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Carlino, Gerald A.

Overview
Works: 25 works in 51 publications in 2 languages and 366 library holdings
Genres: History 
Roles: Editor, Creator
Classifications: HC110.D5, 338.5144
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about Gerald A Carlino
Publications by Gerald A Carlino
Most widely held works by Gerald A Carlino
Economies of scale in manufacturing location : theory and measure by Gerald A Carlino( Book )
15 editions published in 1978 in English and Dutch and held by 287 libraries worldwide
City beautiful by Gerald A Carlino( Computer File )
6 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 21 libraries worldwide
The City Beautiful movement, which in the early 20th century advocated city beautification as a way to improve the living conditions and civic virtues of the urban dweller, had languished by the Great Depression. Today, new urban economic theorists and policymakers are coming to see the provision of consumer leisure amenities as a way to attract population, especially the highly skilled and their employers. However, past studies have provided only indirect evidence of the importance of leisure amenities for urban development. In this paper we propose and validate the number of leisure trips to metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) as a measure of consumers' revealed preferences for local leisure-oriented amenities. Population and employment growth in the 1990s was about 2 percent higher in an MSA with twice as many leisure visits: the third most important predictor of recent population growth in standardized terms. Moreover, this variable does a good job of forecasting out-of-sample growth for the period 2000-2006. "Beautiful cities" disproportionally attracted highly educated individuals and experienced faster housing price appreciation, especially in supply-inelastic markets. Investment by local government in new public recreational areas within an MSA was positively associated with higher subsequent city attractiveness. In contrast to the generally declining trends in the American central city, neighborhoods that were close to "central recreational districts" have experienced economic growth, albeit at the cost of minority displacement
Have regional per-capita incomes converged? by Gerald A Carlino( Book )
2 editions published in 1991 in English and held by 11 libraries worldwide
Common trends and common cycles in regional per capita incomes by Gerald A Carlino( Book )
1 edition published in 1996 in English and held by 11 libraries worldwide
The effects of exchange rate and productivity changes on U.S. industrial output at the state level by Gerald A Carlino( Book )
2 editions published in 1991 in English and held by 11 libraries worldwide
On the stability of employment growth : a postwar view from the U.S. states by Gerald A Carlino( Book )
3 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 4 libraries worldwide
"In 1952, the average quarterly volatility of U.S. state employment growth stood at 1.5 percent. By 1995, employment growth volatility came in at just under 0.5 percent. While all states shared in the decline, some states declined much more dramatically than others. We analyze aspects of this decline using new data covering industry employment by state during the postwar period. Estimates from a pooled cross-section/time-series model corrected for spatial dependence indicate that fluctuations in state-specific and aggregate variables have both played an important role in explaining volatility trends. However, state-level differences in responses to aggregate shocks account for less of the postwar fluctuations in employment growth volatility than do state-specific forces"--Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia web site
Matching and learning in cities : evidence from patent data by Gerald A Carlino( Book )
3 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 4 libraries worldwide
"This paper examines the role of knowledge spillovers on innovations in metropolitan areas. We use patents per capita (patent intensity) in a metropolitan area as a measure of innovation. We find that, after controlling for other factors, patent intensity is positively related to the number of jobs per square mile (employment density) of metropolitan areas. All else equal, patent intensity is about 20 percent higher in a metropolitan area with an employment density twice that of another metropolitan area. Absent congestion effects, since local employment density doubles nearly four times across our sample, the implied gains in patents per capita due to urban density are substantial. Accounting for congestion, we find that a metropolitan area with an employment density of 2,150 jobs per square mile & #151;about the densities of Baltimore (2,168) and Philadelphia (2,181) & #151;optimizes patent intensity. We also find that patent intensity is higher in cities that have a more competitive market structure and that are not too large (e.g., a population of less than 1 million). These findings confirm the widely held view that the nation's densest locations play an important role in creating the flow of ideas that generates innovation and growth"--Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia web site
How strong is co-movement in employment over the business cycle? : evidence from state/industry data by Gerald A Carlino( Book )
2 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 3 libraries worldwide
