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Campbell, John Y.

Overview
Works: 174 works in 1,036 publications in 2 languages and 9,238 library holdings
Genres: Conference proceedings 
Roles: Editor
Classifications: HG230.3, 339.53
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about John Y Campbell
Publications by John Y Campbell
Most widely held works by John Y Campbell
Asset prices and monetary policy by John Y Campbell( file )
12 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 1,546 libraries worldwide
Economic growth, low inflation, and financial stability are among the most important goals of policy makers, and central banks such as the Federal Reserve are key institutions for achieving these goals. In Asset Prices and Monetary Policy, leading scholars and practitioners probe the interaction of central banks, asset markets, and the general economy to forge a new understanding of the challenges facing policy makers as they manage an increasingly complex economic system. The contributors examine how central bankers determine their policy prescriptions with reference to the fluctuating housin
Risk aspects of investment-based social security reform by John Y Campbell( file )
14 editions published between 2000 and 2009 in English and held by 1,268 libraries worldwide
Our current social security system operates on a pay-as-you-go basis; benefits are paid almost entirely out of current revenues. As the ratio of retirees to taxpayers increases, concern about the high costs of providing benefits in a pay-as-you-go system has led economists to explore other options. One involves "prefunding," in which a person's withholdings are invested in financial instruments, such as stocks and bonds, the eventual returns from which would fund his or her retirement. The risks such a system would introduce--such as the volatility in the market prices of investment assets--are the focus of this offering from the NBER. Exploring the issues involved in measuring risk and developing models to reflect the risks of various investment-based systems, economists evaluate the magnitude of the risks that both retirees and taxpayers would assume. The insights that emerge show that the risk is actually moderate relative to the improved return, as well as being balanced by the ability of an investment-based system to adapt to differences in individual preferences and conditions
The econometrics of financial markets by John Y Campbell( Book )
19 editions published between 1997 and 2011 in English and held by 833 libraries worldwide
This graduate-level textbook is intended for PhD students, advanced MBA students, and industry professionals interested in the econometrics of financial modeling. The book covers the entire spectrum of empirical finance, including the predictability of asset returns, tests of the random walk hypothesis, the microstructure of securities markets, event analysis, the Capital Asset Pricing Model and the Arbitrage Pricing Theory, the term structure of interest rates, dynamic models of economic equilibrium, and nonlinear financial models such as ARCH, neural networks, statistical fractals, and chaos theory
Strategic asset allocation : portfolio choice for long-term investors by John Y Campbell( Book )
30 editions published between 2001 and 2004 in English and Spanish and held by 568 libraries worldwide
This volume offers a scientific foundation for the advice offered by financial planners to long-term investors. It gives statistical evidence on asset return behaviour, and, based on assumed investor objectives, derives optimal portfolio rules
Estimating the real rate of return on stocks over the long term papers by John Y Campbell( file )
1 edition published in 2001 in English and held by 227 libraries worldwide
Dispersion and volatility in stock returns : an empirical investigation by John Y Campbell( Book )
17 editions published between 1998 and 1999 in English and held by 109 libraries worldwide
Abstract: This paper studies three different measures of monthly stock market volatility: the time-series volatility of daily market returns within the month; the cross-sectional volatility or 'dispersion' of daily returns on industry portfolios, relative to the market, within the month; and the dispersion of daily returns on individual firms, relative to their industries, within the month. Over the period 1962-97 there has been a noticeable increase in firm-level volatility relative to market volatility. All the volatility measures move together in a countercyclical fashion. While market volatility tends to lead the other volatility series, industry-level volatility is a particularly important leading indicator for the business cycle
Who should buy long-term bonds? by John Y Campbell( Book )
21 editions published between 1998 and 2001 in English and held by 101 libraries worldwide
Abstract: According to conventional wisdom, long-term bonds are appropriate for long-term investors who value stability of income. We develop a model of optimal consumption and portfolio choice for infinitely-lived investors facing stochastic interest rates, solve it using an approximate analytical method, and evaluate the conventional wisdom. We show that the demand for long-term bonds has both a myopic component and an intertemporal hedging component. As risk aversion increases, the myopic component shrinks to zero but the hedging component does not. An infinitely risk-averse investor who is infinitely unwilling to substitute consumption intertemporally should hold a portfolio of long-term indexed bonds that is equivalent to an indexed perpetuity. This portfolio finances a riskless consumption stream and in this sense provides a stable income. We calibrate our model to postwar US data and compare consumption and portfolio rules with and without bond indexation, portfolio constraints, and the possibility of investment in equities. We find that when indexed bonds are not available, inflation risk leads investors to shorten their bond portfolios and increase their precautionary savings. This has serious welfare costs for conservative investors, who are much better off when they have the opportunity to buy indexed bonds. We also find that the ratio of bonds to equities in the optimal portfolio increases with the coefficient of relative risk aversion, which is consistent with conventional portfolio advice but inconsistent with the mutual fund theorem of static portfolio analysis. Our results illustrate the general point that static portfolio choice models should not be used to study the dynamic problems facing long-term investors
Foreign currency for long-term investors by John Y Campbell( Book )
