skip to content

Wang, Yan 1953-

Overview
Works: 64 works in 222 publications in 1 language and 2,229 library holdings
Roles: Editor, Author, Honoree
Classifications: HG3881.5.W57, 004.0688
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about Yan Wang
Publications by Yan Wang
Most widely held works by Yan Wang
The emerging market of China's computer industry by Jeff X Zhang( Book )
8 editions published between 1995 and 1996 in English and held by 185 libraries worldwide
Planning and finance in China's economic reforms by Thomas P Lyons( Book )
5 editions published in 1988 in English and held by 137 libraries worldwide
Government policy and productivity growth : is East Asia an exception? by Vinod Thomas( Book )
11 editions published between 1993 and 1994 in English and held by 125 libraries worldwide
Banking Sector Openness And Economic Growth by Nihal Bayraktar( file )
11 editions published between 2006 and 2012 in English and Undetermined and held by 66 libraries worldwide
Banking sector openness may directly affect growth by improving the access to financial services and indirectly by improving the efficiency of financial intermediaries, both of which reduce the cost of financing, and in turn, stimulate capital accumulation and economic growth. The objective of the paper is to empirically reinvestigate these direct and indirect links using a more advanced econometric technique (GMM dynamic panel estimators). An illustrative model is presented to link financial market development with investment. The empirical results confirm the presence of direct and indirect links, and thus provide support for countries planning to open their banking sector for international competition
Education policy reform trends in G20 members by Yan Wang( Book )
11 editions published between 2013 and 2016 in English and held by 52 libraries worldwide
"This book documents recent policy reform in G20 members' systems and showcases the global trends in education policy; serves as a valuable reference tool and also provides inspiration for undertaking education reform to advance development in related countries."--Publisher
Ownership structure, corporate governance, and corporate performance : the case of Chinese stock companies by Xiaonian Xu( Book )
10 editions published between 1997 and 1999 in English and held by 37 libraries worldwide
June 1997 Does the ownership structure of publicly listed firms in China affect their performance? Yes. Institutional shareholders seem to have a positive impact on corporate governance and performance; state ownership seems to lead to inefficiency; and an overly dispersed ownership structure can create problems in the Chinese setting. Xu and Wang investigate whether ownership structure significantly affects the performance of publicly listed firms in China and if so, in what way. With public listed stocks, one can quantify the ownership mix and concentration, which makes it possible to study this issue. The authors use the recent literature on the role of large institutional shareholders in corporate governance as a theoretical base. A typical listed stock company in China has a mixed ownership structure, with three predominant groups of shareholders- state, legal persons (institutions), and individuals- holding about 30 percent of the stock. (Employees and foreign investors together hold less than 10 percent.) Ownership is heavily concentrated: the five largest shareholders accounted for 58 percent of outstanding shares in 1995, compared with 57.8 percent in the Czech Republic, 42 percent in Germany, and 33 percent in Japan. Their empirical analysis shows that the mix and concentration of stock ownership do indeed significantly affect a company's performance: * There is a positive, significant correlation between concentration of ownership and profitability. * The effect of concentrated ownership is greater with companies dominated by institutions than with those dominated by the state. * The firms' profitability is positively correlated with the fraction of legal person (institutional) shares; it is either negatively correlated or uncorrelated with the fraction of state shares and with tradable A-shares held mostly by individuals. * Labor productivity tends to decline as the proportion of state shares increases. This paper- product of the Office of the Director, Economic Development Institute- part of a larger effort in the Bank to understand and disseminate various models of corporate governance. The study was funded by the Bank's Research Support Budget under the research project Ownership Structure, Corporate Governance, and Firm's Performance (RPO 681-08)
Foreign bank entry, performance of domestic banks, and sequence of financial liberalization by Nihal Bayraktar( file )
3 editions published between 2004 and 2013 in English and Undetermined and held by 37 libraries worldwide
"The openness or internationalization of financial services is a complex issue because it is closely related to structural reforms in the domestic financial sector with some perceived implications for macroeconomic stability. Bayraktar and Wang investigate the impact of foreign bank entry on the performance of domestic banks and how this relationship is affected by the sequence of financial liberalization. Their data set is constructed from the BankScope database, including 30 industrial and developing countries, and covering the period from 1995 to 2002. The authors apply panel data regressions by pooling all countries together, and by grouping countries according to the sequence of their financial liberalization. One observation based on descriptive analysis is that the degree of openness to foreign bank entry varies a great deal, which is not correlated with average income levels or with GDP growth. Second, the sequence of financial liberalization matters for the performance of the domestic banking sector: After controlling for macroeconomic variables and grouping countries by their sequence of liberalization, foreign bank entry has significantly improved domestic bank competitiveness in countries that liberalized their stock market first. In these countries, both profit and cost indicators are negatively related to the share of foreign banks. Countries that liberalized their capital account first seem to have benefited less from foreign bank entry compared with the other two sets of countries. This paper a product of the Poverty Reduction and Economic Management Division, World Bank Institute is part of a larger effort in the institute to develop materials for capacity building on trade in financial services"--World Bank web site
