skip to content

Brechling, Frank P. R.

Overview
Works: 22 works in 95 publications in 3 languages and 2,554 library holdings
Genres: Conference papers and proceedings 
Roles: Author, Editor, Other
Classifications: HB539, 332.67
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about Frank P. R Brechling
Publications by Frank P. R Brechling
Most widely held works by Frank P. R Brechling
The theory of interest rates; proceedings of a conference held by the International Economic Association by International Economic Association( Book )
45 editions published between 1965 and 1986 in 4 languages and held by 688 libraries worldwide
Investment and employment decisions by Frank P. R Brechling( Book )
11 editions published in 1975 in English and Undetermined and held by 255 libraries worldwide
Permanent job loss and the U.S. system of financing unemployment insurance by Frank P. R Brechling( Book )
6 editions published between 1994 and 1995 in English and Undetermined and held by 144 libraries worldwide
Evaluating tax systems for financing the unemployment insurance program by Marianne Bowes( Book )
4 editions published in 1980 in English and held by 132 libraries worldwide
PRI conducted a study for the National Commission on Unemployment compensation to help UI administrators evaluate tax systems and predict how changes in tax systems would change fund balances. Several models of UI tax systems were developed, and their predictive power was tested. The best models were used to predict fund balances under a variety of hypothetical tax systems. The adequacy of fund balances was also evaluated. Federal administrators now consider a fund adequate if the balance is a specified multiple of annual wages 'at the beginning of a period of relatively high unemployment.' Aside from the difficulty of determining when 'relatively high unemployment' begins, this measure treats solvency as the only criterion for evaluating fund balances. States can keep their funds solvent by maintaining arbitrarily high balances or by raising taxes immediately when benefit outflows start to rise, but neither method is desirable. Very high balances represent idle funds that could have been used productively by the employers who pay unemployment insurance taxes and raising taxes when benefit outflows begin to rise means high taxes in a recession. To reflect the actual--often competing--goals of UI fund managers, the study team evaluated UI tax systems by three criteria: the mean balance, the probability of insolvency, and the timing of the tax over the business cycle. A good tax system will produce a fund with a low mean balance and a low probability of insolvency, and will raise taxes in a boom rather than in a recession
Older workers in the market for part-time employment by James Jondrow( Book )
3 editions published in 1983 in English and held by 11 libraries worldwide
This paper examines the sources and policy implications of the sparsity of part-time work among older workers. One starting point is the contradiction between expectation -- that the transition out of the labor force will be gradual by means of part-time work -- and what appears to be the reality -- that retirement is sudden. Another starting point is the perception of older workers that part-time work at their current wage is scarce. We begin by reviewing evidence from a number of data sets indicating that, despite statements by older workers that they have a strong interest in part-time work, in most cases retirement is sudden. The country's limited number of partial retirees are concentrated in a few industries (agriculture, service, finance/insurance/real estate). Partial retirement is rare in manufacturing, public utilities, and government. Workers approaching retirement age are not spread evenly across industries. Construction, transportation, and finance/insurance/real estate have a high-than-average proportion. The industries that retain the highest proportion of older workers are trade and government. The industries that accept older workers most readily from other industries are agriculture and trade
The tax base of the U.S. unemployment insurance tax : an empirical analysis by Frank P. R Brechling( Book )
3 editions published in 1978 in English and held by 5 libraries worldwide
In the United States unemployment insurance benefit payments are financed predominantly by taxes on employers' payrolls. The base of this tax is not the actual but the taxable payroll. Typically the taxable payroll is much less than the actual payroll. Further, theoretical reasoning has led to the prediction that the taxable payroll should rise with (1) labor turnover, (2) wages and (3) the taxable wage base, which is the limit up to which a person's earnings are treated as taxable earnings. In this paper, the determination of the taxable payroll is examined from an empirical point of view. The results lend substantial support to the theoretical formulation ... Econometrics, Income, Insurance, Taxes, Unemployment, Unemployment insurance
