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Weder, Beatrice

Overview
Works: 89 works in 373 publications in 2 languages and 5,837 library holdings
Genres: Case studies 
Roles: Author, Editor, Contributor, Honoree
Classifications: JQ1499.A61, 338.9
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about Beatrice Weder
Publications by Beatrice Weder
Most widely held works by Beatrice Weder
Model, myth, or miracle? : reassessing the role of governments in the East Asian experience by Beatrice Weder( Book )
17 editions published between 1998 and 2004 in English and Undetermined and held by 297 libraries worldwide
"Before the financial crisis of the late 1990s, the East Asian experience was hailed as a miracle and a model of successful development. A broad consensus had been reached on the role of governments in engineering this economic success, and rapid growth was generally attributed to sound policies that were underpinned by a solid institutional framework." "In the aftermath of the financial crisis, however, the "miracle" has been dismissed as a myth and a bad example that other countries should avoid. Critics allege that governments not only made serious policy mistakes, but also that the institutional framework was not so beneficial after all. The term "crony capitalism" is frequently used to summarize this notion." "This book investigates the role that institutional conditions played in the miracle, and whether they had a part in causing the crisis. The focus is on such factors as the close ties between the public and private sectors, the incentives structures within the public sector, and corruption."--Jacket
Political credibility and economic development by Silvio Borner( Book )
16 editions published between 1995 and 1999 in English and held by 285 libraries worldwide
How businesses see government : responses from private sector surveys in 69 countries by Aymo Brunetti( Book )
22 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 201 libraries worldwide
"This paper presents the results of a survey of almost 4,000 entrepreneurs in 69 countries who were asked to judge what constituted a major obstacle for business operations. Among the numerous findings in the report, corruption, crime and theft, and tax regulations were found to be important obstacles to doing business. OECD countries, six transition countries, and twelve developing countries were represented in the survey."
Firm size and the business environment : worldwide survey results by Mirjam Schiffer( Book )
17 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 153 libraries worldwide
Annotation
Investment and institutional uncertainty : a comparative study of different uncertainty measures by Aymo Brunetti( Book )
19 editions published in 1997 in English and held by 141 libraries worldwide
Chancen des Wachstums : globale Perspektiven für den Wohlstand von morgen by Beatrice Weder( Book )
8 editions published between 2007 and 2008 in German and Undetermined and held by 82 libraries worldwide
Review quote: 2008-01-04, Neue Zürcher Zeitung, "Das Buch präsentiert die neuesten Forschungsergebnisse, Theorien und Themen rund um das Wachstum und bleibt stets leicht verständlich"
Do corrupt governments receive less foreign aid? by Alberto Alesina( Book )
15 editions published between 1999 and 2000 in English and Undetermined and held by 82 libraries worldwide
Critics of foreign aid programs argue that these funds often support corrupt governments and inefficient bureaucracies. Supporters argue that foreign aid can be used to reward good governments. This paper documents that there is no evidence that less corrupt governments receive more foreign aid. On the contrary, according to some measures of corruption, more corrupt governments receive more aid. Also, we could not find any evidence that an increase in foreign aid reduces corruption. In summary, the answer to the question posed in the title is 'no.'
Institutional obstacles to Latin American growth by Silvio Borner( Book )
6 editions published in 1992 in English and held by 79 libraries worldwide
Institutions in transition : reliability of rules and economic performance in former socialist countries by Aymo Brunetti( Book )
12 editions published between 1997 and 1999 in English and held by 75 libraries worldwide
August 1997 The predictability of a transition economy's institutional framework may well influence the amount of foreign direct investment and economic growth the economy can expect. Building reliable institutions that support a market system is widely believed to be critical to a successful economic transition. Brunetti, Kisunko, and Weder present indicators on the predictability of the institutional framework across twenty transition economies--indicators of the predictability of rules, political stability, the security of property rights, the reliability of the judiciary, and the lack of corruption. They then investigate whether these indicators can explain differences in economic performance. The results suggest that the predictability of the institutional framework may indeed explain a large part of differences in foreign direct investment and in economic growth among transition economies. Political stability and secure property rights are particularly important to entrepreneurial confidence in the economy. This paper--a product of the Office of the Chief Economist and Senior Vice President, Development Economics--was produced as a background paper for World Development Report 1997: The Role of the State in a Changing World. The study was funded in part by the Research Support Budget under the research projects Cross-Country Indicators of Institutional Uncertainty (RPO 680-51) and Indicators of Government Quality as Perceived by the Private Sector (RPO 681-52)
Institutional obstacles to doing business region-by-region results from a worldwide survey of the private sector by Aymo Brunetti( file )
16 editions published between 1997 and 1999 in English and Undetermined and held by 69 libraries worldwide
April 1997 More than 3,600 entrepreneurs worldwide respond to a survey about problems with uncertainty in dealings with the state. Case studies and anecdotal evidence have suggested that uncertainty about policies, laws, and regulations has hampered development of the private sector in many developing countries. Brunetti, Kisunko, and Weder present results from a new cross-country survey that provides comparable data on local investors' problem in dealing with the state. The survey was conducted in 69 countries and covers more than 3,600 entrepreneurs. The questionnaire asked 25 questions about investors' perceptions about such issues as the predictability of laws and policies, the reliability of the judiciary, corruption in bureaucracies, and security of property rights. It also asked about general obstacles to doing business and the quality of state-delivered services. Brunetti, Kisunko, and Weder discuss their methodology and present many findings. Among them: * In less developed countries the majority of entrepreneurs constantly fear policy surprises and unexpected changes in rules that can seriously affect their business. Entrepreneurs in Asia have the most trust in government announcements of policy changes and changes in rules; entrepreneurs in the Commonwealth of Independent States are the most cynical about