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Project Air Force (U.S.)

Overview
Works: 1,049 works in 2,004 publications in 1 language and 158,227 library holdings
Genres: History 
Roles: Researcher, Editor, Other, Publisher
Publication Timeline
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Publications about Project Air Force (U.S.)
Publications by Project Air Force (U.S.)
Most widely held works about Project Air Force (U.S.)
 
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Most widely held works by Project Air Force (U.S.)
NATO's air war for Kosovo : a strategic and operational assessment by Benjamin S Lambeth( Book )
6 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 303 libraries worldwide
"This book offers a thorough appraisal of Operation Allied Force, NATO's 78-day air war to compel the president of Yugoslavia, Slobodan Milosevic, to end his campaign of "ethnic cleansing" in Kosovo. The author sheds light both on the operation's strengths and on its most salient weaknesses. He outlines the key highlights of the air war and examines the various factors that interacted to induce Milosevic to capitulate when he did. He then explores air power's most critical accomplishments in Operation Allied Force as well as the problems that hindered the operation both in its planning and in its execution. Finally, he assesses Operation Allied Force from a political and strategic perspective, calling attention to those issues that are likely to have the greatest bearing on future military policymaking. The book concludes that the air war, although by no means the only factor responsible for the allies' victory, certainly set the stage for Milosevic's surrender by making it clear that he had little to gain by holding out. It concludes that in the end, Operation Allied Force's most noteworthy distinction may lie in the fact that the allies prevailed despite the myriad impediments they faced."--Rand abstracts
Going global? : U.S. government policy and the defense aerospace industry ( Book )
3 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 214 libraries worldwide
Since the end of the Cold War, a dramatic decline in overall defense authorizations has led both the U.S. aerospace industry and that of Europe to undergo extensive consolidation -- a trend that has led in turn to a significant growth in cross-border business relationships. Yet while globalization has the potential to increase competition, foster innovation, encourage fair pricing, and promote interoperability among NATO allies, it also poses potential challenges, particularly with regard to the proliferation of advanced U.S.-developed military technologies. Accordingly, this report examines aerospace industry globalization trends with a view toward determining how and to what extent globalization can best be managed to further the U.S. Air Force's economic and political-military objectives while minimizing possible risks. The report confirms that the recent proliferation of cross-border business relationships has significant potential to promote allied standardization while simultaneously reducing costs. At the same time, however, enduring concerns over technology transfer issues, together with the increasing competitiveness of European and other multinational firms, may well undermine standardization efforts by encouraging the formulation of indigenous solutions. The authors conclude that further research is needed to fully clarify the manner in which the Air Force should respond to the continued consolidation and globalization of the aerospace industry
Air power as a coercive instrument by Daniel Byman( Book )
5 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 207 libraries worldwide
Coercion--the use of threatened force to induce an adversary to change its behavior--is a critical function of the U.S. military. U.S. forces have recently fought in the Balkans, the Persian Gulf, and the Horn of Africa to compel recalcitrant regimes and warlords to stop repression, abandon weapons programs, permit humanitarian relief, and otherwise modify their actions. Yet despite its overwhelming military might, the United States often fails to coerce successfully. This report examines the phenomenon of coercion and how air power can contribute to its success. Three factors increase the likelihood of successful coercion: (1) the coercer's ability to raise the costs it imposes while denying the adversary the chance to respond (escalation dominance); (2) an ability to block an adversary's military strategy for victory; and (3) an ability to magnify third-party threats, such as internal instability or the danger posed by another enemy. Domestic political concerns (such as casualty sensitivity) and coalition dynamics often constrain coercive operations and impair the achievement of these conditions. Air power can deliver potent and credible threats that foster the above factors while neutralizing adversary countercoercive moves. When the favorable factors are absent, however, air power--or any other military instrument--will probably fail to coerce. Policymakers' use of coercive air power under inauspicious conditions diminishes the chances of using it elsewhere when the prospects of success would be greater
Economic dimensions of security in Central Asia by Sergej Mahnovski( Book )
8 editions published between 2006 and 2007 in English and held by 166 libraries worldwide
This report assesses the economic dimensions of security in post-Soviet Central Asia and considers their implications for the role of the United States. The September 11, 2001, attacks on the United States led to the realization among policymakers that instability, failed and failing states, and economic and political underdevelopment present security concerns not just to the states that suffer directly from these problems but to the global community as a whole. In this regard, Central Asia may be at a crossroads, as demonstrated by the so-called "Tulip Revolution" in Kyrgyzstan and the unrest
Lean logistics : high-velocity logistics infrastructure and the C-5 Galaxy by Timothy L Ramey( Book )
2 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 164 libraries worldwide
"This report considers the effects of radically reducing the time required to move and repair aircraft on operation of the C-5 Galaxy airlift aircraft. It is part of a body of research defining and evaluating the concept of Lean Logistics for the U.S. Air Force. The analysis uses Air Force data to drive simulations of C-5 logistics operations and considers peacetime flying programs. This study finds that a high-velocity infrastructure would provide C-5 performance that is the same as or better than that provided by the current infrastructure across a wide range of conditions and circumstances. A high-velocity infrastructure would require only one-sixth the amount of inventory at one-third the cost of the current infrastructure."--Rand website
Central Asia and its Asian neighbors : security and commerce at the crossroads by Rollie Lal( Book )
6 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 162 libraries worldwide
China, Iran, Afghanistan, India, and Pakistan are critical players in the security and economic issues that will determine the future of Central Asia and affect U.S. interests in the region. By assessing the developing relations between Central Asia and its neighbors, it is evident that each country stands to benefit from stability and economic growth in Central Asia, but opinion toward U.S. presence and policy in the region could be a point of conflict
