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Graduate Theological Union

Overview
Works: 1,196 works in 1,224 publications in 1 language and 1,730 library holdings
Genres: Criticism, interpretation, etc  History  Catalogs  Periodicals  Dissertations, Academic  Cross-cultural studies  Case studies  Film catalogs 
Classifications: BL71, 291.82
Publication Timeline
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Publications about Graduate Theological Union
Publications by Graduate Theological Union
Most widely held works about Graduate Theological Union
 
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Most widely held works by Graduate Theological Union
The Critical study of sacred texts by Wendy Doniger( Book )
3 editions published in 1979 in English and held by 321 libraries worldwide
Sikh studies : comparative perspectives on a changing tradition : working papers from the Berkeley conference on Sikh studies by Mark Juergensmeyer( Book )
2 editions published in 1979 in English and held by 253 libraries worldwide
Terror in the mind of God ( visu )
2 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 7 libraries worldwide
Professor Mark Juergensmeyer talks about his latest book: Terror in the mind of God: the global rise of religious violence. In light of the September 11th acts of terrorism, he discusses how religion has formed the new moral basis for politics and the taking up of arms. He describes the rise of the Taliban as an effect of the collapse in faith in secular religion and the rise in new forms of religious nationalism
Theater in a crowded fire : spirituality, ritualization, and cultural performativity at the Burning Man festival by Lee Gilmore( Archival Material )
2 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 6 libraries worldwide
Ruah ( serial )
in English and held by 5 libraries worldwide
Berkeley religious studies series ( serial )
in English and held by 5 libraries worldwide
Catalog by Graduate Theological Union( serial )
in English and held by 5 libraries worldwide
Ruah ( Book )
1 edition published in 1991 in English and held by 4 libraries worldwide
Rome and Judaea in transition by Christopher Joseph Seeman( Archival Material )
1 edition published in 2002 in English and held by 4 libraries worldwide
Political relations between the Roman Republic and the Hasmonaean dynasty of Judaea form an essential backdrop to the study of Second Temple Judaism. From its inception in 164 BC through the deposition of Antigonos in 37 BC, Rome's involvement in Judaean affairs underwent several dramatic changes, culminating in the Senate's eventual abandonment of the Hasmonaean house in favor of Herod the Great. Explanation of Roman policy toward Judaea requires analysis of two often neglected factors: (1) the larger political and military context in which Rome's representatives operated during this period, and (2) the role played by Jewish initiative in shaping Roman decisions concerning the region. Examination of the literary and documentary evidence reveals that major shifts in the Republic's relationship to Judaea were significantly influenced by these factors. The engulfment of the Near East by the convulsions of Rome's civil war in particular altered the circumstances on which Roman policy toward Judaea was based
The rhetoric of the Talmud in the perspective of post-structuralism by Serguei Boris Dolgopolskii( Archival Material )
1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 4 libraries worldwide
A study on the origin and significance of Borodudur by Hudaya Kandahjaya( Archival Material )
1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 4 libraries worldwide
Gods Who Hear Prayers Popular Piety or Kingship in Three Theban monuments of New Kingdom Egypt by Cindy Lee Ausec( Archival Material )
2 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 3 libraries worldwide
For the past 50 years, Thutmose III's and Ramesses II's Eastern Temples at Karnak and the Eastern High Gate of Ramesses III's mortuary temple at Medinet Habu have been accepted as monuments that fulfilled the religious needs of the general populace of ancient Thebes based on Charles Nims' assessment of these monuments. Thutmose III's Eastern Temple was believed to have been built as "a perfect place of hearing" and the two Ramesside monuments both had representations of a god bearing the title "God who hears prayers." To date there has been no comprehensive study of the context of these three "places of hearing." In this study, I ask and answer the following three questions. 1) How do the two "god who hears prayer" scenes fit into the iconography of their respective temples? 2) How did the iconography of the "places of hearing," i.e., the two Eastern Temples at Karnak and the Eastern High Gate at Medinet Habu, encourage the Theban populace to use them for their the spiritual needs? 3) If the iconography of the Eastern Temples at Karnak and the Eastern High gate at Medinet Habu did not encourage use by the populace, what was their purpose? In Chapter 2, I review the scholarly literature on personal piety and popular religion. Previous works have catalogued sites believed to be loci for personal piety and have studied the archaeological evidence in the form of personal monuments and graffiti. No iconographic studies of the sites, however, have been carried out. In Chapter 3 I examine sites that have yielded textual, iconographic or archaeological evidence of use by the populace in their attempt to contact deities and deified kings to establish a baseline for comparison with the three monuments. In Chapter 4 I present an in-depth analysis of the two Eastern Temples at Karnak and the Eastern High Gate at Medinet Habu. I investigate the relevant textual, iconographic and archaeological evidence for each