernon Duke; Vernon Duke; Jerome Robbins; Bette Davis
Material Type: Videorecording
Document Type: Visual material
All Authors / Contributors: Vernon Duke; Alan J Pally; Max Wilk; Eddie Korbich; Christine Pedi; George S Irving; Natascia Diaz; Ivy Austin; Ellen Hanley; Michael Lavine
OCLC Number: 747035534
Notes: No credits on tape. Production information gathered from Theatre on Film and Tape Archive files.
This program was part of a series entitled Autumn in New York: Vernon Duke at 100.
Lyricists represented in the selections performed include John La Touche, E. Y. Harburg, and Ogden Nash.
Cast: Narrator and interviewer: Max Wilk.
Music director and pianist: Michael Lavine.
Performers: Eddie Korbich, Christine Pedi, George S. Irving, Natascia Diaz, and Ivy Austin.
Special guest: Ellen Hanley.
Event notes: Videotaped in the Bruno Walter Auditorium, New York Public Library for the Performing Arts, New York, N.Y., Oct. 27, 2003.
Description: 1 videocassette (VHS) (60 min.) : sd., col. SP ; 1/2 in.
Contents: Songs / show (performers): Summer is a-comin' in / The lady comes across (Eddie Korbich, George S. Irving, and Christine Pedi) --
Where have we met before? / Walk a little faster (Natascia Diaz and Michael Lavine) --
I'll take the city / Banjo eyes (Eddie Korbich and Michael Lavine) --
Not a care in the world / Banjo eyes (Eddie Korbich) --
A nickel to my name / Banjo eyes (Michael Lavine) --
We're having a baby / Banjo eyes (George S. Irving and Ivy Austin) --
You took me by surprise / The lady comes across (Natascia Diaz) --
Low and lazy / Sweet bye and bye (Ivy Austin) --
Just like a man / Sweet bye and bye (Ivy Austin) --
Just like a man / Two's company (Christine Pedi) --
Esther / Two's company (George S. Irving) --
Good little girls / Two's company (Christine Pedi, Natascia Diaz, and Ivy Austin) --
I can't get started / Ziegfeld follies of 1936 (company).
Responsibility: The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts presents ; producer, Alan Pally ; all songs composed by Vernon Duke.

Abstract:

Program of lesser-known songs by composer Vernon Duke. The material comes from Broadway shows dating from the 1930s to the 1950s, and also from his 1946 show Sweet Bye and Bye, which closed on the road without opening in New York. Veteran performers George S. Irving and Ellen Handley, who worked with Duke in the 1952 revue Two's company, reminisce about the experience. They also discuss the contentious relationship between the show's star, Bette Davis, and its choreographer, Jerome Robbins.

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Linked Data


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schema:description"Program of lesser-known songs by composer Vernon Duke. The material comes from Broadway shows dating from the 1930s to the 1950s, and also from his 1946 show Sweet Bye and Bye, which closed on the road without opening in New York. Veteran performers George S. Irving and Ellen Handley, who worked with Duke in the 1952 revue Two's company, reminisce about the experience. They also discuss the contentious relationship between the show's star, Bette Davis, and its choreographer, Jerome Robbins."
schema:description"Songs / show (performers): Summer is a-comin' in / The lady comes across (Eddie Korbich, George S. Irving, and Christine Pedi) -- Where have we met before? / Walk a little faster (Natascia Diaz and Michael Lavine) -- I'll take the city / Banjo eyes (Eddie Korbich and Michael Lavine) -- Not a care in the world / Banjo eyes (Eddie Korbich) -- A nickel to my name / Banjo eyes (Michael Lavine) -- We're having a baby / Banjo eyes (George S. Irving and Ivy Austin) -- You took me by surprise / The lady comes across (Natascia Diaz) -- Low and lazy / Sweet bye and bye (Ivy Austin) -- Just like a man / Sweet bye and bye (Ivy Austin) -- Just like a man / Two's company (Christine Pedi) -- Esther / Two's company (George S. Irving) -- Good little girls / Two's company (Christine Pedi, Natascia Diaz, and Ivy Austin) -- I can't get started / Ziegfeld follies of 1936 (company)."
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