Addressing the education puzzle the distribution of education and economic reforms by Ramón López( file )
2 editions published between 1998 and 1999 in Undetermined and English and held by 36 libraries worldwide
Measuring education inequality Gini coefficients of education by Vinod Thomas( file )
2 editions published between 1999 and 2001 in Undetermined and English and held by 36 libraries worldwide
Equal access to education is a basic human right. But in many countries gaps in education between various groups are staggering. An education Gini index -- a new indicator for the distribution of human capital and welfare -- facilitates comparison of education inequality across countries and over time
Measuring economic downside risk and severity growth at risk by Yan Wang( file )
2 editions published between 1999 and 2001 in Undetermined and English and held by 36 libraries worldwide
Using growth at risk as a measure of downside growth risk, the authors find that higher perceived levels of downside growth risk seem to be negatively associated with long-term growth
China's growth and poverty reduction recent trends between 1990 and 1999 by Shaohua Chen( file )
2 editions published between 1999 and 2001 in Undetermined and English and held by 36 libraries worldwide
Ownership structure, corporate governance, and corporate performance the case of Chinese stock companies by Xiaonian Xu( file )
2 editions published between 1997 and 1999 in Undetermined and English and held by 36 libraries worldwide
Addressing the education puzzle : the distribution of education and economic reforms by Ramón López( Book )
10 editions published between 1998 and 1999 in English and held by 35 libraries worldwide
December 1998 When and how does education bring a country high payoffs? First, the distribution of education matters: In most countries, unequal distribution of education has a negative impact on per capita income. Second, the policy environment matters, too: Economic policies that suppress market forces tend to dramatically reduce the impact of human capital on development. No country has achieved sustained economic development without substantially investing in human capital. Previous studies have shown the handsome returns to various forms of basic education, research, training, learning-by-doing, and capacity-building. But education by itself does not guarantee successful development, as history has shown in the former Soviet bloc, Sri Lanka, the Philippines, and the Indian states of Kerala and West Bengal. The question is, when and how does education bring high payoffs? Although theory has suggested a strong causal link between education and growth, the empirical evidence has not been unanimous and conclusive. López, Thomas, and Wang examine two explanatory factors. First, who gets educated matters a good deal, but the distribution of education is complex and not much has been written about it. They construct an asset allocation model that elucidates the importance of the distribution of education to economic development. Second, how education affects growth is greatly affected by the economic policy environment. Policies determine what people can do with their education. Reform of trade, investment, and labor policies can increase the returns from education. Using panel data from 12 Asian and Latin American countries for 1970-94, they investigate the relationship between education, policy reform, and economic growth. Their empirical results are promising. First, the distribution of education matters. Unequal distribution of education tends to have a negative impact on per capita income in most countries. Moreover, controlling for human capital distribution and the use of appropriate functional form specifications consistent with the asset allocation model makes a difference for the effect of average schooling on per capita income. Controlling for education distribution leads to positive and significant effects of average schooling on per capita income, while failure to do so leads to insignificant, even negative effects, of average education. Second, the policy environment matters a great deal. Our results indicate that economic policies that suppress market forces tend to dramatically reduce the impact of human capital on economic growth. Investment in human capital can have little impact on growth unless people can use education in competitive and open markets. The larger and more competitive these markets are, the greater are the prospects for using education and skills. This paper - a joint product of the Office of the Director and the Macroeconomic Management and Policy Division, Economic Development Institute - is part of a larger effort in the institute to develop a core course on development. The study was funded by the Bank's Research Support Budget under research project When Learning Makes Reform More Productive (RPO 682-02). The authors may be contacted at vthomas@worldbank.org or ywang2@worldbank.org
Sources of China's economic growth, 1952-1999 incorporating human capital accumulation by Yan Wang( file )
1 edition published in 2001 in English and held by 33 libraries worldwide
China's growth and poverty reduction : trends between 1990 and 1999 by Shaohua Chen( Book )
11 editions published between 1999 and 2001 in English and held by 31 libraries worldwide
July 2001 During the 1990s, China's poverty declined significantly across a wide range of poverty lines. China's poor have benefited much less from economic growth than the rich. Education is positively and significantly related to growth and poverty reduction--but the regional disparities of education are widening. Education must be more equitably distributed if China is to attack poverty and inequality. Chen and Wang investigate recent trends in poverty and inequality in China, decomposing data on poverty reduction to see who has benefited most from China's economic growth. They find that, by several measures, poverty declined significantly in the 1990s, across a wide range of poverty lines, except that a slight slowdown in China's export and economic growth in 1997-99 might have hurt the poor. There was a slight increase in the poverty headcount between 1997 and 1999, using lower poverty lines, and a worsening of the poverty gap index. Average per capita consumption declined for farmers, especially those living in poor regions such as Gans, Heilongjiang, Shanxi, and Xinjiang. It is unclear whether this decline was