Wage inflation and the structure of regional unemployment by Frank P. R Brechling( Book )
2 editions published in 1972 in English and held by 3 libraries worldwide
The unemployment insurance tax and labor turnover : further empirical results by Frank P. R Brechling( Book )
2 editions published in 1979 in English and held by 3 libraries worldwide
The research reported here is an extension of a previous enquiry by Brechling and Jehn into the relationships between labor turnover and the unemployment insurance tax. First, the data base was extended through 1977, and the original models were re-estimated. The original and enlarged data sets yielded similar conclusions. Second, the influence of the taxable wage base of the social security tax upon labor turnover was examined. This taxable wage base seems to have a different impact from that of the taxable wage base of the unemployment insurance tax. Third, the relationships between the seasonal pattern of labor turnover and the unemployment insurance tax were examined. The results tended to be weak. Viewed as a whole, the results of the new investigation are not as strong as the original ones, but they do support the conclusion that there are significant relationships between labor turnover and the parameters of the unemployment insurance tax. (Author)
Monetary policy and neo-classical investment analysis by Frank P. R Brechling( Book )
2 editions published in 1972 in English and held by 3 libraries worldwide
A Time Series Analysis of Labor Turnover by Frank P. R Brechling( Book )
2 editions published in 1976 in English and held by 2 libraries worldwide
In the research underlying this paper an attempt was made to estimate the displacements and unreplaced attritions that must be expected to occur as a result of exogenous reductions in the demand for an industry's output. Such reductions may be caused by many factors, including trade liberalization measures and the ensuing increase in import penetration, the effects of which are of particular interest in the present context. This paper provides the theoretical framework of the analysis, a description of the time series data, and the result of the construction, estimation, and simulation of the model. The main conclusion is that unreplaced attritions may not be as important in bringing about net reductions in employment as is sometimes suggested. Although firms cut their new hires drastically when demand falls, this is largely caused and offset by substantial reductions in voluntary quits. In other words, since attritions fall with demand conditions, attempts by firms to effect net reductions in employment through unreplaced attritions tend to have only limited success and the primary method of reducing employment takes the form of displacements
An evaluation of UI funds by Marianne Bowes( Book )
1 edition published in 1981 in English and held by 2 libraries worldwide
The incentive effects of the U.S. unemployment insurance tax by Frank P. R Brechling( Book )
2 editions published in 1975 in English and held by 2 libraries worldwide
The unemployment insurance tax and labor turnover : an empirical analysis by Frank P. R Brechling( Book )
2 editions published in 1978 in English and held by 2 libraries worldwide
In the United States, unemployment insurance benefits are financed predominantly by a payroll tax on employers. The tax system has several features which give employers incentives to change their labor turnover patterns, especially their layoff patterns. In this paper, some theoretical relationships between the parameters of the tax structure and labor turnover are examined empirically. The results are quite encouraging. The evidence suggests that most parameters of the tax structure have the theoretically predicted impact on labor turnover
Unemployment Insurance and Firm Size by Marianne Bowes( Book )
2 editions published in 1985 in English and held by 2 libraries worldwide
State unemployment insurance (UI) systems impose taxes on employers that are used to finance benefit payments to laid-off workers. UI taxes are experience rated, but only imperfectly. Some firms are therefore able to avoid paying for the benefits their laid-off employees receive. In fact, some groups of firms may systematically be subsidized by others, by persistently paying less in taxes than their former employees collect in benefits. The research discussed here has two primary goals. The first is to investigate the extent of cross-subsidization in present UI systems among firms of different size. The second goal is to estimate how small and large firms would be affected by various proposed reforms of these systems. The empirical work is based on administrative records of UI systems in three states-California, Delaware, and Texas. The statistical data were used to measure the subsidy (UI) benefits minus taxes) for firms of different size and to estimate how the subsidy would change if various UI parameters were changed. Keywords: tables(data). (Author)
Taxes and Inflation ( Book )