18 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 95 libraries worldwide
Abstract: Conventional wisdom holds that conservative investors should avoid exposure to foreign currency risk. Even if they hold foreign equities, they should hedge the currency exposure of these positions and should hold only domestic Treasury bills. This paper argues that the conventional wisdom may be wrong for long-term investors. Domestic bills are risky for long-term investors, because real interest rates vary over time and bills must be rolled over at uncertain future interest rates. This risk can be hedged by holding foreign currency if the domestic currency tends to depreciate when the domestic real interest rate falls, as implied by the theory of uncovered interest parity. Empirically this effect is important and can lead conservative long-term investors to hold more than half their wealth in foreign currency
Asset prices, consumption, and the business cycle by John Y Campbell( Book )
12 editions published between 1998 and 1999 in English and held by 94 libraries worldwide
Abstract: This paper reviews the behavior of financial asset prices in relation to consumption. The paper lists some important stylized facts that characterize US data, and relates them to recent developments in equilibrium asset pricing theory. Data from other countries are examined to see which features of the US experience apply more generally. The paper argues that to make sense of asset market behavior one needs a model in which the market price of risk is high, time-varying, and correlated with the state of the economy. Models that have this feature, including models with habit-formation in utility, heterogeneous investors, and irrational expectations, are discussed. The main focus is on stock returns and short-term real interest rates, but bond returns are also considered
A multivariate model of strategic asset allocation by John Y Campbell( Book )
21 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 94 libraries worldwide
Abstract: Much recent work has documented evidence for predictability of asset returns. We show how such predictability can affect the portfolio choices of long-lived investors who value wealth not for its own sake but for the consumption their wealth can support. We develop an approximate solution method for the optimal consumption and portfolio choice problem of an infinitely-lived investor with Epstein-Zin utility who faces a set of asset returns described by a vector autoregression in returns and state variables. Empirical estimates in long-run annual and postwar quarterly US data suggest that the predictability of stock returns greatly increases the optimal demand for stocks. The role of nominal bonds in long-term portfolios depends on the importance of real interest rate risk relative to other sources of risk. We extend the analysis to consider long-term inflation-indexed bonds and find that these bonds greatly increase the utility of conservative investors, who should hold large positions when they are available
By force of habit : a consumption-based explanation of aggregate stock market behavior by John Y Campbell( Book )
18 editions published between 1994 and 1998 in English and held by 92 libraries worldwide
Abstract: We present a consumption-based model that explains the procyclical variation of stock prices, the long-horizon predictability of excess stock returns, and the countercyclical variation of stock market volatility. Our model has an i.i.d. consumption growth driving process, and adds a slow-moving external habit to the standard power utility function. The latter feature produces cyclical variation in risk aversion, and hence in the prices of risky assets. Our model also predicts many of the difficulties that beset the standard power utility model, including Euler equation rejections, no correlation between mean consumption growth and interest rates, very high estimates of risk aversion, and pricing errors that are larger than those of the static CAPM. Our model captures much of the history of stock prices, given only consumption data. Since our model captures the equity premium, it implies that fluctuations have important welfare costs. Unlike many habit-persistence models, our model does not necessarily produce cyclical variation in the risk free interest rate, nor does it produce an extremely skewed distribution or negative realizations of the marginal rate of substitution
Investing retirement wealth : a life-cycle model by John Y Campbell( Book )
17 editions published between 1999 and 2001 in English and held by 91 libraries worldwide
Abstract: If household portfolios are constrained by borrowing and short-sales restrictions asset markets, then alternative retirement savings systems may affect household welfare by relaxing these constraints. This paper uses a calibrated partial-equilibrium model of optimal life-cycle portfolio choice to explore the empirical relevance of these issues. In a benchmark case, we find ex-ante welfare gains equivalent to a 3.7% increase in consumption from the investment of half of retirement wealth in the equity market. The main channel through which these gains are realized is that the higher average return on equities permits a lower Social Security tax rate on younger households, which helps households smooth their consumption over the life cycle. There is a smaller welfare gain of 0.5% of consumption when Social Security tax rates are held constant. We also find that realistic heterogeneity of risk aversion and labor income risk can strongly affect optimal portfolio choice over the life cycle, which provides one argument for a privatized Social Security system with an element of personal portfolio choice
Some lessons from the yield curve by John Y Campbell( Book )
15 editions published in 1995 in English and held by 90 libraries worldwide
Abstract: This paper reviews the literature on the relation between short- and long-term interest rates. It summarizes the mixed evidence on the expectations hypothesis of the term structure: when long rates are high relative to short rates, short rates tend to rise as implied by the expectations hypothesis, but long rates tend to fall which is contrary to the expectations hypothesis. The paper discusses the response of the U.S. bond market to shifts in monetary policy in the spring of 1994, and reviews the debate over the optimal maturity structure of the U.S. government debt
Inflation, real interest rates, and the bond market : a study of UK nominal and index-linked government bond prices by David G Barr( Book )
18 editions published between 1995 and 1996 in English and held by 90 libraries worldwide
