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Smiley, George (Fictitious character)

Overview
Works: 157 works in 693 publications in 1 language and 47,732 library holdings
Genres: Fiction  Drama  Spy stories  Criticism, interpretation, etc  Film adaptations  Television adaptations  Suspense fiction  Spy television programs  Detective and mystery stories  Juvenile works 
Classifications: PR6062.E33, 823.914
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about George (Fictitious character) Smiley
Most widely held works about George (Fictitious character) Smiley
    Tinker, tailor, soldier, spy by John Le Carré( Book )
    49 editions published between 1974 and 2011 in English and Undetermined and held by 5,393 libraries worldwide
    George Smiley is assigned to uncover the identitiy of the double agent operating in the highest levels of British Intelligence
    The spy who came in from the cold by John Le Carré( Book )
    46 editions published between 1963 and 2013 in English and Undetermined and held by 4,954 libraries worldwide
    On its publication In 1964, John le Carre's The Spy Who Came In from the Cold forever changed the landscape of spy fiction. Le Carre combined the inside knowledge of his years in British intelligence with the skills of the best novelists to produce a story as taut as it is twisting, unlike any previously experienced, which transports us back to the shadowy years in the early 1960s when the Berlin Wall went up and the Cold War came to life. When the last agent under his command is killed in Berlin, Alec Leamas, weary and disillusioned, is called back to London by his spymaster, Control, hoping to finally come in from the cold. Instead, Control has one last assignment for Leamas: to adopt the role of a disgraced agent and return behind the Iron Curtain as bait to bring down the head of East German intelligence. Layering plot over plot, le Carre reveals a dirty game of betrayal and assumed identity in which individuals are expendable and neither side is honorable. The Spy Who Came In from the Cold was hailed as a classic as soon as it was published. With an illuminating new foreword by bestselling author Joseph Kanon, it remains one today. A new hardcover edition of the book Graham Greene called "the best spy story I have ever read."
    Smiley's people by John Le Carré( Book )
    27 editions published between 1979 and 2011 in English and held by 4,056 libraries worldwide
    In London at dead of night, George Smiley, sometime acting Chief of the Circus (aka the British Secret Service), is summoned from his lonely bed by news of the murder of an ex-agent. Lured back to active service, Smiley skillfully maneuvers his people -- "the no-men of no-man's land"--Into crisscrossing Paris, London, Germany, and Switzerland as he prepares for his own final, inevitable duel on the Berlin border with his Soviet counterpart and archenemy, Karla
    The honourable schoolboy by John Le Carré( Book )
    33 editions published between 1977 and 2011 in English and held by 3,971 libraries worldwide
    In an attempt to recover from the devastating effects of having uncovered a double agent in a high position in its organization, the British Secret Service carries out an elaborate espionage scheme in the Far East
    Tinker tailor soldier spy by John Le Carré( visu )
    37 editions published between 1991 and 2012 in English and held by 3,205 libraries worldwide
    At the height of the Cold War, a former agent for the British Secret Intelligence Service is called back to root out a Russian spy who has infiltrated the organization's highest levels
    Call for the dead by John Le Carré( Book )
    36 editions published between 1961 and 2013 in English and held by 2,975 libraries worldwide
    Premier spy novelist John le Carrs first novel introduces the world's most famous undercover operative, George Smiley, who, though bitter and weary with all he has seen and done, cannot refuse one last desperate call for his services
    The secret pilgrim by John Le Carré( Book )
    17 editions published between 1990 and 2011 in English and held by 2,971 libraries worldwide
    Ned considered delivering his own speech to the new "Joes" at Saratt, but in the end, he called on George Smiley, the legendary officer who had retired to Cornwall. Smiley's "fireside chat" gives the dangerous edge back to Ned's memory, transporting him to his own beginnings as an agent in the 60s when the Red Peril was everywhere
    A murder of quality by John Le Carré( Book )
    28 editions published between 1962 and 2012 in English and held by 1,977 libraries worldwide
    A retired undercover agent, a charming but dangerous woman, and an aging intellectual are drawn together by murder among England's upper crust
    Tinker, tailor, soldier, spy by John Le Carré( Sound Recording )
    25 editions published between 1981 and 2013 in English and held by 1,832 libraries worldwide
    Who is the mole buried within British intelligence, planted by Karla in Moscow years ago? George Smiley is back, in the first novel of The quest for Karla trilogy
    A murder of quality by John Le Carré( file )
    30 editions published between 1986 and 2012 in English and held by 1,136 libraries worldwide
    "We're looking for a stranger, six feet tall, wearing boots size 10-1/2, leather gloves and an old blue overcoat stained with blood," Inspector Rigby said. "A man who travels on foot, who was in the area on the night of the murder, taking with him one-and-a-half feet of coaxial cable, a string of beads, and an imitation diamond clip. We're looking for a maniac, a man who kills for pleasure or the price of a meal-and who can fly 50 feet through the air
    Call for the dead by John Le Carré( file )
    20 editions published between 1987 and 2012 in English and held by 1,110 libraries worldwide
