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Luo, Xubei

Overview
Works: 23 works in 66 publications in 1 language and 514 library holdings
Classifications: HG3881.5.W57, 332.153091724
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about Xubei Luo
Publications by Xubei Luo
Most widely held works by Xubei Luo
Multilateral banks and the development process : vital links in the results chain by Vinod Thomas( Book )
2 editions published in 2012 in English and held by 127 libraries worldwide
A chain is only as strong as its weakest link. When the links in the chain represent development projects, if individual projects fail to achieve their purpose, the development program's effectiveness is compromised. When the chain's links are strong and well-connected, the results are improved for the sector, country, and region. The role of multilateral banks is crucial; they inform the impact of development operations and support policymakers in decision making. This volume emphasizes that some crucial links in development tend to be systematically overlooked. In these matters, preoccupation with the immediate exigencies seems to come at the expense of attention to enduring problems--at a great cost to society. Development practitioners should apply policies that have produced results over time, ensuring that the links in the chain are strong, but too often they overlook those links--because of myopia, complexity, tradition, or special interests. This book will help policy makers and practitioners focus on the links that measure progress, apply lessons, and matter for lasting results
Growth spillover effects and regional development patterns the case of Chinese provinces by Xubei Luo( file )
6 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 56 libraries worldwide
"The author discusses regional development patterns in China and examines effective ways of using development aid to attain regional balanced growth through optimizing growth spillover effects. Based on provincial panel data from 1978-99 she constructs an indicator "neighborhood performance" to measure the geographic spillover effects of aggregate growth from and to different provinces according to their relative richness and geographic position. Analysis of a Solow-type growth model suggests that positive spillover effects dominate negative shadow effects at the national level as well as the regional level, and some coastal provinces provide growth pull and growth push forces for their neighbors and serve as locomotives. The results show that the rapid takeoff of the coastal provinces has the largest spillover effects on the Chinese economy, but at the expense of a widening regional gap ... "--Cover verso
Nonfarm activity and rural income inequality : a case study of two provinces in China by Nong Zhu( file )
7 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 54 libraries worldwide
Nonfarm activity plays an increasingly important role in rural household income. Based on data from the Living Standards Measurement Study in the provinces of Hebei and Liaoning, the authors study the distribution of nonfarm income in rural China. First, they assume nonfarm income as an exogenous transfer to total income to decompose the Gini index. Second, they assume nonfarm income as a potential substitute for farm income to take household choices into account and simulate household income. The results show that nonfarm activity reduces rural income inequality by raising the income of poor households to a larger extent than that of rich households. Improving rural infrastructure and implementing universal basic education are critical to build up the capacity of households (in particular, poor households) to participate in nonfarm activity. Strengthening the links between farm activity and nonfarm activity is essential to optimize the contribution of nonfarm activity to pro-poor rural economic development
Openness, industrialization, and geographic concentration of activities in China by Maurice Catin( file )
7 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 53 libraries worldwide
"Rapid development, a widening regional gap, and growing concentration of activities have characterized the Chinese economy since the reforms in the late 1970s. This paper examines the spatial disparities of the economic concentration in different stages of development from a geographic approach in the case of China. It aims at offering empirical supports on (1) how concentrated the economic activities are; (2) what factors determine the economic concentration; and (3) whether this concentration differs in the coastal and inland regions. The results show that the high-technology industries highly concentrate in the coastal provinces. The limited diffusion of the labor intensive activities within the coastal region does not significantly modify the major trend of the location and specialization of the industries in the inland region, and does not contribute to narrowing the regional disparities. The paper argues that in order to stimulate the geographic diffusion of economic activities to the inland region, it is important to appropriately alleviate internal migration control, reduce unnecessary state intervention, and further encourage domestic market integration. "--World Bank web site
Regional Disparities In Labor Market Performance In Croatia : The Role of Individual And Regional Structural Characteristics by Xubei Luo( file )
7 editions published in 2007 in English and Undetermined and held by 52 libraries worldwide
The labor market performance in Croatia failed to keep pace with the moderately good overall macroeconomic development in the past few years. Youth, the less well-educated, and women face more difficulties in getting a job with a decent salary. A large part of the difference in regional labor market performance is associated with the difference in the human capital endowment. With a stagnant total employment rate, the large disparities in employment and earnings across individual groups and regions have become one of the concerns for the long-term sustainable development of the economy. Using Labor Force Survey (LFS) data from 2002-04, this paper studies the labor market performance in Croatia at the national and regional levels. The results show that both one's individual characteristics (including age, education and gender) and where he or she works plays a role in his or her employment and earnings. Regional differences in employment and earnings are reduced to a large extent when accounting for differences in individual characteristics. The simulations shed light on the effectiveness of the nationwide education policy and regional specific labor market policy, and suggest that improving human capital endowment and adjusting labor market structure are both important to rebalance regional development and enhance total welfare
