skip to content

O'Neill, Edward T.

Overview
Works: 52 works in 75 publications in 3 languages and 914 library holdings
Genres: Conference proceedings  Library use studies 
Roles: Editor, Researcher, Research team head, Research team member
Classifications: Z695, 025.47
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about Edward T O'Neill
Publications by Edward T O'Neill
Most widely held works by Edward T O'Neill
Subject access preparing for the future by Patrice Landry( file )
7 editions published in 2011 in English and Multiple languages and held by 602 libraries worldwide
This volume contains the proceedings of a special conference held in Florence, August 2009. The theoretical and methodological aspects of rethinking semantic access to information and knowledge are explored. Innovative projects deployed to cope with the challenges of the future are presented and discussed. This book offers a unique opportunity for librarians and other information professionals to get acquainted with the state of the art in subject indexing
FAST : Faceted Application of Subject Terminology : principles and applications by Lois Mai Chan( Book )
10 editions published between 2003 and 2010 in English and Slovenian and held by 174 libraries worldwide
The Library of Congress Subject Headings schema (LCSH) is by far the most commonly used and widely accepted subject vocabulary for general application. It is the de facto universal controlled vocabulary and has been a model for developing subject heading systems by many countries. However, LCSH's complex syntax and rules for constructing headings restrict its application by requiring highly skilled personnel and limit the effectiveness of automated authority control. Recent trends, driven to a large extent by the rapid growth of the Web, are forcing changes in bibliographic control systems to make them easier to use, understand, and apply, and subject headings are no exception. The purpose of adapting LCSH with a simplified syntax to create FAST is to retain the very rich vocabulary of LCSH while making the schema easier to understand, control, apply, and use. The schema maintains upward compatibility with LCSH, and any valid set of LC subject headings can be converted to FAST headings
Research report on subject heading patterns in OCLC monographic records by Edward T O'Neill( Book )
5 editions published between 1979 and 1981 in English and held by 72 libraries worldwide
FAST (Faceted Application of Subject Terminology) a simplified LCSH-based vocabulary by Edward T O'Neill( file )
1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 3 libraries worldwide
The Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH) schema is by far the most commonly used and widely accepted subject vocabulary for general application. It is the de facto universal controlled vocabulary and has been a model for developing new subjectheading systems around the world. However, LCSH's complex syntax and rules for constructing headings restrict its application by requiring highly skilled personnel and limit the effectiveness of automated authority control. Recent trends, driven to a large extent by the rapid growth of the Web, are forcing changes in bibliographic control systems to make them easier to use, understand, and apply, and subject headings are no exception. The purpose of adapting the LCSH in a faceted schema with a simplified syntax is to retain the very rich vocabulary of LCSH while making it easier to understand, control, apply, and use. The FAST schema maintains upward compatibility with LCSH, and any valid set of LC subject headings can be converted to FAST headings. FAST consists of eight distinct facets. Authority records have been created for all established headings except for the chronological facet. The initial version of the FAST authority file will contain approximately two million authority records
Monograph circulation patterns in academic libraries by Edward T O'Neill( Book )
1 edition published in 1973 in English and held by 3 libraries worldwide
OhioLINK--OCLC collection analysis project 2011 by OhioLINK Collection Building Task Force( file )
1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 3 libraries worldwide
The goal of this study is to gain a better understanding of how the resources of the OhioLINK libraries are being used and to identify how the limited resources of OhioLINK member libraries can be utilized more effectively. To gain a better understanding of these collections and their use, circulation data for virtually all books in Ohio academic libraries was collected and analyzed. During the spring of 2007 and again in the spring of 2008, the library-systems managers at each of the OhioLINK libraries generated a file of circulation records for all their print books. These were matched against WorldCat (93% matched) and the resulting database was analyzed
Experiments with the IFLA functional requirements for bibliographic records (FRBR) by Thomas Butler Hickey( file )
1 edition published in 2002 in English and held by 3 libraries worldwide
OCLC is investigating how best to implement IFLA's Functional Requirements for Bibliographic Records (FRBR). As part of that work we have undertaken a series of experiments with algorithms to group existing bibliographic records into works and expressions. Working with both subsets of records and the whole WorldCat database, the algorithm we developed achieved reasonable success identifying all manifestations of a work
Functional requirements for subject authority data (FRSAD) a conceptual model by Marcia Lei Zeng( Book )
1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 3 libraries worldwide
The purpose of authority control is to ensure consistency in representing a value - a name of a person, a place name, or a term or code representing a subject - in the elements used as access points in information retrieval. The primary purpose of this study is to produce a framework that will provide a clearly stated and commonly shared understanding of what the subject authority data/record/file aims to provide information about, and the expectation of what such data should achieve in terms of answering user needs
The concept of a work in WorldCat an application of FRBR by Rick Bennett( file )
1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 3 libraries worldwide
This paper explores the concept of a work in WorldCat, the OCLC Online Union Catalog, using the hierarchy of bibliographic entities defined in the Functional Requirements for Bibliographic Records (FRBR) report. A methodology is described for constructing a sample of works by applying the FRBR model to randomly selected WorldCat records
Book deterioration in Ohio libraries by Edward T O'Neill( Article )
3 editions published between 1991 and 1994 in English and held by 3 libraries worldwide
How World Wide is the Web? trends in the internationalization of Web sites by Brian F Lavoie( file )
2 editions published between 1999 and 2000 in English and held by 2 libraries worldwide
