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Thomas, Duncan

Overview
Works: 16 works in 116 publications in 2 languages and 1,290 library holdings
Genres: Cross-cultural studies 
Classifications: HQ766.5.Z55, 363.96096891
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about Duncan Thomas
Publications by Duncan Thomas
Most widely held works by Duncan Thomas
Contraceptive choice, fertility, and public policy in Zimbabwe by Duncan Thomas( file )
15 editions published in 1995 in English and held by 508 libraries worldwide
How fast is fertility declining in Botswana and Zimbabwe? by Duncan Thomas( Book )
6 editions published in 1994 in English and held by 109 libraries worldwide
Does Head Start help Hispanic children? by Janet M Currie( Book )
15 editions published between 1996 and 2000 in English and held by 94 libraries worldwide
Poor educational attainment is a persistent problem among Latino children, relative to non-Latinos. This paper examines the effects of participation in the Head Start program on Latinos. We find that large and significant benefits accrue to Head Start children when we compare them to siblings who did not participate in the program. On average, Head Start closes at least 1/4 of the gap in test scores between Latino children and non-Hispanic white children, and 2/3 of the gap in the probability of grade repetition. Latinos are not a homogenous group and we find that the benefits of Head Start are not evenly distributed across sub-groups. Relative to siblings who attend no preschool from Head Start are greatest among children of Mexican-origin and children of native-born mothers, especially those whose mothers have more human capital. In contrast, Latino children whose mothers are foreign-born and Puerto Rican children appear to reap little benefit from attending Head Start, relative to their siblings
Does Head Start make a difference? by Janet M Currie( Book )
12 editions published between 1993 and 1995 in English and held by 85 libraries worldwide
Although there is a broad hi-partisan support for Head Start, the evidence of positive longterm effects of the program is not overwhelming. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey's Child-Mother file, we examine the impact of the program on a range of child outcomes. We compare non-parametric estimates of program effects with estimates from parametric models that control for selection by including mother fixed effects. This comparison suggests that studies that ignore selection can be substantially misleading; it also suggests that the impact of selection differs considerably across racial and ethnic groups. After controlling for selection, we find positive and persistent effects of participation in Head Start on the test scores of white and Hispanic children. These children are also less likely to have repeated a grade. We find no effects on the test scores or schooling attainment of African-American children. White children who attend Head Start are more likely to receive a measles shot, while African-American enrollees receive measles shots at an earlier age. African-American children who attend Head Start are also taller than their siblings. In a sample of the children's mothers, we find evidence that whites who attended Head Start as children are taller and have higher AFQT scores than their siblings who did not
School quality and the longer-term effects of Head Start by Janet M Currie( Book )
11 editions published between 1997 and 1998 in English and held by 85 libraries worldwide
Recent research on Head Start, an enriched preschool program for poor children that effects on test scores fade out' more quickly for black children than for white children. This" paper uses data from the 1988 wave of the National Educational Longitudinal Survey to show that" black children who attended Head Start go on to attend schools of worse quality' than other black" children, in the sense that they attend schools in which most children have worse test scores. We" do not see any similar pattern among white children, indicating that on average children attend schools similar to those attended by other white children. Moreover stratify by school type, we find that gaps in test scores between Head Start and other children are" very similar for blacks and whites. These patterns suggest that the effects of Head Start may fade" out more rapidly among black students than among whites, at least in part because black Head Start" children are more likely to subsequently attend bad schools
Race, children's cognitive achievement and the Bell curve by Janet M Currie( Book )
9 editions published in 1995 in English and held by 83 libraries worldwide
In The Bell Curve, Herrnstein and Murray demonstrate that a mother's score on the Armed Forces Qualification Test is a powerful predictor of her child's score on a cognitive achievement test. We replicate this finding. However, even after controlling for maternal scores, there are significant gaps in the scores of black and white children which suggests that maternal scores are not all that matter. In fact, both maternal education and income are important determinants of child test scores, conditional on maternal AFQT. We argue that racial gaps in test scores matter because even within families, children with higher scores are less likely to repeat grades. However, conditional on both child test scores and maternal AFQT, maternal education and income also affect a child's probability of grade repetition. We conclude that, even if one accepts test scores as valid measures of 'nature', both nature and nurture matter. Finally, we show that the effects on child test scores of maternal test scores, education, and income differ dramatically depending on the nature of the test, the age of the child, and race. The results suggest that understanding the relationships between different aspects of maternal achievement and child outcomes may help us unravel the complex process through which poverty is transmitted across generations
