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Bain, Alexander 1818-1903

Overview
Works: 235 works in 1,522 publications in 6 languages and 10,587 library holdings
Genres: Biography  History  Handbooks, manuals, etc  Textbooks 
Roles: Editor, Contributor, Annotator, Other
Classifications: B1596, 150
Publication Timeline
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Publications about Alexander Bain
Publications by Alexander Bain
Publications by Alexander Bain, published posthumously.
Most widely held works about Alexander Bain
 
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Most widely held works by Alexander Bain
The senses and the intellect by Alexander Bain( Book )
92 editions published between 1855 and 2013 in English and Undetermined and held by 942 libraries worldwide
"The object of this treatise is to give a full and systematic account of two principal divisions of the science of mind, the Senses and the Intellect. The remaining two divisions, comprising the Emotions and the Will, will be the subject of a future treatise. While endeavouring to present in a methodical form all the important facts and doctrines bearing upon mind, considered as a branch of science, I have seen reason to adopt some new views, and to depart in a few instances from the most usual arrangement of the topics"--Chapter. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved)
The emotions and the will by Alexander Bain( Book )
86 editions published between 1859 and 2010 in English and held by 907 libraries worldwide
"The present publication is a sequel to my former one (see record 2004-20103-000), on the Senses and the Intellect, and completes a Systematic Exposition of the Human Mind. The generally admitted but vaguely conceived doctrine of the connection between mind and body has been throughout discussed definitely. In treating of the Emotions, I include whatever is known of the physical embodiment of each. The Natural History Method, adopted in delineating the Sensations, is continued in the Treatise on the Emotions. The first chapter is devoted to Emotion in general; after which the individual kinds are classified and discussed; separate chapters being assigned to the Aesthetic Emotions, arising on the contemplation of Beauty in Nature and Art, and to the Ethical, or the Moral Sentiment. Under this last head, I have gone fully into the Theory of Moral Obligation. It has been too much the practice to make the discussion of the Will comprise only the single metaphysical problem of Liberty and Necessity. Departing from this narrow usage, I have sought to ascertain the nature of the faculty itself, its early germs, or foundations in the human constitution, and the course of its development, from its feeblest indications in infancy to the maturity of its power. Five chapters are occupied with this investigation; and five more with subjects falling under the domain of the Will, including the Conflict of Motives, Deliberation, Resolution, Effort, Desire, Moral Habits, Duty, and Moral Inability. A closing chapter embraces the Free-will controversy. As in my view, Belief is essentially related to the active part of our being, I have reserved the consideration of it to the conclusion of the Treatise on the Will. The final dissertation of the work is on Consciousness"--Préface. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved)
Education as a science by Alexander Bain( Book )
122 editions published between 1867 and 2004 in 5 languages and held by 850 libraries worldwide
"In the present work I have surveyed the Teaching Art, as far as possible, from a scientific point of view; which means, among other things, that the maxims of ordinary experience are tested and amended by bringing them under the best ascertained laws of the mind. I have devoted one long chapter to an account of the Intellect and the Emotions in their bearings on education. The remainder of the work is occupied with the several topics more specially connected with the subject. There are certain terms and phrases that play a leading part in the various discussions; and to each of these I have endeavoured at the outset to assign a precise meaning. They are--Memory, Judgment, Imagination, proceeding from the Known to the Unknown, Analysis and Synthesis, Object Lesson, Information and Training, doing One Thing Well. A separate consideration is also bestowed on Education Values, or an enquiry into the worth of the various subjects included in the usual routine of instruction; the largest amount of space being given to Science. Under the designation--Sequence of Subjects (Psychological and Logical), a number of important matters are brought forward, it is thought, in an advantageous way. These preparatory matters being disposed of, the main topic--the Methods of Teaching--is entered upon. After adverting to what concerns the first elements of Reading, I proceed to the delicate question of the commencement of Knowledge teaching. It is here that we are introduced to the Object Lesson, which, more than anything else, demands a careful handling; there being great apparent danger lest an admirable device should settle down into a plausible but vicious formality. The Mother Tongue has a place appropriated to itself. Everything that relates to it as an acquirement--Vocabulary, Grammar, the Higher Composition, and Literature--is minutely canvassed. A chapter is assigned to an estimate of the value of Latin and Greek at the present day. On the wide subject of Moral Education, the plan adopted is to bring into prominence the points where the teaching appears most ready to go astray. As respects Religion, I have principally confined myself to the connection between it and moral instruction. A short chapter on Art teaching endeavours to cleat away some prevailing misconceptions, especially in the relationship of Art and Morality. The general strain of the work is a war, not so much against error, as against confusion. The methods of education have already made much progress; and it were vain to look forward to some single discovery that could change our whole system. Yet I believe that improvements remain to be effected. I take every opportunity of urging, that the division of labour, in the shape of disjoining incongruous exercises, is a chief requisite in any attempt to remodel the teaching art"--Preface. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved)