Abstract: This paper estimates expected future real interest rates and inflation rates from observed prices of UK government nominal and index-linked bonds. The estimation method takes account of imperfections in the indexation of UK index-linked bonds. It assumes that expected log returns on all bonds are equal, and that expected real interest rates and inflation follow simple time-series processes whose parameters can be estimated from the cross-section of bond prices. The extracted inflation expectations forecast actual future inflation more accurately than nominal yields do. The estimated real interest rate is highly variable at short horizons, but comparatively stable at long horizons. Changes in real rates and expected inflation are strongly negatively correlated at short horizons, but not at long horizons
A scorecard for indexed government debt by John Y Campbell( Book )
15 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 89 libraries worldwide
Abstract: Within the last five years, Canada, Sweden and New Zealand have joined the ranks of the United Kingdom and other countries in issuing government bonds that are indexed to inflation. Some observers of the experience in these countries have argued that the United States should follow suit. This paper provides an overview of the issues surrounding debt indexation, and it tries to answer three empirical questions about indexed debt. First, how different would the returns on indexed bonds be from the returns on existing US debt instruments? Second, how would indexed bonds affect the government's average financing costs? Third, how might the Federal Reserve be able to use the information contained in the prices of indexed bonds to help formulate monetary policy? The paper concludes with a more speculative discussion of the possible consequences of increased use of indexed debt contracts by the private sector
Strategic asset allocation in a continuous-time var model by John Y Campbell( Book )
21 editions published between 2002 and 2003 in English and held by 88 libraries worldwide
Abstract: This note derives an approximate solution to a continuous-time intertemporal portfolio and consumption choice problem. The problem is the continuous-time equivalent of the discrete-time problem studied by Campbell and Viceira (1999), in which the expected excess return on a risky asset follows an AR(1)process, while the riskless interest rate is constant. The note also shows how to obtain continuous-time parameters that are consistent with discrete-time econometric estimates. The continuous-time solution is numerically close to that of Campbell and Viceira and has the property that conservative long-term investors have a large positive intertemporal hedging demand for stocks
Consumption and portfolio decisions when expected returns are time varying by John Y Campbell( Book )
16 editions published between 1996 and 1998 in English and held by 85 libraries worldwide
Abstract: This paper proposes and implements a new approach to a classic unsolved problem in financial economics: the optimal consumption and portfolio choice problem of a long-lived investor facing time-varying investment opportunities. The investor is assumed to be infinitely-lived, to have recursive Epstein-Zin-Weil utility, and to choose in discrete time between a riskless asset with a constant return, and a risky asset with constant return variance whose expected log return follows and AR(1) process. The paper approximates the choice problem by log-linearizing the budget constraint and Euler equations, and derives an analytical solution to the approximate problem. When the model is calibrated to US stock market data it implies that intertemporal hedging motives greatly increase, and may even double, the average demand for stocks by investors whose risk-aversion coefficients exceed one
Asset pricing at the millennium by John Y Campbell( Book )
15 editions published in 2000 in English and held by 85 libraries worldwide
Abstract: This paper surveys the field of asset pricing. The emphasis is on the interplay between theory and empirical work, and on the tradeoff between risk and return. Modern research seeks to understand the behavior of the stochastic discount factor (SDF) that prices all assets in the economy. The behavior of the term structure of real interest rates restricts the conditional mean of the SDF, while patterns of risk premia restrict its conditional volatility and factor structure. Stylized facts about interest rates, aggregate stock prices, and cross-sectional patterns in stock returns have stimulated new research on optimal portfolio choice, intertemporal equilibrium models, and behavioral finance
Consumption and the stock market : interpreting international experience by John Y Campbell( Book )
12 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 82 libraries worldwide
Abstract: This paper reviews the behavior of stock prices in relation to consumption. The paper lists some important stylized facts that characterize US data, and relates them to recent developments in equilibrium asset pricing theory. Data from other countries are examined to see which features of the US experience apply more generally. The paper argues that to make sense of stock market behavior one needs a model in which investors' risk aversion is both high and varying, such as the external habit-formation model of Campbell and Cochrane (1995)
Have individual stocks become more volatile? : an empirical exploration of idiosyncratic risk by John Y Campbell( Book )
11 editions published in 2000 in English and held by 82 libraries worldwide
Abstract: This paper uses a disaggregated approach to study the volatility of common stocks at the market, industry, and firm levels. Over the period 1962-97 there has been a noticeable increase in firm-level volatility relative to market volatility. Accordingly correlations among individual stocks and the explanatory power of the market model for a typical stock have declined, while the number of stocks needed to achieve a given level of diversification has increased. All the volatility measures move together countercyclically and help to predict GDP growth. Market volatility tends to lead the other volatility series. Factors that may be responsible for these findings are suggested
 
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Alternative Names
Campbell, J. 1958-
Campbell, J. Y. 1958-
Campbell, John Y. 1958-
Campbell, John Y. (Young), 1958-
Campbell, John Young 1958-
Young Campbell, John 1958-
キャンベル, ジョン・Y
Languages
English (322)
Spanish (1)
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