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Woo, Wing Thye

Overview
Works: 97 works in 286 publications in 2 languages and 8,568 library holdings
Genres: Case studies  Conference papers and proceedings 
Roles: Editor, Author, Other, Honoree, Contributor
Classifications: HC427.95, 338.947
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about Wing Thye Woo
Publications by Wing Thye Woo
Most widely held works by Wing Thye Woo
Economies in transition : comparing Asia and Eastern Europe by Wing Thye Woo( Book )
18 editions published between 1997 and 1998 in English and Undetermined and held by 616 libraries worldwide
The Asian financial crisis : lessons for a resilient Asia ( Book )
8 editions published in 2000 in English and held by 542 libraries worldwide
This book analyzes the Asian financial crisis of 1997-1999. In addition to the issues of financial system restructuring, export-led recovery, crony capitalism, and competitiveness in Asian manufacturing, it examines six key Asian economies--China, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, and Thailand. The book makes clear that there is little particularly Asian about the Asian financial crisis. The generic character of the crisis became clear during 1998, when it reached Russia, South Africa, and Brazil. The spread of the crisis reflects the rapid arrival of global capitalism in a world economy not used to the integration of the advanced and developing countries
China's dilemma : economic growth, the environment and climate change by Ligang Song( Book )
14 editions published in 2008 in English and Undetermined and held by 446 libraries worldwide
China's Dilemma - Economic Growth, the Environment and Climate Change examines the challenges China will have to confront in order to maintain rapid growth while coping with the global financial turbulence, some rising socially destabilising tensions such as income inequality, an over-exploited environment and the long-term pressures of global warming. China's Dilemma discusses key questions that will have an impact on China's growth path and offers some in-depth analyses as to how China could confront these challenges. The authors address the effect of the global credit crunch and financial shocks on China's economic growth; China's contribution to greenhouse gas emissions and emissions reduction schemes; the environmental consequences of foreign direct investment in China; the relationship between air pollution and mortality; the effect of climate change on agricultural output; the coal industry's compliance with tougher regulations; and the constraints water shortages may impose on China's economy. It also emphasises the importance of managing the rising demand for energy to moderate oil price increases and placating domestic and international concerns about global warming. In the thirty years since China started on the path of reform, it has emerged as one of the largest and most dynamic economies in the world. This carries with it the responsibility to balance the requirements of key industries that are driving its development with the need to ensure that its growth is both equitable and sustainable. China's Dilemma highlights key lessons learned from the past thirty years of reform in order to pave the way for balanced and sustained growth in the future
Fiscal management and economic reform in the People's Republic of China by Christine Wong( Book )
12 editions published between 1995 and 1997 in English and held by 281 libraries worldwide
Macroeconomic policies, crises, and long-term growth in Indonesia, 1965-90 by Wing Thye Woo( Book )
15 editions published in 1994 in English and held by 233 libraries worldwide
Power and sustainability of the Chinese state by Keun Lee( Book )
10 editions published between 2008 and 2012 in English and held by 110 libraries worldwide
Since the start of the 21st century China has risen to the status of an important world power. This book examines Chinese power, focusing in particular, although not exclusively, on its economic capabilities, and considering how this is likely to develop in the future. It provides a detailed assessment of the key facets of Chinese power today, including GDP, growth, multinationals, and technological and scientific innovation. It identifies the key trends in these areas, compares China's experience with other important global powers such as the US, and considers how this is viewed by the Chinese themselves, including through the lens of their popular culture and mass media. It goes on to identify the foremost problems facing China and the Chinese state today, including fiscal management and public finance, poverty, inequality and rural development, and considers whether China is capable of overcoming these challenges and continuing its remarkable economic development. It addresses crucial questions such as the impact of globalization on Chinese power, and whether Communist Party rule is sustainable for the foreseeable future
