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Du Mont Television Network

Overview
Works: 259 works in 287 publications in 1 language and 1,173 library holdings
Genres: Nonfiction television programs  Concert television programs  Cultural television programs 
Classifications: M1001, 784.2184
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about Du Mont Television Network
Publications by Du Mont Television Network
Most widely held works about Du Mont Television Network
 
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Most widely held works by Du Mont Television Network
The Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Fritz Reiner, conductor ( visu )
1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 45 libraries worldwide
Rh factor ( visu )
1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 39 libraries worldwide
In 1939 the presence of the Rh factor was discovered to be in the blood of a large majority of human beings. This explains the some of the problems in pregancy and childbirth when a father is Rh positive and the mother is Rh negative, which can cause hemolytic disease of newborns
Captain Video and his Video Rangers ( visu )
1 edition published in 2008 in English and held by 15 libraries worldwide
In the year 2254, Captain Video and his army of Video Rangers travel the galaxy protecting the weak and defenseless from cosmic villains usually led by Dr. Pauli. Also includes some of the originally broadcast commercials
You asked for it ( visu )
2 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 3 libraries worldwide
"A wonderful snapshot of what Americans were curious about in the 50s, You asked for it debuted in 1950 and continued offering its special "believe-it-or-not brand of entertainment on ABC until 1959. Each week for nearly a decade, inquiring viewers from all over the country wrote in requesting to see the strange and bizarre. The show's producers delivered it all, from the sublime to the ridiculous, the heart-lifting to the heart-stopping, and everything in between!"--Container
The peaceful atom ( visu )
3 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 3 libraries worldwide
This program is the first in a three-part series on peacetime uses of atomic energy. A brief animated film reviews such concepts as neutrons and protons in a nucleus surrounded by electrons. There are 92 kinds of naturally occurring atoms, and changes can only be made to an atom by altering its nucleus. When the nucleus is split, it gives off energy. Mr. Strauss, the chairman of the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), cites President Eisenhower's 1953 "Atoms for Peace" speech to the United Nations in which he suggests a world pool of atomic materials for peaceful uses, such as commercial electrical power. Dr. Hafstad, Director of the Reactor Development Division of AEC, discusses the costs and problems of harnessing atomic power. He points out that although our coal and oil supplies are dwindling and uranium supplies are vast, the cost of generating power from the atom is currently prohibitive. However, he predicts that, within the next five to fifteen years, as nuclear power is developed, its costs will fall
Man will conquer space ( visu )
3 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 3 libraries worldwide
In this third in a series of programs on space exploration, Dr. Wernher von Braun, rocket expert, explains and demonstrates a three-stage rocket and its role in the construction of a three-story space station, which will be a launch pad for trips to the moon. He shows viewers both a prototype space station model and moon rocket model and an animated version of the workings of the two
News from the sky ( visu )
2 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 2 libraries worldwide
Explorations of the upper atmosphere are made through telemetering or the measuring of remote objects from afar. Rockets take these measuring devices into the upper atmosphere to measure cosmic ray intensity, fuel consumption, oil pressure, air speed, altitude, and the magnitude of the earth's magnetic field. Receivers on earth will retrieve the measurements transmitted from space through a radio link. Current uses of this information aid in the development of guided missiles
The usefulness of useless knowledge ( visu )
2 editions published between 1952 and 2003 in English and held by 2 libraries worldwide
This television show examines the basic research associated with a university. When research is in its initial stages, the information generated does not appear to have any useful application. By using case studies, the show demonstrates that basic research can have profound implications. The show begins with a discussion with Dr. Abel Wolman on the definition of a university and the university's role in the search for truth. Dr. Wolman provides some examples of how seemingly insignificant research can lead to important discoveries
Johnny Jupiter ( visu )
1 edition published in 1985 in English and held by 2 libraries worldwide
Presents two segments from the television show, Johnny Jupiter, aired in 1953. In each segment, Ernest, a general-store clerk and inventor of a device through which he communicates with Jupiter, receives help from his friends on Jupiter when he gets into difficulty. With commercials
Don't drink that water ( visu )
