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Tarr, Joel A. (Joel Arthur) 1934-

Works: 59 works in 151 publications in 1 language and 6,209 library holdings
Genres: History  Case studies  Conference papers and proceedings  Art  Pictorial works  Catalogs  Music 
Roles: Author, Editor, Author of introduction, Other, Honoree
Classifications: E748.L892, 328.730924
Publication Timeline
Publications about Joel A Tarr
Publications by Joel A Tarr
Most widely held works about Joel A Tarr
Most widely held works by Joel A Tarr
A study in boss politics: William Lorimer of Chicago by Joel A Tarr( Book )
4 editions published in 1971 in English and Undetermined and held by 751 libraries worldwide
Focuses on the clash between elite municipal reformers (generally native-American Protestants) and machine politicians with Irish Catholic, Bohemian, and Russian Jewish backgrounds
The search for the ultimate sink : urban pollution in historical perspective by Joel A Tarr( Book )
15 editions published between 1996 and 2001 in English and Undetermined and held by 711 libraries worldwide
Whether it comes by air, by land, or by water, pollution has long plagued the American city. And for just as long, the question of how to deal with urban wastes has taxed the minds of scientists, engineers, and public officials - and the pocketbooks of ordinary citizens. For more than twenty years, Joel A. Tarr has written about the issues of urban pollution. In this collection of his essays, Professor Tarr surveys what technology has done to, and for, the environment of the American city since 1850. In studies ranging from the horse to the railroad, from infrastructure development to industrial and domestic pollution, from the Hudson River to the smokestacks of Pittsburgh, his constant theme is the tension between the production of wastes and the attempts to dispose of them or control them with minimal costs. The Search for the Ultimate Sink: Urban Pollution in Historical Perspective stands alone in its scholarly depth and scope. These essays explore not only the technical solutions to waste disposal, but also the policy issues involved in the trade-offs among public health, environmental quality, and the difficulties and costs of pollution control, and all this against the broader background of changes in civic and professional values. Any reader concerned with the interactive history of technology, the environment, and the American city will find in The Search for the Ultimate Sink an informative and compelling account of pollution problems from the past and a serious guide to urban policies for the future
Explorations in environmental history : essays by Samuel P Hays( Book )
5 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 444 libraries worldwide
Exploration in Environmental History represents four decades of writing from one of the most distinguished scholars in the field of environmental history. Samuel Hays's dedication and research is apparent in every one of these essays, four of which are published here for the first time
Technology and the rise of the networked city in Europe and America ( Book )
5 editions published in 1988 in English and held by 443 libraries worldwide
The horse in the city : living machines in the nineteenth century by Clay McShane( Book )
17 editions published between 2007 and 2011 in English and held by 425 libraries worldwide
In addition to providing an insightful account of life and work in 19th century urban America, 'The Horse in the City' brings us to a richer understanding of how the animal fared in this paved and uncomfortable setting
Devastation and renewal : an environmental history of Pittsburgh and its region by Joel A Tarr( Book )
15 editions published between 2003 and 2005 in English and Undetermined and held by 344 libraries worldwide
"Today, the steel industry that defined Pittsburgh for over a century is virtually gone. The sky is blue, fish swim in the rivers, and the hillsides are green and lush. The people enjoy access to many large public parks and trails." "In Devastation and Renewal, environmental scholars examine Pittsburgh's process of reclamation, as well as how power was used to cause change or prevent it, and who benefited from environmental initiatives and why. The authors assert that there is still a long road ahead for reclamation and conservation. If a lesson may be taken from history, it is that changes will come along circuitous routes as they have before, often springing from self-interest, and obstructed by battles among competing, civic groups, regional and national government agencies, individuals, and corporations."--Jacket
Born of fire--the valley of work : industrial scenes of Southwestern Pennsylvania by Westmoreland Museum of American Art( Book )
3 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 120 libraries worldwide
"This is the first book on the Westmoreland Museum of American Art's extensive collection of paintings, watercolors, drawings, prints, and photographs of the Big Steel Era in Pittsburgh and southwestern Pennsylvania. These images express the immense energy, power, wonder and force of the vast industrial complex that took shape in the mid-nineteenth through the early twentieth-century, a time when Pittsburgh became the nation's foremost center of iron making and mass produced steel."--Jacket
Retrospective technology assessment--1976 by Conference on Retrospective Technology Assessment( Book )
5 editions published in 1977 in English and held by 98 libraries worldwide
Ownership and financing of infrastructure : historical perspectives by Charles David Jacobson( Book )
11 editions published in 1995 in English and held by 78 libraries worldwide
June 1995 History provides many examples of movements both toward and away from private ownership and operation of infrastructure. In France, Great Britain, and the United States, shifts between local, intermediate, and national levels of government in ownership and regulation of some forms of infrastructure have also been common. And spending cycles in all three countries have been marked by bursts of spending followed by periods of retrenchment and stability. Jacobson and Tarr summarize the rich and varied experiences of private and public provision of urban services in France, Great Britain, and the United States over the past 100 years. Their main focus is on experiences in the United States and on shifts back and forth between the public and private sectors. A few of their observations: * The values of politically important actors as well as the working of government, political, and legal institutions have shaped decisions about infrastructure development, the sorts of public goods demanded, and the roles played by private firms. * The range