Knowledge spillovers and the new economy of cities by Gerald A Carlino( Book )
1 edition published in 2001 in English and held by 1 library worldwide
Despite much theorizing about the role of geographic concentration of employment in enhancing knowledge spillovers, local densities' role in promoting innovations has been largely unexamined. This paper considers the role of knowledge spillovers on innovations at the MSA level. The authors use patents per capita in an MSA as their measure of innovations in that MSA. They find that the rate of patenting is positively related to the employment density of the highly urbanized portion of an MSA (its urbanized area). Specifically, the authors find, on average, that rate of patenting is 20 percent to 30 percent greater in an MSA with a local economy that is twice as dense as the local economy of another MSA. Since local employment density doubles more than four times in the sample, the implied gains in patents per capita due to urban density are substantial. Thus, these findings confirm the widely held view that the nation's densest locations play an important role in creating the flow of ideas that generates innovation and growth
The cyclical behavior of state employment during the postwar period by Gerald Carlino( Book )
1 edition published in 2002 in English and held by 1 library worldwide
Postwar trends in metropolitan employment growth : decentralization and deconcentration by Gerald Carlino( Book )
1 edition published in 1999 in English and held by 1 library worldwide
The agglomeration of R&D labs by Gerald A Carlino( Book )
1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 1 library worldwide
The authors document the spatial concentration of more than 1,000 research and development (R&D) labs located in the Northeast corridor of the U.S. using point pattern methods. These methods allow systematic examination of clustering at different spatial scales. In particular, Monte Carlo tests based on Ripley's (1976) K-functions are used to identify clusters of labs -- at varying spatial scales -- that represent statistically significant departures from random locations reflecting the underlying distribution of economic activity (employment). Using global K-functions, they first identify significant clustering of R&D labs at two different spatial scales. This clustering is by far most significant at very small spatial scales (a quarter of a mile), with significance attenuating rapidly during the first half mile. The authors also observe statistically significant clustering at distances of about 40 miles. This corresponds roughly to the size of the four major R&D clusters identified in the second stage of their analysis -- one each in Boston, New York-Northern New Jersey, Philadelphia-Wilmington, and Virginia (including the District of Columbia). In this second stage of the analysis, explicit clusters are identified by a new procedure based on local K-functions, which they designate as the multiscale core-cluster approach. This new approach yields a natural nesting of clusters at different scales. The authors' global finding of clustering at two spatial scales suggests the possibility of two distinct forms of spillovers. First, the rapid attenuation of significant clustering at small spatial scales is consistent with the view that knowledge spillovers are highly localized. Second, the scale at which larger clusters are found is roughly comparable to that of local labor markets, suggesting that such markets may be the source of additional spillovers (e.g., input sharing or labor market matching externalities)
Urban density and the rate of invention by Gerald Carlino( Book )
1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 1 library worldwide
Economists, beginning with Alfred Marshall, have studied the significance of cities in the production and exploitation of information externalities that, today, we call knowledge spillovers. This paper presents robust evidence of those effects. We show that patent intensity the per capita invention rate is positively related to the density of employment in the highly urbanized portion of MAs. All else equal, a city with twice the employment density (jobs per square mile) of another city will exhibit a patent intensity (patents per capita) that is 20 percent higher. Patent intensity is maximized at an employment density of about 2,200 jobs per square mile. A city with a more competitive market structure or one that is not too large (a population less than 1 million) will also have a higher patent intensity. These findings confirm the widely held view that the nation̕̕s densest locations play an important role in creating the flow of ideas that generate innovation and growth
Postwar period changes in employment volatility : New evidence from state/Industry panel data by Gerald Carlino( Book )
1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 1 library worldwide
Innovation across U.S. industries : the effects of local economic characteristics by Gerald A Carlino( Book )
1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 1 library worldwide