A new economic growth engine for China : escaping the middle-income trap by not doing more of the same by Wing Thye Woo( Book )
14 editions published in 2012 in English and held by 97 libraries worldwide
From various aspects of the domestic and foreign situation, China has now reached a critical juncture in its economic development. This volume is a report by leading international economic experts on China's economic priorities in the coming years
Understanding China's economic performance by Jeffrey Sachs( Book )
25 editions published in 1997 in English and held by 94 libraries worldwide
Broadly speaking, two schools of thought have emerged to interpret China's rapid growth since 1978:the experimentalist school and the convergence school. The experimentalist school attributes China's successes to the evolutionary, experimental, and incremental nature of China's reforms. Specifically, the resulting non-capitalist institutions are said to be successful in (a) agri- culture where land is not owned by the farmers; (b) township and village en- terprises (TVEs) which are owned collectively by rural communities; and (c) state owned enterprises (SOEs) where increased competition and increased wage incentive, not privatization, have been emphasized. The convergence school holds that China's successes are the result of its institutions being allowed to converge with those of non-socialist market economies, and that China's economic structure at the start of reforms is a major reason for the fast growth. China had a high population density heavily concentrated in low-wage agriculture which was favorable for labor-intensive export-led growth in other parts of East Asia. The convergence school also holds that China's gradualism results mainly from a lack of consensus over the proper course, with power divided between market reformers and old-style socialists; and that the 'inno- ative economic circumstances. Perhaps the best test of the two approaches is whether China's policy choices are in fact leading to institutions harmonized with normal market economies or to more distinctive innovations. The recent policy trend has been towards institutional harmonization rather than institutional innovation, suggesting that the government accepts that the ingredients for a dynamic market economy are already well-known
Financial systems at the crossroads : lessons for China by Wing Thye Woo( Book )
9 editions published in 2014 in English and Undetermined and held by 54 libraries worldwide
Financial Systems at the Crossroads: Lessons for China's Choice is written by leading financial experts to study the causes of financial disasters internationally. The research team is drawn from the global research networks of three leading universities: the Antai College of Economics and Management at Shanghai Jiao Tong University, the School of Economics at Fudan University, and the Earth Institute at Columbia University. This review volume identifies the regulatory framework to guide the emergence of efficient financial institutions that are prudent; and to specify the required institutional mechanisms to prevent and resolve systemic collapse. It examines the specific circumstances of China to come up with a comprehensive agenda to reform China's financial sector. It provides in-depth analysis of China's financial industry to show its future evolution and offers lessons for developing a financial system that is efficient, innovative and resilient
China's new place in a world in crisis : economic geopolitical and environmental dimensions by Wing Thye Woo( file )
8 editions published in 2009 in English and Undetermined and held by 52 libraries worldwide
The world and China's place in it have been transformed over the past year. The pressures for change have come from the most severe global financial crisis ever. The crisis has accelerated China & rsquo;s emergence as a great power. But China and its global partners have yet to think or work through the consequences of its new position for the governance of world affairs. China & rsquo;s New Place in a World in Crisis discusses and provides in-depth analysis of the following questions. How have China's growth prospects been affected by the global crisis? How will the crisis and China & rsquo;s response to it impact China's major domestic issues, such as industrialisation, urbanisation and the reform of the state-owned sector of the economy? How will the crisis and the international community & rsquo;s response to it affect the rapidly emerging new international order? What will be China's, and other major developing countries, new role? Can China and the world find a way of breaking the nexus between economic growth and environmental sustainability especially on the issue of climate change?