of choices that has historically been made with respect to the ownership, financing, and operation of different infrastructures has been far too varied to be encompassed by simple distinctions between public and private. * Throughout the world, many infrastructures owned and operated by governments have been built by private firms. * In the United States, private firms and property-owners associations of various sorts have owned outright both toll roads and residential streets. Private firms have also collected solid wastes and provided urban transport under a range of franchise, contracting, and regulatory arrangements. The situation with mass transit has been similar in Great Britain. Although water works facilities in France are predominantly government-owned, private firms operate and manage most systems under an array of contracting and leasing arrangements. * Even when facilities have been owned by private firms, direct competition has been of limited importance in the provision of many kinds of infrastructure. But market discipline can arise from other sources. * Privatization can get government bureaucracies out of the business of performing entrepreneurial activities for which they may be poorly suited. When market forces are weak, however, and important public interests are at stake, strengthening government institutions may be a prerequisite for successful privatization. * In the electric utility industry, private firms played a far greater role in U.S. electric utilities than in Great Britain, in part because of different views about appropriate roles for government in providing essential services. For similar reasons, the state played a much larger role in furnishing telecommunications services in France than in the United States. * Beliefs about the publicness of different goods and services have helped shape the character of regulatory, franchise, and contracting arrangements. When a good is seen as mainly private, it is easier for private service providers to be compensated mainly by user fees and for most decisions about price, output, and quality of service to be left to them. But for goods viewed as public and subsidized by taxes, government agencies make many decisions about price, output, and quality, no matter what the role played by private firms in actually providing services. * Goods defined as public have often been provided free to users, even though it would have been easy to exclude nonpayers. Examples in the United States include interstate highway systems, public parks, public libraries, and police and fire protection. Free services have been provided because it is believed that in these domains market relationships should not apply -- and that denying nonpayers the public service would be a denial of rights. * In Great Britain and the United States, the contracting out of public services has been both supported and opposed because of its potential to break the power of public sector unions and to cut workers' pay. In the United States, privatization has also come under attack on the grounds that opportunities for minority employment may be reduced. This paper -- a product of the Office of the Vice President, Development Economics -- is a background paper for World Development Report 1994 on infrastructure
Transportation innovation and changing spatial patterns in Pittsburgh, 1850-1934 by Joel A Tarr( Book )
1 edition published in 1978 in English and held by 55 libraries worldwide
Infrastructure and urban growth in the nineteenth century ( Book )
1 edition published in 1985 in English and held by 52 libraries worldwide
Patterns in city growth by Joel A Tarr( Book )
3 editions published in 1975 in English and held by 27 libraries worldwide
Pittsburgh-Sheffield sister cities : proceedings of the Pittsburgh-Sheffield Symposium on Industrial Cities, Pittsburgh, Pa., November 1981 by Pittsburgh-Sheffield Symposium on Industrial Cities( Book )
2 editions published in 1986 in English and held by 26 libraries worldwide
Retrospective assessment of wastewater technology in the United States: 1800-1972 by Joel A Tarr( Book )
5 editions published between 1977 and 1978 in English and held by 18 libraries worldwide
Transportation innovation and changing spatial patterns: Pittsburgh, 1850-1910 by Joel A Tarr( Book )
5 editions published in 1972 in English and held by 17 libraries worldwide
Born of fire : how Pittsburgh built a nation ( visu )
1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 10 libraries worldwide
Examines the crucial role played by Pittsburgh steelworkers in U.S. history, focusing on the Homestead strike of 1892. Features art from the Westmoreland Museum of American Art and the songs of the NewLanders
Accidents in history : injuries, fatalities, and social relations by Roger Cooter( Book )
1 edition published in 1997 in English and held by 10 libraries worldwide
William Lorimer of Illinois a study in the Boss politics by Joel A Tarr( Archival Material )
3 editions published between 1963 and 1971 in English and held by 7 libraries worldwide
The city and technology ( Book )
1 edition published in 1979 in English and held by 5 libraries worldwide
Coal, Smoke, and Death Bituminous Coal and American Home Heating by Alan Barreca( Book )
2 editions published in 2014 in English and held by 1 library worldwide
Air pollution was severe in many urban areas of the United States in the first half of the twentieth century, in part due to the burning of bituminous coal for heat. We estimate the effects of this bituminous coal consumption on mortality rates in the U.S. during the mid 20th century. Coal consumption varied considerably during the 20th century due to coal-labor strikes, wartime oil and gas restrictions, and the expansion of gas pipelines, among other reasons. To mitigate the influence of confounding factors, we use a triple-differences identification strategy that relies on variation in coal consumption at the state-year-season level. It exploits the fact that coal consumption for heating was highest in the winter and uses within-state changes in mortality in non-winter months as an additional control group. Our estimates suggest that reductions in the use of bituminous coal for heating between 1945 and 1960 decreased winter all-age mortality by 1.25 percent and winter infant mortality by 3.27 percent, saving 1,923 all age lives per winter month and 310 infant lives per winter month. Our estimates are likely to be a lower bound, since they primarily capture short-run relationships between coal and mortality
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Alternative Names
Joel A. Tarr
Tarr, Joel A.
Tarr, Joel Arthur
Tarr, Joel Arthur 1934-
English (102)
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