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"Young Hickory," the life and times of President James K. Polk.

Author: Martha McBride Morrel
Publisher: New York, E.P. Dutton, 1949.
Edition/Format:   Print book : Biography : English : [1st ed.]View all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
A biography of our eleventh President, who previously served as a U.S. Congressman and a Governor of Tennessee.
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Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Morrel, Martha McBride, 1903-
"Young Hickory,".
New York, E.P. Dutton, 1949
(OCoLC)559276611
Online version:
Morrel, Martha McBride, 1903-
"Young Hickory,".
New York, E.P. Dutton, 1949
(OCoLC)608570989
Named Person: James K Polk; James K Polk
Material Type: Biography
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Martha McBride Morrel
OCLC Number: 1371902
Description: 381 pages portraits 23 cm
Contents: Samuel Polk swung his axe with strong, measured strokes while his father, Ezekiel, watched in silence --
The baby grew into a frail child, well-formed, but small for his age --
Jim Polk and Tennessee were the same age --
Sarah was never one to sit back and wait for destiny, leastwise is a little tactful plotting would speed it on its way --
The summer of 1825 found the "Napoleon of the Stump" on tour again --
"Can I ride with them just as far as the creek?" Sam begged --
Polk's second year in Congress set the pattern of his and Sarah's life for more than a decade to come --
Opening of the Erie Canal, in 1825, and completion, two years later, of the nation's first railroad had given impetus to the clamor for internal improvements --
In the fall of 1833, the Polks hurried toward Washington in their own carriage --
Speaker Stevenson remained in Congress, which was a disappointment --
The "Monster" was slain, the "Czar" deposed --
Polk, at 39, was a veteran congressman with 10 years of experience behind him --
He sits his horse well, Sarah thought as she watched her husband ride off toward the center of town --
Sarah wished she could grasp time in her own two hands and make the summer of 1836 last forever --
Andrew Jackson was a sick man and he should have stayed in bed --
Sarah chatted with Dolly Madison as casually as if they were visiting over a cup of tea --
Speaker Polk found himself in the position of the tightrope walker, with those holding the two ends of the rope trying to jerk it out of each other's hands --
Polk often seemed slow about making up his mind --
Henry Clay came over from the Senate to bid farewell to Speaker Polk --
On Monday morning, the 14th of October, 1839, Nashville's First Presbyterian Church was filled to capacity --
Polk made no public response to the legislature's nomination --
Cherry Street was a checkerboard of light and darkness, proclaiming the political faith of its residents --
Free barbecues; parades by day and by night; handbills bearing caricatures and slander; barrels of Whig cider and barrels of Democratic whiskey; songs, mottos, and slogans; newspapers filled with hyperbolic editorials that made the blood tingle with pride or anger --
On the 16th of November, Polk learned that it was the Whigs, and not the "legitimate children of the Genius of Liberty," who had won in Pennsylvania --
"Which side do you want, Governor?" Mr. Jones asked, hanging his hat on one of the bedposts --
Although no one suspected it at the time, Polk's destiny was settled midway between his first and second defeats --
From November, 1843 until February, 1844, the Nashville Union carried the following on its masthead: For President the nominee of the Baltimore Convention for Vice-President James K. Polk of Tennessee --
Polk was genuinely surprised --
A fortnight later, the convention opened to the boom of cannon --
To all but a handful of men, Polk's nomination was as astonishing as a thunderclap on a clear day --
General Armstrong, alone in the Nashville post office, glanced at the clock and pulled his chair closer to the stove --
Young Hickory was late getting to his office --
On Tuesday, the 28th of January, Middle Tennessee was veiled in a misty rain that turned to snow as the day wore on --
On Inauguration Day, war clouds bordered the horizon --
Tyler had tried to cut the pattern for his successor's Oregon policy as well as that of Texas --
On April 23, 1846, the same day on which Paredes issued his proclamation of war, the Congress of the United States passed an act authorizing termination of the Oregon Treaty --
At 6 o'clock on Saturday evening, May 9, 1846, Polk received word of the attack on Taylor's forces --
"You can't keep this up indefinitely," Sarah told her husband --
Four months after his supposed holiday at Fortress Munroe, the president was beset by a succession of illnesses --
Joanna Rucker, Knox Walker, and the latter's wife and children were long-term guests --
Late in January, Polk wrote in his diary: "I am responsible for the conduct of the war, yet Congress refused to give me a commander in whom I have confidence and I am compelled to employ officers whom the law has provided, however unfit they may be" --
Polk's first hint of what Scott and Trist were up to came in a letter received on the 14th of September --
A feathery snow fell over Washington, obliterating the wheel tracks in the White House driveway and covering the footprints around the entrance --
Henry Clay was 71 --
On the 7th of November, 1848, nearly 3 million voters went to the polls --
Spain's rejection of our bid for Cuba seemed of small importance --
Polk's last week in office was filled with grave consultations and trivial interruptions --
"Shh!" Sarah whispered, as she admitted her maid to the bedroom --
When Polk left the capital on the 6th of March, he had a severe cold and was exhausted by strain and overwork --
Grundy Place, rechristened Polk Place, should have been ready for immediate occupancy --
A hush lay over Polk Place --
Epilogue : Press reaction to Polk's death fell into three general categories.

Abstract:

A biography of our eleventh President, who previously served as a U.S. Congressman and a Governor of Tennessee.

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Primary Entity

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