Geography, economic policy, and regional development in China by Sylvie Démurger( Book )
5 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 48 libraries worldwide
Many studies of regional disparity in China have focused on the preferential policies received by the coastal provinces. We decomposed the location dummies in provincial growth regressions to obtain estimates of the effects of geography and policy on provincial growth rates in 1996-99. Their respective contributions in percentage points were 2.5 and 3.5 for the province-level metropolises, 0.6 and 2.3 for the northeastern provinces, 2.8 and 2.8 for the coastal provinces, 2.0 and 1.6 for the central provinces, 0 and 1.6 for the northwestern provinces, and 0.1 and 1.8 for the southwestern provinces. Because the so-called preferential policies are largely deregulation policies that have allowed coastal Chinese provinces to integrate into the international economy, it is far superior to reduce regional disparity by extending these deregulation policies to the interior provinces than by re-regulating the coastal provinces. Two additional inhibitions to income convergence are the household registration system, which makes the movement of the rural poor to prosperous areas illegal, and the monopoly state bank system that, because of its bureaucratic nature, disburses most of its funds to its large traditional customers, few of whom are located in the western provinces. Improving infrastructure to overcome geographic barriers is fundamental to increasing western growth, but increasing human capital formation (education and medical care) is also crucial because only it can come up with new better ideas to solve centuries-old problems like unbalanced growth
The Economics and Politics of Transition to an Open Market Economy China by Wing Thye Woo( Book )
12 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 41 libraries worldwide
China is considered to be a particularly successful example of a gradual approach to transition from a command economy to a market economy. This paper reviews the initial conditions, the calendar of reform steps, and the political preconditions for liberalisation. It argues that gradualism was rather the result of a political balancing act between orthodox and reform-minded elements in the Chinese Communist Party than a deliberate approach towards facilitating transition. Economic liberalisation was considered as an instrument for safeguarding the power of the Party, but opinions differed on the degree of liberalisation needed to achieve this goal. Thus, the pace and the direction of the reform process were very much a function of the composition of the leadership of the Party at any given time
Lessons for reform ( Book )
6 editions published between 1994 and 1995 in English and Ukrainian and held by 35 libraries worldwide
Decentralized socialism and macroeconomic stability : lessons from China by Gang Fan( Book )
9 editions published between 1992 and 1993 in English and held by 24 libraries worldwide
Moving forward on the establishment of an effective surveillance system and an improved financial architecture for East Asia by Yun-jong Wang( Book )
3 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 22 libraries worldwide
The Economics and Politics of Transition to an Open Market Economy : China by Wing Thye Woo( Article )
1 edition published in 1999 in English and held by 14 libraries worldwide
China is considered to be a particularly successful example of a gradual approach to transition from a command economy to a market economy. This paper reviews the initial conditions, the calendar of reform steps, and the political preconditions for liberalisation. It argues that gradualism was rather the result of a political balancing act between orthodox and reform-minded elements in the Chinese Communist Party than a deliberate approach towards facilitating transition. Economic liberalisation was considered as an instrument for safeguarding the power of the Party, but opinions differed on the degree of liberalisation needed to achieve this goal. Thus, the pace and the direction of the reform process were very much a function of the composition of the leadership of the Party at any given time
Exchange rates and the prices of nonfood, nonfuel products by Wing Thye Woo( Book )
3 editions published in 1984 in English and held by 10 libraries worldwide
The impact of U.S. policy mix on the ASEAN economies by Wing Thye Woo( Book )
4 editions published in 1985 in English and held by 9 libraries worldwide
The consequences of China's WTO accession on its neighbours by Warwick J McKibbin( Book )
3 editions published between 2003 and 2004 in English and held by 6 libraries worldwide
Ranking the liveability of the world's major cities : the Global Liveable Cities Index (GlCI) by Khee Giap Tan( Book )
2 editions published in 2012 in Undetermined and English and held by 1 library worldwide
This unique volume aims to provide a first comprehensive assessment on attributes, conditions and characters which constitute a liveable city. The book posits that the degree of liveability depends on five themes: satisfaction with the freedom from want
 
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Alternative Names
Wing Thye Woo.
Wing, Thye Woo 1954-
Woo, Wing T.
Woo, Wing T. 1954-
Woo Wing Thye
Woo, Wing-thye 1954-
Woo Wing Thye American economist
Languages
English (172)
Ukrainian (2)
Covers
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