    George Smiley had liked Samuel Fennan, and now Fennan was dead from an apparent suicide. But why? Fennan, a Foreign Office man, had been under investigation for alleged Communist Party activities, but Smiley had made it clear that the investigation -- little more than a routine security check -- was over and that the file on Fennan could be closed. The very next day, Fennan was found dead with a note by his body saying his career was finished and he couldn't go on. Smiley was puzzled
    John le Carré by Peter Elfed Lewis( Book )
    3 editions published in 1985 in English and held by 860 libraries worldwide
    Smiley's people by John Le Carré( Computer File )
    19 editions published between 1990 and 2014 in English and held by 704 libraries worldwide
    Smiley knew him. He lay face downward with a plastic sheet spread over him. He was an old man, who had battled and endured and he had one more secret to tell. It was a secret the solution to which had dogged Smiley's whole career. Smiley's people brings the conflict between George Smiley and his couterpart, the Russian spy master Karla, to a final confrontation
    The spy who came in from the cold by John Le Carré( file )
    8 editions published between 1987 and 2011 in English and held by 674 libraries worldwide
    A veteran spy wants to "come in" to retirement. He undertakes one last assignment in which he pretends defection and provides the enemy with evidence to label their leader as a double agent
    The quest for Karla by John Le Carré( Book )
    1 edition published in 1982 in English and held by 671 libraries worldwide
    Three Novels; Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy-The Honourable Schoolboy-Smiley's People
    The spy who came in from the cold by Martin Ritt( visu )
    5 editions published between 1994 and 2013 in English and held by 670 libraries worldwide
    A burnt-out British spy defects to East Germany as a ruse to feed false information to the government
    John le Carré ( Book )
    3 editions published in 1987 in English and held by 668 libraries worldwide
    A selection of criticism-arranged in chronological order of publication, devoted to the fiction of John le Carré
    John le Carré by Lynn Beene( Book )
    3 editions published between 1992 and 1999 in English and held by 652 libraries worldwide
    In John le Carre's artful espionage novels, the most prominent "spy" might well be the author himself, for throughout his fiction readers see a worried, conscientious man peering into the deformed hearts of those who would betray his people and warning us of their trickery. Le Carre (the pen name of David John Moore Cornwell) has amassed broad popular and critical appeal by exploring difficult subjects while keeping his books engaging, lucid, and within the boundaries of the genre he now defines. Using his constant theme of the meretricious relationship of love and betrayal, he exploits the conventions of espionage fiction to show that no absolute standards of public or personal conduct exist, that humanism, no matter how ponderously examined, cannot avoid inhumanity. In this comprehensive study of one of Britain's most prolific novelists (and alumnus of its espionage activities), LynnDianne Beene identifies le Carre's considerable talent at manipulating the espionage genre to bring it in line with his relentless moral vision. Beene finds that the best of le Carre's novels - The Spy Who Came in from the Cold (1964), Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy (1974), Smiley's People (1980), and The Little Drummer Girl (1983) - borrow some conventions from popular thrillers but are essentially literary fiction. Although le Carre's thrillers, like the work of genre novelists, include resourceful agents, animated narratives, technical espionage devices, and entangled political affairs, his characters, Beene contends, are more reminiscent of Charles Dickens's best caricatures: their actions remind readers that decency, love, and the line between betrayal and loyalty are precarious. In the tradition of Joseph Conrad, Somerset Maugham, and Graham Greene, le Carre creates largely convincing characters whose often unshakable faith in conspiracy leads uncontrollably to treachery. Although often efficient, le Carre's people are pawns in an espionage chess game where betrayal is the basic tactic: once caught in the game, Beene observes, their only escapes are betrayal, death, or, worse, self-realization and angst, as is the case with the perennial character George Smiley. Le Carre is singular among contemporary writers because, Beene argues, he exchanges action, the mainstay of espionage fiction and that which makes the genre pure entertainment, for psychological debate and ethical paralysis. Le Carre writes of an "our side" indistinguishable from "theirs": "we" can be incompetent, fumbling, and mindlessly destructive; "they" can be decent, conscientious, and dedicated. Beene judiciously avoids literary categories in this straightforward, chronological analysis of le Carre, ranking him with the best of Britain's nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century novelists but not disregarding the fact that he is a writer of his time, of the cold war's technological gadgetry and often absurd political liaisons. Her portrait will prove of particular interest to students of what is now a containable literary period: the cold war, 1945-1989
    The incongruous spy; two novels of suspense by John Le Carré( Book )
    3 editions published between 1963 and 1964 in English and held by 624 libraries worldwide
    John Le Carré's Smiley's people by John Le Carré( visu )
    7 editions published between 1982 and 2013 in English and held by 593 libraries worldwide
    The bespectacled spymaster is once more called from retirement to come to the aid of the 'Circus'--and he returns with a vengeance. The murder of an emigre Soviet General who was also a British agent, sends him digging into the past on a twisted trail across Europe that moves, inexorably, towards a final showdown with his old adversary, Karla of Moscow Centre
 
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English (398)
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