1 edition published in 1979 in English and held by 1 library worldwide
This paper contains the results of a preliminary investigation into the role that taxes may have played in the inflationary process of the past two decades. Such an analysis seems timely, because the proportion of GNP devoted to taxes has been rising fairly steadily since 1950. Moreover, not much attention has been paid in the literature to taxes in the possible role as causes of inflationary pressures. In recent macroeconomic textbooks, taxes have been analyzed in a predominantly Keynesian framework, in which taxes are determinants of aggregate demand. Accordingly, increases in taxes lead to reductions in aggregate demand and, hence, their impact tends to be deflationary. But aggregate supply remains completely unaffected by changes in taxes
Older Workers in the Market for Part-Time Employment. Appendices to PP 396 ( Book )
1 edition published in 1983 in English and held by 1 library worldwide
This report contains Appendices to PP 396: Older Workers in the Market for Part-Time Employment. Contents include: A general equilibrium theory of hours and compensation per hour; Evidence of the part-time penalty; An empirical inquiry into the relationship between hours worked and compensation; Policy analysis; and The age compensation of different industries
A model of labor adjustment in transition economics with special application to Algeria by Elizabeth Ruppert( Archival Material )
1 edition published in 1999 in English and held by 1 library worldwide
Layoffs and Unemployment Insurance by Frank P. R Brechling( Book )
1 edition published in 1979 in English and held by 1 library worldwide
The starting point of this analysis was the Baily-Feldstein model according to which both layoffs and average hours worked increase with (1) increases in unemployment benefits and (2) decreases in the degree of experience rating of the unemployment insurance tax. This model has been extended by letting the layoff duration be endogenous and by parameterizing experience rating. The empirical examination of the relationship between layoffs, rehires, hours and unemployment duration as dependent variables and the parameters of the unemployment insurance system as explanatory variables has yielded very encouraging results. The strongest impact is that of NEGTAX, the tax rate which applies to firms with a negative balance in the unemployment insurance fund. A rise in NEGTAX reduces layoffs, rehires, hours and unemployment duration. Increases in NEGTAX tend to reduce strongly both layoffs and unemployment duration. The approximate elasticities of these two relationships are .55 and .21 respectively so that a rise in NEGTAX of 10% (from, say, 3.4 to 3.74) might reduce layoff unemployment by as much as 7%. Increases in NEGTAX would improve the financial viability of the unemployment insurance system since tax inflows would rise and benefit outflows would fall because of the reduced layoff unemployment
Taxes on Factors of Production: Their Effects on Factor Proportions and Inflation ( Book )
1 edition published in 1979 in English and held by 1 library worldwide
In the last 25 to 30 years, payroll taxes and subsidies for investment have substantially altered relative factor prices facing firms. This paper presents theoretical and empirical findings on how these taxes and subsidies have affected long-run factor substitution in U.S. manufacturing industries and the short-run effects of payroll taxes on inflation in the economy as a whole. Neoclassical theory suggests that payroll taxes and investment subsidies will lead to substitution of capital for labor in production. In the analysis of factor substitution, quarterly time series data were used to estimate factor demand equations. The empirical results were mixed. The effects of input prices on the demand for factors were strong and in the expected direction. The tax variables were not found to have uniformly strong effects, although some results do support the neoclassical theory of factor demand. The analysis of labor supply focuses on participation, the dimension of supply displaying the most noncyclical variation. For males, participation was closely related to the likelihood of finding a job, as measured by the ratio of employment to labor force; but effects were not found for other variables, including the real wage rate. For females, the real wage rate was a determinant of participation as well as the probability of finding employment was a determinant of participation. For neither sex was a robust relationship found between the Social Security tax variables and labor supply ... Costs, Econometrics, Economic models, Industrial production, Inflation(Economics), Investments, Labor supply, Manufacturing, Taxes
 
moreShow More Titles
fewerShow Fewer Titles
Alternative Names
Brechling, F. P. R.
Brechling, F. P. R. (Frank P. R.)
Brechling, Frank
Languages
English (82)
Spanish (4)
French (2)
Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.