The Web is often characterized as a universal information space, in the sense that the provision of and access to Web content is open to all. It is well known, however, that the majority of Web content originates from a small group of English-speaking countries, chiefly the United States. This paper examines trends in the internationalization of Web content, and in particular, whether the Web is becoming increasingly globalized as it matures, and to what segment of the world's countries and languages it currently extends. Sample data from 1998 and 1999 suggests that the Web's content is still far from a true global cross-section, but is slowly expanding both in terms of its geographical origins and the languages in which it is made available
Book deterioration and loss : magnitude and characteristics in Ohio libraries by Edward T O'Neill( Book )
2 editions published in 1995 in English and held by 2 libraries worldwide
Form subdivisions their identification and use in LCSH by Edward T O'Neill( file )
1 edition published in 2001 in English and held by 2 libraries worldwide
Form subdivisions have always been an important part of the Library of Congress Subject Headings. However, when the MARC format was developed, no separate subfield code to identify form subdivisions was defined. Form and topical subdivisions were both included within a general subdivision category. In 1995, the USMARC Advisory Group approved a proposal defining subfield $v for form subdivisions and in 1999 the Library of Congress began identifying form subdivisions with the new code. However, there are millions of older bibliographic records lacking the explicit form subdivision coding. Identifying form subdivisions retrospectively is not a simple task. An algorithmic method was developed to identify form subdivisions coded as general subdivisions. The algorithm was used to identify 2,563 unique form subdivisions or combinations of form subdivisions in OCLC's WorldCat. The algorithm proved to be highly accurate with an error rate estimated to be less than 0.1%. The observed usage of the form subdivisions was highly skewed with the 100 most used form subdivisions or combinations of subdivisions accounting for 90% of the assignments
OCLC Office of Research examines Web-accessible information to find order in chaos by Brian F Lavoie( file )
1 edition published in 1997 in English and held by 1 library worldwide
Operations research by Edward T O'Neill( Article )
1 edition published in 1984 in English and held by 1 library worldwide
Bibliographic control for the Web by Edward T O'Neill( Article )
1 edition published in 2000 in English and held by 1 library worldwide
OSU and OCLC to study book deterioration in Ohio libraries by Edward T O'Neill( Article )
1 edition published in 1991 in English and held by 1 library worldwide
Describes a research project to be undertaken by the OCLC Office of Research and the Ohio State University Libraries Preservation Office, to determine the extent and nature of book deterioration within Ohio libraries
A faceted approach to subject data in the Dublin Core metadata record by Lois Mai Chan( Article )
1 edition published in 2001 in English and held by 1 library worldwide
The enormous volume and rapid growth of resources available on the World Wide Web and the emergence of numerous metadata schemes have spurred a reexamination of the way subject data is to be provided for Web resources efficiently and effectively. For the Dublin Core metadata record, a new approach to subject vocabulary is being investigated. This new method, called FAST (FacetedApplication of Subject Terminology), is based on the existing vocabulary in Library of Congress Subject Headings (LC), but applied with a simpler syntax than that currently used by libraries according to Library of Congress application policies. In the FAST system, non-topical (i.e., geographic, chronological, and form) data are separated from topical data and placed in different elements provided in the Dublin Core metadata record
Interlibrary borrowing initiated by patrons some characteristics of books requested via OhioLINK by Chandra Prabha( file )
1 edition published in 1998 in English and held by 1 library worldwide
Among statewide consortia, OhioLINK has broken new ground in redefining how successful interlibrary loan can become, by letting patrons directly borrow books from member libraries. We know little about the characteristics of books that are shared among the member libraries of consortia. Although several articles describe the OhioLINK implementation and experience, no previous formal study has been undertaken to describe what patrons borrow. The present work attempts to fill this void by examining 40,742 book requests initiated by patrons on OhioLINK. It describes what books patrons requested in terms of publication date, country of publication, language, and subject scope. It presents the demand for interlibrary borrowing in terms of characteristics of the institutions (for instance, collection strength and student enrollment) and in terms of the patrons' academic status. One finding is that, as a group, undergraduates are a major new category of users (42%). Additionally, about half of the books requested were published in the preceding seven years. Of these requested books, 90% were published in 1960 or later. Findings, such as these, raise new questions about the number of copies of a book that libraries across the nation need to preserve for archival and potential research use
OhioLINK joint research on patron-driven resource sharing : [an abstract] by Chandra Prabha( file )
1 edition published in 1998 in English and held by 1 library worldwide
Among statewide consortia, OhioLink is seen as a clear leader in the successful implementation of a patron-driven interlibrary borrowing system. This capability, often implemented as an enhancement to the on-line catalog system, enables patrons to borrow directly from consortium members other than their home library. The availability of this feature has increased the number of books exchanged among libraries to a level not imagined before. Most research on resource sharing has focused on factors such as traffic volume, costs, and efficiency. There is a lack of research data on the characteristics of books that patrons borrow directly from non-home member libraries, even though such data could help address important aspects of resource sharing, especially pertaining to content. A current research project attempts to fill this gap by examining 40,000 sample interlibrary book-borrowing requests initiated by patrons via OhioLink. Book characteristics such as age (publication date), subject (LC and DDC classes), distribution among membership (holdings count), and availability at the home library are used to create a patron-needs profile. This information will contribute to our knowledge of patron borrowing behavior in consortial settings, and may be useful to the future implementation of patron-driven interlibrary borrowing systems
 
moreShow More Titles
fewerShow Fewer Titles
Languages
Covers
Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.