temple to determine whether any of it relates to personal piety. I discuss the iconographic programs of the Eastern Temples at Karnak, incorporating both their original New Kingdom constructions, as well as later additions. At the Eastern High Gate at Medinet Habu the god "who hears prayer" is not the principle deity of the mortuary temple, the Theban Amun-Re, but rather the Memphite god Ptah. Therefore I discuss the decorative program of the temple proper in addition to the iconographic program of the High Gate. I conclude by demonstrating that the Eastern Temples at Karnak and the Eastern High Gate at Medinet Habu show little to no evidence of serving the religious need of the Theban populace. Instead, a kingship ritual, namely the Sed festival, plays a major role in the decorative programs of all three monuments. In Chapter 5 I discuss the evidence for the Sed festival, the various theories regarding its importance to kingship and its possible link to the king's role as high priest. I also demonstrate the importance of Amun-Re, Ptah and Atum in the Sed festival celebrations of Thutmose III, Ramesses II and Ramesses II. I emphasize that the god who is given preference by the king during his Sed festival(s) is the same deity chosen to be the one "who hears prayer." Finally, I discuss specific aspects that illustrate the king's role as high priest and the divine nature of kingship. I conclude the chapter by demonstrating that the function of these monuments was focused on the cultic role of the king. In my final chapter, Chapter 6, I summarize my evidence and analyses. I reinforce my conclusion that the three monuments I investigated, the two Eastern Temples at Karnak and the Eastern High Gate at Medinet Habu played no role in popular piety. To the contrary they focused on kingship and the king's role as divine high priest
Rhetorical resources for a homiletic of the oppressed : the new homiletics of Fred Craddock and Eugene Lowry and the liberation pedagogy of Paulo Freire by Mauro Batista De Souza( Archival Material )
1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 3 libraries worldwide
Laicization in four Sri Lankan Buddhist temples in northern California by Natalie E. F Quli( Archival Material )
1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 3 libraries worldwide
A select filmography of new religious movements by Graduate Theological Union( Book )
1 edition published in 1977 in English and held by 3 libraries worldwide
Rethinking Protestant nationalism in colonial Korea, 1910-1945 : Chŏng In-gwa and the Christianization of Korea by Youngkeun Choi( Archival Material )
1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 3 libraries worldwide
The sermon in the ordo : toward the recovery of a liturgical homiletic for the reformed tradition by Jennifer Lynn Lord( Archival Material )
1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 3 libraries worldwide
Her veil : the story of the Marian veil in art history from the catacombs up until the Reformation by Katherine Anne Osenga( Archival Material )
1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 3 libraries worldwide
What are we doing here? : local theologies of mission from a shared Catholic parish in the midwest by Brett C Hoover( Archival Material )
1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 3 libraries worldwide
"The demographic transformation of the Roman Catholic Church in the United States by immigration from Latin America, Asia, and the Pacific Islands provides a social context for this study of a shared parish in the Midwestern United States. Shared parishes-where two or more cultures enjoy distinct masses and ministries but share the facilities--constitute a common local response across the United States to this demographic transformation. This dissertation focuses on the single parish in a small city dramatically altered by immigration largely from Mexico. This study of one shared parish makes use of a theological methodology called participatory witness (parWit). It applies community-based research principles (such as in participatory action research, or PAR) to ethnographic and congregational studies research. With the cooperation of parishioners over ten months, this research process elicited theologies of mission elaborated around five themes deemed important to the practical life of the parish in its historical, cultural, and ecclesial context. The themes are: 1) social order, 2) worship, 3) faith formation in the Latino/a community, 4) hospitality in the Euro-American community, and 5) unity and integration. The author refines these themes in dialogue with larger church teaching and theology based on initial reactions to such teaching and theology he previously uncovered in the parish. In contrast to most scholarly studies of "parallel congregations" or "multiethnic congregations," this study focuses attention on the intercultural dynamics that a shared parish creates between its distinct communities. This intercultural focus-as well as an additional attentiveness to peculiarly Catholic connections between local parish and the larger church-demonstrates how the investigation of contemporary Catholic parishes requires frameworks and methodologies beyond those commonly in use in congregational studies. Moreover, this study also articulates a local and practical theology of mission, a still somewhat underappreciated approach to mission within missiology. Finally, it begins to expand upon communion ecclesiology as a language and approach superior to multiculturalism in addressing cultural diversity in the church."--Abstract
 
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Alternative Names
G.T.U.
GTU
Аспирантский богословский союз
Languages
English (49)
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