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Lepper, Mark R.

Overview
Works: 8 works in 20 publications in 1 language and 801 library holdings
Genres: Cross-cultural studies 
Roles: Editor, Thesis advisor
Classifications: BF319.5.R48, 152.5
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about Mark R Lepper
Publications by Mark R Lepper
Most widely held works by Mark R Lepper
The Hidden costs of reward : new perspectives on the psychology of human motivation by Mark R Lepper( Book )
10 editions published in 1978 in English and held by 706 libraries worldwide
East and West ( visu )
2 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 86 libraries worldwide
"Through careful studies conducted in the U.S., U.K. and East Asia, researchers came to the surprising conclusion that in many aspects, people from the 'East' and people from the 'West' think in diametrically opposite ways. Scientists determined that cultural differences trump theories that the brain's thought processes operate in much the same manner for all people. As cultures and economies become more interwoven, it is increasingly important to understand these differences and how they might affect communication and negotiations in both social and business settings."--Container
Dissonance, self perception, and the generalization of moral behavior by Mark R Lepper( Book )
2 editions published between 1971 and 1979 in English and held by 4 libraries worldwide
Cultural variation in choice and its consequences implications for decision making, victim blaming, and social policies by Krishna Mukundrai Savani( Computer File )
1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 2 libraries worldwide
Choice is one of the most important categories of actions, both in American society in general and in the specific fields of psychology and economics. Extensive research over the past century has examined how people make choices, but the question of whether and when an action counts as a choice remains unstudied. While most scientists assume that whether an action counts as a choice is based upon the objective availability of multiple options, the present research tests whether what counts as a choice is also a matter of construal, a construal that is shaped by cultural models of agency. Studies 1 to 6 find that people in U.S. American contexts, where the disjoint model of agency is prevalent, are more likely than those in Indian contexts, where the conjoint model of agency is prevalent, to construe behaviors as choices. In Study 1, Americans reported making significantly more choices during the day than did Indians. In Studies 2 and 3, after the experimenter subtly induced participants to engage in the same series of behaviors, Americans were again more likely than Indians to construe their actions as choices. In Study 4, while watching a video of an actor spending time in his apartment, Americans identified the actor as making significantly more choices than did Indians. In Studies 5a and 5b, Americans were even more likely and Indians were even less likely to construe more important real life decisions as choices. In Study 6, Indians also showed a greater tendency to construe actions as choices when these actions involved responding to other people than when they did not, but Americans were equally likely to construe personal and interpersonal actions as choices. These findings show that whether people construe actions as choices is significantly shaped by sociocultural systems of meanings and practices. Studies 7 to 12 examined some of the positive and negative consequences of construing actions as choices in American contexts. Based upon the idea that choice and control are key components of the disjoint model of agency, these studies tested whether inducing Americans to construe actions as choices makes them more likely to make personal, interpersonal, and societal decisions under the assumption of personal control. Studies 7 and 8 found that inducing Americans to construe another person's actions as choices led them to make more risk-seeking and ambiguity-seeking decisions, which have been associated in previous research with increased perceived control. Studies 9 and 10 found that inducing Americans to construe another person's actions as choices led them to blame victims of negative life outcomes for making bad choices, reflecting the assumption that people have control over their actions and outcomes. Finally, Studies 11 and 12 found that inducing Americans to construe another person's actions as choices led them to oppose social policies benefiting society at the cost of individual liberty, but to support social policies enhancing individual freedom. Together, these studies document that whether an action counts as a choice is a matter of construal to a significant extent, and whether people construe actions as choices has profound psychological consequences, both positive and negative. The findings suggest that the existing societal trend of framing more and more issues as matters of choice is unlikely to have universally positive consequences, and might also have a variety of unanticipated negative consequences
Dissonance, self-perception, and honesty in children by Mark R Lepper( Book )
1 edition published in 1973 in English and held by 1 library worldwide
Attitude representation theory ( Article )
1 edition published in 1999 in Undetermined and held by 1 library worldwide
The hidden costs or reward : new perspectives on the psychology of human motivation ( Book )
1 edition published in 1978 in English and held by 1 library worldwide
Perspectives on intrinsic motivation ( Book )
2 editions published in 1992 in English and held by 0 libraries worldwide
 
Languages
English (19)
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