This paper extends the research in Carlino, Chatterjee, and Hunt (2007) to examine the effects of local economic characteristics on the rate of innovation (as measured by patents) in more than a dozen industries. The availability of human capital is perhaps the most important factor explaining the invention rate for most industries. The authors find some evidence that higher job market density is associated with more patenting in industries such as pharmaceuticals and computers. They find evidence of increasing returns with respect to city size (total jobs) for many industries and more modest effects for increases in the size of an industry in a city. This suggests that inter-industry spillovers are often at least as important as intra-industry spillovers in explaining local rates of innovation. A more competitive local market structure, characterized by smaller establishments, contributes significantly to patenting in nearly all industries. More often than not, specialization among manufacturing industries is not particularly helpful, but the authors find the opposite for specialization among service industries. Industries benefit from different local sources of R&D (academia, government labs, and private labs) and to varying degrees
The geography of research and development activity in the U.S. by Kristy Buzard( Book )
1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 1 library worldwide
This study details the location patterns of R & D labs in the U.S., but it differs from past studies in a number of ways. First, rather than looking at the geographic concentration of manufacturing firms (e.g., Ellison and Glaeser, 1997; Rosenthal and Strange, 2001; and Duranton and Overman, 2005), the authors consider the spatial concentration of private R & D activity. Second, rather than focusing on the concentration of employment in a given industry, the authors look at the clustering of individual R & D labs by industry. Third, following Duranton and Overman (2005), the authors look for geographic clusters of labs that represent statistically significant departures from spatial randomness using simulation techniques. The authors find that R & D activity for most industries tends to be concentrated in the Northeast corridor, around the Great Lakes, in California's Bay Area, and in southern California. They argue that the high spatial concentration of R & D activity facilitates the exchange of ideas among firms and aids in the creation of new goods and new ways of producing existing goods. They run a regression of an Ellison and Glaeser (1997) style index measuring the spatial concentration of R & D labs on geographic proxies for knowledge spillovers and other characteristics and find evidence that localized knowledge spillovers are important for innovative activity
Sectoral shocks and metropolitan employment growth by Gerald A Carlino( Book )
1 edition published in 2000 in English and held by 1 library worldwide
Dynamics of county growth by Edwin S Mills( Article )
in English and held by 1 library worldwide
IFAE 2007 Incontri Di Fisica Delle Alte Energie Italian Meeting on High Energy Physics by G Carlino( Computer File )
1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 1 library worldwide
This book collects the Proceedings of the Workshop Incontri di Fisica delle Alte Energie (IFAE) 2007, Napoli, 11-13 April 2007."" This is the sixth edition of a series of meetings on fundamental research in particle physics and was attended by about 160 researchers. Presentations, both theoretical and experimental, addressed the status of Physics of the Standard Model and beyond, Flavour phyisc, Neutrino and Astroparticle physics, new technology in high energy physics. Special emphasis was given to the expectations of the forthcoming Large Hadron Collider, due in operation at the end of 2007
What explains the quantity and quality of local inventive activity? by Gerald Carlino( Book )
1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 1 library worldwide
The authors geocode a data set of patents and their citation counts, including citations from abroad. This allows them to examine both the quantity and quality of local inventions. They also refine their data on local academic R & D to explore effects from different fields of science and sources of R & D funding. Finally, they incorporate data on congressional earmarks of funds for academic R & D. With one important exception, results using citation-weighted patents are similar to those using unweighted patents. For example, estimates of the returns to density (jobs per square mile) are only slightly changed when using citation-weighted patents as the dependent variable. But estimates of returns to city size (urbanization effects) are quite sensitive to the choice of dependent variable. Local human capital is the most important determinant of per capita rates of patenting. A 1 percent increase in the adult population with a college degree increases the local patenting rate by about 1 percent. With few exceptions, there is little variation across fields of science in the contribution of academic R & D to patenting rates. The exceptions are computer and life sciences, where the effects are smaller. There is greater variation in the contribution of R & D funded by different sources-academic R & D funded by the federal government generates smaller increases in patenting rates than R & D funded by the university itself. This effect is somewhat stronger for federally funded applied R & D than for basic R & D. The authors also find small negative effects for cities with greater exposure to academic R & D allocated by congressional earmarks. They discuss the implications of these results for policy and future research
 
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Alternative Names
Carlino, G.
Carlino, G. A.
Carlino, Gerald.
Carlino, Gerald A.
Carlino, Jerry.
Languages
English (45)
Dutch (1)
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