The role of infrastructure investment location in China's Western development by Xubei Luo( Book )
4 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 52 libraries worldwide
Entering the union : European accession and capacity-building priorities by John S Wilson( Book )
9 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 49 libraries worldwide
"The authors examine the impact of trade facilitation on bilateral trade flows. They examine trade facilitation and capacity-building priorities in 12 countries in the Europe and Central Asia region-eight of the current members of the European Union: Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Slovakia, and Slovenia, and three candidate members: Bulgaria, Romania, and Turkey. The results suggest that behind-the-border factors play an important role in determining bilateral trade flows (controlling for the effects of tariffs, development levels, distance, and regional characteristics of exporters and importers, among other factors). The development of new data sets to expand work related to trade facilitation, including strengthening the empirical work explored here, is a key priority without which intelligent policy and priorities cannot be made. The authors' analysis is based on data from the World Economic Forum, Global Competitiveness Report 2001-2002, World Competitiveness Yearbook 2000, and Kaufmann, Kraay, and Zoido-Lobaton (2002). The results indicate that more gains in exports than in imports are expected should the values of three out of the four indicators (port efficiency, regulatory regimes, and information technology infrastructure) of the new and candidate member countries improve halfway to the EU15 average. These countries would expect large trade gains as well as improvements in trade balances as their integration into the EU continues. For example, the greatest absolute trade gains-$49 billion and $62 billion respectively-could be expected if their port efficiency and information technology infrastructure reach half the average level of the EU, and 70 percent of trade gains are associated with export expansion. "--World Bank web site
The Impact of Remittances On Rural Poverty And Inequality In China by Nong Zhu( Computer File )
6 editions published in 2008 in English and Undetermined and held by 26 libraries worldwide
Large numbers of agricultural labor moved from the countryside to cities after the economic reforms in China. Migration and remittances play an important role in transforming the structure of rural household income. This paper examines the impact of rural-to-urban migration on rural poverty and inequality in the case of Hubei province using the data of a 2002 household survey. Since remittances are a potential substitute for farm income, the paper presents counterfactual scenarios of what rural income, poverty, and inequality would have been in the absence of migration. The results show that, by providing alternatives to households with lower marginal labor productivity in agriculture, migration leads to an increase in rural income. In contrast to many studies that suggest the increasing share of non-farm income in total income widens inequality, this paper offers support for the hypothesis that migration tends to have egalitarian effects on rural income for three reasons: (i) migration is rational self-selection - farmers with higher agricultural productivities choose to remain in local agricultural production while those with higher expected return in urban non-farm sectors migrate; (ii) poorer households facing binding constraints of land shortage are more likely to migrate; and (iii) the poorest poor benefit disproportionately from remittances
Rising income inequality in China a race to the top by Xubei Luo( file )
4 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 26 libraries worldwide
"Income inequality in China has risen rapidly in the past decades across regions, between rural and urban sectors, and within provinces. The dynamics of divergence across these sub-national areas have taken the form of a "race to the top" - meaning that all segments of the population, including the poor with low education in lagging inland rural areas, have experienced gains in average income. The largest gains have been registered by those with higher income and education in leading coastal urban areas. Using the China Economic, Population, Nutrition and Health Survey data of 1989 and 2004, we show that the most important factors explaining overall inequality are differential returns to schooling and sector of employment. A decomposition analysis based on household income determination shows that the increase in returns to education explains two-thirds of income changes in urban areas and one-sixth in rural areas. The widening income gaps are the consequence of higher growth in leading urban and coastal areas and that the skilled population has benefited more from the economic reforms carried out during the last 25 years. The authors argue that rising income inequality can be part of a normal process of development at a certain stage, and that the dynamics of spatial income divergence in the form of "a race to the top" can be desirable to some extent as it unleashes competitive pressure and creates incentives for investment in skills. Continuing to improve market efficiency and investing in people, in particular improving education service in lagging areas to poor people, are important for sustainable growth and equitable distribution in the long run. "--World Bank web site
Openness, Industrialization, And Geographic Concentration Of Activities In China by Maurice Catin( file )
1 edition published in 2005 in Undetermined and held by 3 libraries worldwide
Nonfarm Activity And Rural Income Inequality a Case Study Of Two Provinces In China by Xubei Luo( file )
1 edition published in 2006 in Undetermined and held by 2 libraries worldwide
Growth Spillover Effects And Regional Development Patterns The Case Of Chinese Provinces by Xubei Luo( Computer File )
1 edition published in 2005 in Undetermined and held by 2 libraries worldwide
Entering The Union European Accession And Capacity-Building Priorities by Xubei Luo( file )
1 edition published in 2006 in Undetermined and held by 2 libraries worldwide
Openness, industrialization, and geographic concentration of activities in China by Maurice Catin( Sound Recording )