attributable to Asia's economic crisis. Economic growth contributed significantly to poverty reduction, but rising inequality worsened both rural and urban income distributions--except during the Asian crisis when the distribution remained relatively stable. The poor benefited far less than the rich from economic growth. Income growth reached or exceeded the average growth rate only for the richest 20 percent of the population. Chen and Wang then examine the relationship between human capital, growth, and poverty. They find that the accumulation of human capital had slowed and that there is a huge regional disparity in human capital stock. And the distribution of education is becoming increasingly skewed. China must address this problem if it is to succeed in attacking poverty and inequality. This paper--a joint product of Poverty, Development Research Group, and the Economic Policy and Poverty Reduction Division, World Bank Institute--was presented at a WBI-PIDS seminar, "Strengthening Poverty Data Collection and Analysis," Manila, April 30-May 4, 2001. The authors may be contacted at schen@worldbank.org or ywang2@worldbank.org
Sources of China's economic growth, 1952-1999 : incorporating human capital accumulation by Yan Wang( Book )
7 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 30 libraries worldwide
Implicit pension debt, transition cost, options and impact of China's pension reform : a computable general equilibrium analysis by Yan Wang( Book )
8 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 30 libraries worldwide
China's population is aging rapidly: the old age dependency ratio will rise from 11 percent in 1999 to 25 percent in 2030 and 36 percent in 2050. Currently, three workers support one retiree; without reform, the system dependency ratio will climb to 69 percent in 2030 and 79 percent in 2050. The pension system has been in deficit, with an implicit pension debt in 2000 as high as 71 percent of GDP. The lack of an effective sustainable pension systemn is a serious obstacle to Chinese economic reform
Measuring economic downside risk and severity : growth at risk by Yan Wang( Book )
8 editions published between 1999 and 2001 in English and held by 28 libraries worldwide
Using growth at risk as a measure of downside growth risk, the authors find that higher perceived levels of downside growth risk seem to be negatively associated with long-term growth
The quality of growth and poverty reduction in China by Xiaolin Wang( Book )
13 editions published between 2012 and 2016 in English and held by 25 libraries worldwide
The rapid growth over the past three decades has been instrumental in lifting over 600 million people in China out of poverty, and people want to know why and how it happened. International evidence has made it clear that a global economy based on current patterns of consumption and production is simply not sustainable. Policymakers have repeatedly been advised that economic growth, poverty reduction, equity, and environment and resource sustainability must be integrated into national development strategies. What about China? The principle limitation of existing China-focused economic studies lies in its imbalances from the perspective of analysis and the impact of growth on poverty and inequality. A limited number of studies are devoted to structural transformation and China's structural imbalances, social disparities and the role of science and technology on growth and productivity. This book addresses the alarming environmental consequences of China's growth patterns within an overall quality growth framework. It contributes to the economic growth and development literature and current policy discourse on China by expanding the policy analysis to include several important new areas using the most recent data available. This includes analyzing macroeconomic factors that underlie the need for China to advance its economic transformation; examining how social inequalities, including health, education and gender, have evolved and presenting the scale of environmental problems associated with China's growth miracle. This report represents the first attempt to integrate the issue of environmental sustainability and climate change into the quality growth context, providing readers with a comprehensive account of China's success and challenges in its three decades of rapid economic growth
Foreign bank entry, performance of domestic banks, and sequence of financial liberalization by Nihal Bayraktar( Book )
6 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 24 libraries worldwide
Abstract: "The openness or internationalization of financial services is a complex issue because it is closely related to structural reforms in the domestic financial sector with some perceived implications for macroeconomic stability. Bayraktar and Wang investigate the impact of foreign bank entry on the performance of domestic banks and how this relationship is affected by the sequence of financial liberalization. Their data set is constructed from the BankScope database, including 30 industrial and developing countries, and covering the period from 1995 to 2002. The authors apply panel data regressions by pooling all countries together, and by grouping countries according to the sequence of their financial liberalization. One observation based on descriptive analysis is that the degree of openness to foreign bank entry varies a great deal, which is not correlated with average income levels or with GDP growth. Second, the sequence of financial liberalization matters for the performance of the domestic banking sector: After controlling for macroeconomic variables and grouping countries by their sequence of liberalization, foreign bank entry has significantly improved domestic bank competitiveness in countries that liberalized their stock market first. In these countries, both profit and cost indicators are negatively related to the share of foreign banks. Countries that liberalized their capital account first seem to have benefited less from foreign bank entry compared with the other two sets of countries. This paper a product of the Poverty Reduction and Economic Management Division, World Bank Institute is part of a larger effort in the institute to develop materials for capacity building on trade in financial services"--World Bank web site
 
moreShow More Titles
fewerShow Fewer Titles
Alternative Names
Wang, Yen, 1953-
Yan, Wang
Yan, Wang, 1953-
王雁
Languages
English (126)
Covers
Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.