James Mill, a biography by Alexander Bain( Book )
45 editions published between 1882 and 2011 in English and Undetermined and held by 750 libraries worldwide
"This book is a biography of the life and times of the philosopher and historian James Mill." (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved)
John Stuart Mill; a criticism with personal recollections by Alexander Bain( Book )
45 editions published between 1882 and 2004 in English and Undetermined and held by 683 libraries worldwide
"In the present work, I do not propose to give the complete biography of John Stuart Mill. My chief object is to examine fully his writings and character; in doing which, I have drawn freely upon my personal recollections of the second half of his life. By means of family documents, I have been able to add a few important particulars to his own account of his early years"--Preface. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
Mind and body; the theories of their relation by Alexander Bain( Book )
104 editions published between 1872 and 2005 in English and held by 672 libraries worldwide
"This book examines mind and body interconnexions. What has Mind to do with brain substance, white and grey? Can any facts or laws regarding the spirit of man be gained through a scrutiny of nerve fibres and nerve cells? If the matter of the brain were the only substance that mental functions could be attributed to, all the knowledge that we possess of that organ might not avail us much in laying down laws of connexion between mind and body. But such is not the fact. The entire bodily system, though in varying degrees, is in intimate alliance with mental functions. To confine our study to the nervous substance would be to misrepresent the connexion; and the knowledge of that substance, however complete, would not suffice for the solution of the problem. Looking at a child's cut finger, we can divine its feelings; if we see a smiling countenance, we know something of the mental tone of the individual. It might seem that we must yet be a long way from understanding an organ so minute and so complicated as the Brain. If we were to confine ourselves to the one mode of post-mortem dissection, we should probably attain but a small measure of success. But another road is open. We can begin at the outworks, at the organs of sense and motion, with which the nervous system communicates; we can study their operations during life, as well as examine their intimate structure; we can experimentally vary all the circumstances of their operation; we can find how they act upon the brain, and how the brain re-acts upon them. Using all this knowledge as a key, we may possibly unlock the secrets of the anatomical structure; we may compel the cells and fibres to disclose their meaning and purpose"--Book. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved)
Analysis of the phenomena of the human mind by James Mill( Book )
38 editions published between 1869 and 1982 in English and held by 422 libraries worldwide
"This book is an attempt to reach the simplest elements which by their combination generate the manifold complexity of our mental states, and to assign the laws of those elements, and the elementary laws of their combination, from which laws, the subordinate ones which govern the compound states are consequences and corollaries. The phenomena of the Mind include multitudes of facts, of an extraordinary degree of complexity. By observing them one at a time with sufficient care, it is possible in the mental, as it is in the material world, to obtain empirical generalizations of limited compass, but of great value for practice. When, however, we find it possible to connect many of these detached generalizations together, by discovering the more general laws of which they are cases, and to the operation of which in some particular sets of circumstances they are due, we gain not only a scientific, but a practical advantage; for we then first learn how far we can rely on the more limited generalizations; within what conditions their truth is confined; by what changes of circumstances they would be defeated or modified"--Preface. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved)
Aristotle by George Grote( Book )
36 editions published between 1872 and 1998 in English and held by 394 libraries worldwide
English composition and rhetoric by Alexander Bain( Book )
79 editions published between 1866 and 2005 in English and held by 388 libraries worldwide
Mental and moral science. A compendium of psychology and ethics by Alexander Bain( Book )
50 editions published between 1868 and 2004 in English and Undetermined and held by 297 libraries worldwide
"The present treatise, contains a Systematic Exposition of Mind, a History of the leading Questions in Mental Philosophy, and a copious Dissertation on Ethics. The Exposition of Mind, occupying nearly half the work, is, for the most part, an abridgement of my two volumes on the subject. I have singled out, and put in conspicuous type, the leading positions; and have given a sufficient number of examples to make them understood. It is not to be expected that the full effect of the larger exposition can be produced in the shorter; still, there may be an occasional advantage in the more succinct presentation of complicated doctrines. As regards the Controverted Questions, I have entered fully into the history of opinion, so as to present the different views, both formerly, and at present, entertained on each. Nominalism and Realism, the Origin of Knowledge in the mind, External Perception, Beauty, and Freewill, are the chief subjects thus treated"--Preface. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved)