Longer term effects of Head Start by Eliana Garces( Book )
13 editions published between 2000 and 2003 in English and held by 80 libraries worldwide
The National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc. (NBER) presents an abstract for the paper entitled "Longer Term Effects of Head Start," by Eliana Garces, Duncan Thomas, and Janet Currie and issued December 2000. The paper highlights findings on the effects of participation in Head Start in the United States on schooling attainment, earnings, and criminal behavior. Users may purchase the full text of the paper
Public policy and anthropometric outcomes in Côte d'Ivoire by Duncan Thomas( Book )
11 editions published between 1991 and 1997 in English and French and held by 78 libraries worldwide
The impact of public policies on three anthropometric outcomes, height and weight for height of children and body mass index of adults is examined, using survey data from the Cote d'Ivoire. Reduced availability and quality of health care services, together with increases in the relative price of foods, which accompanied economic adjustment programs in the 1980s, adversely impacted the health of Ivorians. Basic services, such as immunizations and being equipped with simple materials, such as common drugs, are associated with improved child health. Higher food prices have had a significantly detrimental impact on the health of both children and adults
Early test scores, socioeconomic status and future outcomes by Janet M Currie( Book )
8 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 78 libraries worldwide
This paper examines the long-term effects of early test scores using data from the British National Child Development Survey. We show that test scores measured as early as age 7 have significant effects on future educational and labor market outcomes. For example, men and women in the lowest quartile of the reading test score distribution have wages 20% lower at age 33 than those who scored in the highest quartile. We test several hypotheses about the interactions between socioeconomic status and high or low test scores at age 7. In terms of test scores, educational attainments, and employment at age 33, low-SES children reap both larger gains from having high age 7 test scores and smaller losses from having low age 7 test scores. The opposite is true among high-SES children who suffer larger losses from low scores and smaller gains from high scores. However we find little evidence of comparable interactive effects for wages
Medicaid and medical care for children by Janet M Currie( Book )
7 editions published in 1993 in English and held by 58 libraries worldwide
Data from the National Longitudinal Surveys are used to compare the medical care received by children covered by Medicaid with that of other similar children. The longitudinal dimension of the data is exploited as we examine differences between siblings and repeated observations on the same child. We find that Medicaid coverage is associated with a higher probability of both black and white children receiving routine checkups but with increases in the number of doctor visits for illness only among white children. This racial disparity in the number of visits may be linked to the fact that black children with Medicaid coverage are less likely to see a private physician than other children
Policy analysis for household food insecurity : case study, rural Zimbabwe by Garry Neil Christensen( Book )
3 editions published in 1993 in English and Undetermined and held by 13 libraries worldwide
Child survival, nutritional status, and household characteristics : evidence from Brazil by Duncan Thomas( Book )
2 editions published in 1987 in English and held by 10 libraries worldwide
Nature vs. nurture? : the bell curve and children's cognitive achievement by Janet M Currie( Book )
1 edition published in 1995 in English and held by 5 libraries worldwide
In the Bell Curve, Herrnstein and Murray demonstrate that a mother's score on the Armed Forces Qualification Test is a powerful predictor of her child's score on a cognitive achievement test. The authors replicate this finding. However, even after controlling for maternal scores, there are significant gaps in the scores of black and white children which suggests that maternal scores are not all that matter. In fact, both maternal education and income are important determinants of child test scores, conditional on maternal AFQT. The authors argue that racial gaps in test scores matter because even within families, children with higher scores are less likely to repeat grades. However, conditional on both child test scores and maternal AFQT, maternal education and income also affect a child's probability of grade repetition. The authors conclude that, even if one accepts test scores as valid measures of "nature", both nature and nurture matter. Finally, the authors show that the effects on child test scores of maternal test scores, education, and income differ dramatically depending on the nature of the test, the age of the child, and race. The results suggest that understanding the relationships between different aspects of maternal achievement and child outcomes may help unravel the complex process throught which poverty is transmitted across generations
The rate of fertility decline in Botswana and Zimbabwe by Duncan Thomas( Book )
1 edition published in 1994 in English and held by 2 libraries worldwide
Household responses to the financial crisis in Indonesia : longitudinal evidence on poverty, resources, and well-being by Duncan Thomas( Article )
1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 1 library worldwide
Public policy and anthropometric outcomes in Cote d'Ivoire by Duncan Thomas( file )
1 edition published in 1992 in English and held by 1 library worldwide
 
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Languages
English (112)
French (3)
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