2 editions published between 1951 and 2003 in English and held by 2 libraries worldwide
Telegrams from educators and scholars mark the third anniversary of the Johns Hopkins Science Review. Dr. Abel Wolman summarizes the history of methods of acquiring pure water and the science of sanitary engineering. Chlorine was discovered to be a reliable and practical chemical to use to kill water-borne bacteria. Dr. Wolman also shows a film of microscopic organisms and silt in water and discusses the decline of typhoid fever. Dr. Wolman and his colleagues use both animated films and models of a water filtration plant and a sewage treatment plant to explain the water purification processes
Highlights in review ( visu )
2 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 2 libraries worldwide
Host Lynn Poole reviews highlights of programs from the past year: "Freezing the Atom" (10/10/50) shows how atoms are slowed down and the development of the bolometer; "Electronics at Work in a Vacuum"(10/25/50) describes the development of the vacuum tube and the principles behind it, using puffed wheat in a jar as an example; "Your Questions About Science" (12/26/50) explains and demonstrates atomic chain reaction or nuclear fission using mouse traps and sugar cubes; "The Unbreakable Laws of the Universe" (1/2/51) explains the physical laws governing all things: inertia, action and equal reaction, conservation of motion, gravity, and atmospheric pressure; "Fight Against Polio" (1/16/51) filmed at the Children's Hospital in Baltimore, MD, shows how polio victims are being strengthened and restored to a normal life; "Don't Take Your Heart for Granted" (2/13/51) describes what the heart is, what can happen to it, and how to take care of it; "Archaeology: Key to the Past" (3/13/51) looks at the work of archaeologists and their study of the lost civilization of the Etruscans; "Cancer Will Be Conquered" (4/10/51) features Dr. Gey describing the differences between normal and cancerous cells and showing a magnified, live view of the separation of normal and abnormal human cells; "Is There Science in Art?" (2/27/51) reveals the science of cleaning varnish and dirt from old paintings at the Walters Art Gallery and the art of using x-rays and ultraviolet light to restore old paintings to their original intent. Poole also thanks the studio staff and mentions other favorite programs: "Fear" (103/50), "X-Ray, the Super Sleuth" (12/5/50), "Stream Pollution" (5/1/51), "Don't Drink That Water" (3/20/51), "Schistosomiasis" (11/21/50), and "Magnificent Microscope" (5/15/51)
Epidemic theory Ct+1=St (1-qct), what is it? ( visu )
2 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 2 libraries worldwide
Using diagrams, Dr. Lowell J. Reed first describes the history of epidemics, the origins of disease, using measles and small pox as examples, and means of transmission. He then demonstrates the epidemic theory where St is the number of people susceptible to the disease over time multipled by 1 minus qct (the probability of a person with the disease meeting a susceptible person) equals C t+1(cases over time). Also factored into this equation is the number of people who develop an immunity to the disease after recovering from it. The theory is then tested against experience. Dr. Reed sets up an experiment demonstrating the practical application of the theory using a model. He then discusses epidemic control focusing on isolation of people who already have the disease, and immuniztion of people who are susceptible to the disease
You asked for it ( visu )
1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 2 libraries worldwide
"A wonderful snapshot of what Americans were curious about in the 50s, You asked for it debuted in 1950 and continued offering its special "believe-it-or-not brand of entertainment on ABC until 1959. Each week for nearly a decade, inquiring viewers from all over the country wrote in requesting to see the strange and bizarre. The show's producers delivered it all, from the sublime to the ridiculous, the heart-lifting to the heart-stopping, and everything in between!"--Container
Man against cancer ( visu )
2 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 2 libraries worldwide
Lynn Poole offers a definition of cancer in this third program in the series. Dr. Samuel P. Asper, Jr. describes the thyroid gland and the characteristics of hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism. William S. Halsted's operation is still used for surgery on the thyroid to remove a goiter or cancer, and both the incision and the gland are shown in photos. A recovered surgery patient, operated on by H. William Scott of Vanderbilt University Medical Center, is shown on film. Radiation of the thyroid and radioactive iodine taken internally are considered treatments rather than cures. Additional films show Dr. George O. Gey's cancer cell labs at Johns Hopkins University, Dr. Frederik B. Bang using the electron microscope to detect cervical cancer, and the U.S. Public Health Service's National Cancer Institute's use of mice in cancer research and treatment. Dr. Isaac Berenblum's book, "Man Against Cancer," the basis of this series, is promoted. Mr. Poole reminds the audience once again, early detection is the key to a cure
The science of toys ( visu )
2 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 2 libraries worldwide