Pakistan : can the United States secure an insecure state? ( Book )
4 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 154 libraries worldwide
Describing Pakistan's likely future course, this book seeks to inform U.S. efforts to achieve an effective foreign policy strategy toward the country. The book forms an empirical analysis of developments in Pakistan and an assessment of the effectiveness of U.S. policy as of August 2009. Drawing on interviews of elites, polling data, and statistical data on Pakistan's armed forces, the book presents a political and political-military analysis. Primary data and analyses from Pakistanis and international economic organizations are used in the book's demographic and economic analyses. The book assesses Pakistan's own policies, based on similar sources, on government documents, and on the authors' close reading of the assessments of several outside observers. The book also discusses U.S. policy regarding Pakistan, which was based on interviews with U.S. policymakers and on U.S. policy documents. The policy recommendations are based on an assessment of the findings in all these areas. The book concludes with a number of recommendations for the U.S. government and the U.S. Air Force concerning how the United States could forge a broad yet effective relationship with this complicated state. --Publisher description
Troubled partnership : U.S.-Turkish relations in an era of global geopolitical change by F. Stephen Larrabee( Book )
6 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 137 libraries worldwide
A strong security partnership with Turkey has been an important element of U.S. policy for the last five decades. However, in the last few years, U.S.-Turkish relations have seriously deteriorated, and today they are badly in need of repair. The arrival of a new administration in Washington presents an important opportunity to put Washington's relations with Ankara on a firmer footing. Turkey plays a critical role in four areas of increasing strategic importance to the United States: the Balkans, Central Asia and the Caucasus, the Middle East, and the Persian Gulf. In each of these areas, Ankara's cooperation is vital to achieving U.S. policy objectives
Iran's nuclear future : critical U.S. policy choices by Lynn E Davis( Book )
7 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 109 libraries worldwide
As Iran's nuclear program continues to evolve, U.S. decisionmakers will confront a series of critical policy choices involving complex considerations and policy trade-offs. These policy choices could include dissuading Iran from developing nuclear weapons and deterring Iran from using its nuclear weapons, if it were to acquire them. To be successful, the United States will need to find ways to influence Iran's calculations of costs and benefits as Iran pursues its national security interests (survival of the regime, protection of the homeland, and expansion of its regional influence). The United States will also need to reassure its partners in the region of the credibility of the U.S. deterrent posture so as to reduce the Gulf Cooperation Council states' potential interest in developing their own nuclear weapons and dissuade Israel from pursuing unilateral military actions or openly declaring its nuclear posture. The U.S. Air Force, supporting combatant commanders, will play a prominent role in implementing the policy choices, and so it needs to prepare by understanding the goals and timelines of potential military tasks and by designing exercises and war games to support different policy choices
Special operations forces and elusive enemy ground targets : lessons from Vietnam and the Persian Gulf War by William Rosenau( Book )
3 editions published between 2001 and 2002 in English and held by 8 libraries worldwide
In the Vietnam War and the Persian Gulf conflict, special operations forces (SOF) conducted reconnaissance operations to locate hidden targets when political and other considerations prevented the deployment of conventional ground units and air power alone was unable to locate and eliminate elusive objectives. In Vietnam, SOF teams crossed the border into Laos to search for truck parks, storage depots, and other assets along the Ho Chi Minh Trail that were obscured by jungle canopy and camouflage. In western Iraq, British and American SOF patrolled vast areas searching for mobile Scud launchers. In both cases, the nature of the terrain combined with adversary countermeasures made it extremely difficult for ground teams to achieve their objectives. There are a number of implications for future operations. Although new technology, such as mini- and micro-unmanned aerial vehicles, may make it easier to teams to reconnoiter wide areas, using SOF in this fashion is unlikely to achieve U.S. objectives. Concerns about casualties and prisoners of war are likely to limit the use of SOF to the most vital national interests. However, unattended ground sensors could play an enhanced role in future operations. Although most will be delivered by air, some will require hand emplacement in difficult enemy terrain, a mission well suited to SOF. SOF in a battle damage assessment role could help ensure that critical targets have been destroyed. Finally, SOF might disable, destroy, or recover nuclear, biological, or chemical weapons
Toxic warfare by Theodore William Karasik( Book )
2 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 3 libraries worldwide
Since the 1990s there has been an increase in the use of toxic weapons; for example, inexpensive and easily acquired chemicals and industrial waste. This work examines the implications of toxic weapon use for military planning and concludes that such weapons merit further analysis
The Iraq effect : the Middle East after the Iraq War by Frederic M Wehrey( file )
1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 0 libraries worldwide
The conflict in Iraq has reverberated across the Middle East, affecting the balance of power between neighboring states, their internal political dynamics, how their publics view American credibility, and the strategies and tactics of al-Qa'ida. No matter how the internal situation in Iraq evolves, its effects on the broader region will be felt for decades, presenting new challenges and opportunities for U.S. policy. A better understanding of how regional states and nonstate actors have responded to the Iraq conflict will better prepare the United States to manage the war's long-term consequences. To that end, the authors conducted extensive fieldwork in the region and canvassed local media sources to inform their analysis. Among their key findings: The war has facilitated the rise of Iranian power in the region, but Iran faces more limits than is commonly acknowledged; the war has eroded local confidence in U.S. credibility and created new opportunities for Chinese and Russian involvement; the war has entrenched and strengthened neighboring Arab regimes while diminishing the momentum for political reform; and the war has eroded al-Qa'ida's standing in the region, but the network and its affiliates are adapting with new tactics and strategies
 
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Alternative Names
P.A.F. (Project Air Force)
PAF (Project Air Force)
Project Air Force
Project Air Force (Rand Corporation)
Rand Corporation Project Air Force
RAND Project Air Force
Languages
English (68)
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