The minor works of George Grote. With critical remarks on his intellectual character, writings, and speeches by George Grote( Book )
17 editions published between 1873 and 2002 in English and held by 243 libraries worldwide
Mental science by Alexander Bain( Book )
7 editions published between 1868 and 1973 in English and Undetermined and held by 235 libraries worldwide
"The present treatise contains a Systematic Exposition of Mind, and a History of the leading Questions in Mental Philosophy. The Exposition of Mind is, for the most part, an abridgment of my two volumes on the subject. I have singled out, and put in conspicuous type, the leading positions; and have given a sufficient number of examples to make them understood. It is not to be expected that the full effect of the larger exposition can be produced in the shorter; still, there may be an occasional advantage in the more succinct presentation of complicated doctrines. As regards the controverted Questions, I have entered fully into the history of opinion, so as to exhibit the different views, both formerly, and at present, entertained on each. Nominalism and Realism, the Origin of Knowledge in the mind, External Perception, Beauty, and Freewill, are the chief subjects thus treated"--Preface. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved)
Moral science : a compendium of ethics by Alexander Bain( Book )
21 editions published between 1869 and 1888 in English and held by 218 libraries worldwide
Philosophical remains of George Croom Robertson, with a memoir by George Croom Robertson( Book )
14 editions published in 1894 in English and held by 218 libraries worldwide
"The present volume contains a collection of the more important philosophical writings of the late Prof. Groom Robertson. Outside this work, besides his volume on Hobbes, there remain his historical articles in the Encyclopædia Britannica on Abelard and Hobbes, his biographies of the Grotes in the Dictionary of National Biography (George Grote, his wife and two brothers--John and Arthur) and other minor contributions to various periodicals. The memoir is brief and comprehensive rather than minute. It has been somewhat extended by insertions of importance, as will be seen in their places"--Preface. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved)
Practical essays by Alexander Bain( Book )
19 editions published between 1884 and 2011 in English and Undetermined and held by 215 libraries worldwide
Logic deductive and inductive by Alexander Bain( Book )
18 editions published between 1870 and 1889 in English and held by 208 libraries worldwide
"The present work aims at embracing a full course of Logic, both Formal and Inductive. In an introductory chapter, are set forth such doctrines of psychology as have a bearing on Logic, the nature of knowledge in general, and the classification of the sciences; the intention being to avoid doctrinal digressions in the course of the work. Although preparatory to the understanding of what follows, this chapter may be passed over lightly on a first perusal of the work. The part on Deduction contains the usual doctrines of the Syllogism, with the additions of Hamilton, and a full abstract of the novel and elaborate schemes of De Morgan and Boole. The Inductive portion comprises the methods of inductive research, and all those collateral topics brought forward by Mr. Mill, as part of the problem of Induction; various modifications being made in the manner of statement, the order of topics, and the proportion of the handling. The greatest innovation is the rendering of Cause by the new doctrine called the Conservation, Persistence, or Correlation of Force"--Preface. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved)
On the study of character, including an estimate of phrenology by Alexander Bain( Book )
26 editions published between 1861 and 2004 in English and Undetermined and held by 207 libraries worldwide
"The present work is intended, if possible, to reanimate the interest in the analytical study of human character, which was considerably awakened by the attention drawn to phrenology, and which seems to have declined with the comparative neglect of that study at the present time. There is nothing more certain, than that the discriminating knowledge of individual character is a primary condition of much of the social improvement that the present age is panting for. The getting the right man into the right place is mainly a problem of the judgment of character; the mere wish to promote the fitting person is nugatory in the absence of the discrimination"--Preface. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved)
Logic by Alexander Bain( Book )
34 editions published between 1870 and 2008 in English and Undetermined and held by 191 libraries worldwide
Mental science : a compendium of psychology, and the history of philosophy by Alexander Bain( Book )
28 editions published between 1868 and 2006 in English and held by 157 libraries worldwide
A higher English grammar by Alexander Bain( Book )
49 editions published between 1872 and 2005 in English and Undetermined and held by 152 libraries worldwide
 
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Alternative Names
Bain, A.
Bain, A., 1818-1903
Bain, A. (Alexander), 1818-1903
Bain, Alejandro, 1818-1903
Bain, Aleksander.
Bain, Alex.
Bain, Alex., 1818-1903
Bain, Alexander
Bain, Alexandre.
Bain, Alexandre, 1818-1903
Bein
Bein, 1818-1903
Bein, Alexander, 1818-1903
Bein, Arekisanda
Bèn.
Ben, A.
Bėn, A. 1818-1903
Bèn, Aleksander.
Ben, Alexander, 1818-1903
Ben, Arekisanderu
ベイン
ベイン, A
ベイン, アレキサンダー
ベイン, アレキサンドル
ベーン, アレキサンデル
便, 亜勒山得
倍因, 亜歴山
米尹
Languages
English (917)
French (45)
German (2)
Russian (2)
Italian (1)
Spanish (1)
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