This is an updated production of a program originally broadcast two years earlier, entitled "Science of toys." Lynn Poole points out that over 1,400 different toys are now manufactured for learning and sportsmanship. He visits a studio toy shop with local child Joey Vitale where "shopkeeper" John Lockwood explains the science of such toys as slinky pull trains, punching bags, gear toys, a helicopter launcher, an electric airplane and steam engine, wind-up toys, and cog-driven toys. The trio also looks at how flexible plastics are now used to make some toys safer and dolls softer. They consider polarization in magnets, static electricity in balloons, ball bearings in bike wheels, and how toys were invented. Kits on the shelf include a chemistry set, a super sleuth science kit, and a weatherman set
The New York times youth forum ( visu )
2 editions published in 1956 in English and held by 2 libraries worldwide
"A weekly series of programs, founded by Dorothy Gordon, adapted for the encouragement and stimulation of youth in spontaneous discussion of national and international issues. Not an interview program, the session belongs primarily to the youth participants, which include [boys and girls] who offer their views on economic, racial and religious matters."--1956 Peabody Digest. The question for this episode is: "How should the schools teach about communism?" The guest is Dr. George N. Shuster, President of Hunter College
Beginnings of history ( visu )
2 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 2 libraries worldwide
In this unhosted program, the second part of a film by the British Information Service continues the discussion of prehistoric civilizations in the United Kingdom with the bronze age. The iron age in Britain began around 3,000 years ago when the Celts invaded the British Isles. They brought with them the first wheeled vehicles. Remains of an ancient city and a recreation of a farmstead from this are shown
The fight against polio ( visu )
2 editions published between 1951 and 2003 in English and held by 2 libraries worldwide
The program begins with a tour of the Children's Hospital School of Baltimore, Maryland. Dr. Raymond Lenhard describes the symptoms of poliomyelitis, or infantile paralysis, and treatment of the disease. In the exercise room, a physical therapist demonstrates the muscle test for fingers and shoulders and how patients progress from simple to complex exercises. Patients are shown in crutches and leg braces, in the rocking bed, and in the treatment pool doing underwater exercises. "Iron lung" respirators are demonstrated and explained. Lynn Poole interviews two patients who recovered from polio, and he alludes to research being done in polio immunization
Science coast to coast ( visu )
2 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 2 libraries worldwide
This program focuses on the scientific achievements of four U.S. universities. At Indiana University, Vaclav Hlavaty solved the differential equations of unified gravitational and electromagnetic field thus providing proof for Einstein's unified field theory. Erwin Schrodinger and Karl Schwarzschild, pioneers in this research, are also discussed. From the New York University, Dr. Serge A. Korff directed a study of the effects of cosmic radiation from a high altitude observatory built on Mt. Wrangell in Alaska. His plane pilot was Dr. Terris Moore, president of the University of Alaska. University of Pittsburgh's Dr. Buchsbaum, professor of zoology, worked with colleagues to research how cells bathed in a nutrient fluid react to drugs and disease. A film shows these cell reactions under a phase-contrast microscope. Under the direction of Henry J. Gomberg, William Kerr, assistant director of the Michigan Memorial Phoenix Project and assistant professor of electrical engineering at the University of Michigan are investigating peaceful uses of atomic energy. They have developed a beta ray microscope that uses radioactive isotopes as tracers in specimens under microscopic investigation. This allows them to see how atoms are distributed in alloys and tracing the path of carbon in plants
Industrial hygiene ( visu )
2 editions published between 1951 and 2003 in English and held by 2 libraries worldwide
Lynn Poole discusses the work of an industrial hygienist and notes that although there are many aspects of industrial hygiene, this program focuses on atmospheric contamination and its remediation. Dr. Anna M. Baetjer describes dusts (especially silica dust) and solvents (especially carbon tetrachloride) and the research being done to determine their effect on human workers. Charles E. Couchman, a Baltimore city industrial hygienist, demonstrates how carbon monoxide testing can be done with an instrument. Hopcalyte, developed at Johns Hopkins University and University of California, is used to reduce carbon monoxide levels. Allen D. Brandt, an engineer for Bethlehem Steel, shows photographs of exhaust systems at local industries and the collection and removal of particulate matter
 
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Alternative Names
DuMont Cadena de televisión comercial de los Estados Unidos entre 1946 y 1956
DuMont Television Network
デュモント (テレビ局)
杜蒙特電視網
杜蒙電視網
Languages
English (61)
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