1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 1 library worldwide
"Rapid development, a widening regional gap, and growing concentration of activities have characterized the Chinese economy since the reforms in the late 1970s. This paper examines the spatial disparities of the economic concentration in different stages of development from a geographic approach in the case of China. It aims at offering empirical supports on (1) how concentrated the economic activities are; (2) what factors determine the economic concentration; and (3) whether this concentration differs in the coastal and inland regions. The results show that the high-technology industries highly concentrate in the coastal provinces. The limited diffusion of the labor intensive activities within the coastal region does not significantly modify the major trend of the location and specialization of the industries in the inland region, and does not contribute to narrowing the regional disparities. The paper argues that in order to stimulate the geographic diffusion of economic activities to the inland region, it is important to appropriately alleviate internal migration control, reduce unnecessary state intervention, and further encourage domestic market integration. "--World Bank web site
Nonfarm activity and rural income inequality a case study of two provinces in China by Nong Zhu( Sound Recording )
1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 1 library worldwide
"Nonfarm activity plays an increasingly important role in rural household income. Based on data from the Living Standards Measurement Study in the provinces of Hebei and Liaoning, the authors study the distribution of nonfarm income in rural China. First, they assume nonfarm income as an exogenous transfer to total income to decompose the Gini index. Second, they assume nonfarm income as a potential substitute for farm income to take household choices into account and simulate household income. The results show that nonfarm activity reduces rural income inequality by raising the income of poor households to a larger extent than that of rich households. Improving rural infrastructure and implementing universal basic education are critical to build up the capacity of households (in particular, poor households) to participate in nonfarm activity. Strengthening the links between farm activity and nonfarm activity is essential to optimize the contribution of nonfarm activity to pro-poor rural economic development. "--World Bank web site
Rising income inequality in China a race to the top by Xubei Luo( Sound Recording )
1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 1 library worldwide
Education and wage differentials in the Philippines by Xubei Luo( Sound Recording )
1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 1 library worldwide
Entering the union european accession and capacity-building priorities by John S Wilson( Sound Recording )
1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 1 library worldwide
"The authors examine the impact of trade facilitation on bilateral trade flows. They examine trade facilitation and capacity-building priorities in 12 countries in the Europe and Central Asia region-eight of the current members of the European Union: Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Slovakia, and Slovenia, and three candidate members: Bulgaria, Romania, and Turkey. The results suggest that behind-the-border factors play an important role in determining bilateral trade flows (controlling for the effects of tariffs, development levels, distance, and regional characteristics of exporters and importers, among other factors). The development of new data sets to expand work related to trade facilitation, including strengthening the empirical work explored here, is a key priority without which intelligent policy and priorities cannot be made. The authors' analysis is based on data from the World Economic Forum, Global Competitiveness Report 2001-2002, World Competitiveness Yearbook 2000, and Kaufmann, Kraay, and Zoido-Lobaton (2002). The results indicate that more gains in exports than in imports are expected should the values of three out of the four indicators (port efficiency, regulatory regimes, and information technology infrastructure) of the new and candidate member countries improve halfway to the EU15 average. These countries would expect large trade gains as well as improvements in trade balances as their integration into the EU continues. For example, the greatest absolute trade gains-$49 billion and $62 billion respectively-could be expected if their port efficiency and information technology infrastructure reach half the average level of the EU, and 70 percent of trade gains are associated with export expansion. "--World Bank web site
Disparities in labor market performance in the Philippines by Xubei Luo( Sound Recording )
1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 1 library worldwide
Growth spillover effects and regional development patterns the case of Chinese provinces by Xubei Luo( Sound Recording )
1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 1 library worldwide
"The author discusses regional development patterns in China and examines effective ways of using development aid to attain regional balanced growth through optimizing growth spillover effects. Based on provincial panel data from 1978-99 she constructs an indicator "neighborhood performance" to measure the geographic spillover effects of aggregate growth from and to different provinces according to their relative richness and geographic position. Analysis of a Solow-type growth model suggests that positive spillover effects dominate negative shadow effects at the national level as well as the regional level, and some coastal provinces provide growth pull and growth push forces for their neighbors and serve as locomotives. The results show that the rapid takeoff of the coastal provinces has the largest spillover effects on the Chinese economy, but at the expense of a widening regional gap. A policy of encouraging the growth of the non-coastal regional hubs would have strong forward and backward linkages with the inland and western regions and thus reduce the regional development gap without sacrificing much aggregate growth. The author offers support for the policy of developing inland hubs, and argues that directing development aid to Hubei and Sichuan would optimize the growth spillover impacts on inland regions. "--World Bank web site
 
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Alternative Names
Xubei Luo.
Languages
English (57)
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