new announcements; and half of businessmen surveyed in Latin America and Central and Eastern Europe do not believe government announcements. * Entrepreneurs worldwide feel that the cost of doing business is substantially increased by theft and crime and in many developing countries the business community feels that authorities do not adequately guarantee their personal safety and do not reliably enforce their property rights. * Unreliable judiciaries are perceived as major problems in many developing countries. This applies in particular to the Commonwealth of Independent States and to Latin American countries. * Entrepreneurs in industrial countries perceived the greatest obstacles to doing business to be tax regulations and high taxes, labor regulations, safety or environmental regulations, financing, regulations for starting new businesses and operations, and general uncertainty about the costs of regulation. * Entrepreneurs in South Asia and Southeast Asia ranked the top obstacles to doing business as high taxes and tax regulations, inadequate infrastructure, inflation, labor regulations, and regulations for starting new businesses and operations. * In the Middle East and North Africa, entrepreneurs considered lack of infrastructure the chief obstacle to doing business, followed by corruption, high taxes and tax regulations, and financing. * In Central and Eastern Europe, high taxes and tax regulations were the only regulation-related obstacle ranked high, followed by financing, corruption, and inflation. * The worst obstacles in Latin America were considered to be corruption and inadequate infrastructure, followed by crime and theft, problems with finance, and high taxes and tax regulation. * In Sub-Saharan Africa the biggest problems were corruption, tax regulations and high taxes, inadequate infrastructure, inflation, crime and theft, and financing. This paper - a product of the Office of the Chief Economist and Senior Vice President, Development Economics- was produced as a background paper for World Development Report 1997 on the role of the state in a changing world. The study was funded in part by the Research Support Budget under the research projects Cross-Country Indicators of Institutional Uncertainty (RPO 680-51), and Indicators of Government Quality as Perceived by the Private Sector (RPO 681-52)
Credibility of rules and economic growth evidence from a worldwide survey of the private sector by Aymo Brunetti( file )
11 editions published in 1997 in English and held by 65 libraries worldwide
April 1997 An indicator of the credibility of rules is constructed from broad cross-country survey data and it is shown that low credibility is associated with lower rates of growth and investment. Economic theory and case study evidence have long suggested that institutional factors, such as well-defined property and contract rights, may be crucial in explaining differences in economic performance across countries. Much of the recent discussion about governance has, for example, focused on the role of corruption and its consequences for investment and growth. By comparison, the empirical literature relating institutional factors with growth has been relatively scarce and has mainly concentrated on crude proxies such as political instability and macroeconomic volatility. The problem of most of these variables in that they inadequately capture the uncertainties that are relevant for entrepreneurs. Brunetti, Kisunko, and Weder propose new measures of institutional uncertainty based on the subjective evaluations of entrepreneurs. They surveyed the private sector in a broad cross-section of countries. The survey was designed to capture institutional factors such as the predictability of rules, entrepreneurs' fears of policy surprises and reversals, their perception of safety and security of property, the reliability of the judiciary, and their problems with bureaucratic corruption. The authors construct and test a summary indicator of the credibility of rules, as well as its components in standard cross-country growth and investment regressions. The main findings: The overall indicator of credibility is significantly related with higher rates of investment and growth. The credibility indicator calculated for the subsample of small local companies is even more closely related to the growth performance. The subindicators security of persons and property and predictability of rule-making are most closely associated with growth. The indicators of corruption, perceived political instability, and predictability of judiciary enforcement are most closely associated with investment. Preliminary results for an extended sample - including transition economies - indicate that institutional factors may also help to explain differences in economic performance in these countries. This paper - a product of the Office of the Chief Economist and Senior Vice President, Development Economics- was produced as a background paper for World Development Report 1997 on the role of the state in a changing world. The study was funded in part by the Research Support Budget under the research projects Cross-Country Indicators of Institutional Uncertainty (RPO 680-51), and Indicators of Government Quality as Perceived by the Private Sector (RPO 681-52)
Wirtschaft zwischen Anarchie und Rechtstaat by Beatrice Weder( Book )
3 editions published in 1993 in German and held by 39 libraries worldwide
How private creditors fared in emerging debt markets, 1970-2000 by Christoph Klingen( Book )
12 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 34 libraries worldwide
We estimate ex post returns to emerging market debt by combining secondary-market prices with observed flows based on World Bank data. From 1970-2000, returns averaged 9 percent per annum, about the same as returns on a ten-year U.S. treasury bond. This reflects the combined effect of the 1980s debt crisis and much higher returns during 1989-2000. Annual returns since 1986 have been less volatile than emerging market equity returns but more volatile than returns on U.S. corporate or high-yield bonds. However, unlike returns on these bonds, emerging market debt returns do not seem significantly correlated with U.S. or world stock markets
Corruption and the rate of temptation : Do low wages in the civil service cause corruption? by Caroline van Rijckeghem( Book )
8 editions published in 1997 in English and held by 32 libraries worldwide
"The [Singapore] government believed that an efficient bureaucratic system is one in which the officers are well-paid so the temptation to resort to bribes would be reduced
Economic transformation and income distribution : some evidence from the Baltic countries by Peter Cornelius( Book )
7 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 27 libraries worldwide
Annotation
Sources of contagion : finance or trade? by Caroline van Rijckeghem( Book )
6 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 21 libraries worldwide
Annotation
Institutional reform in transition economies : how far have they come? by Beatrice Weder( Book )
5 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 21 libraries worldwide
This paper examines how institutional conditions in transition economies compare with those in the rest of the world using various indicators of governance. The focus is on the countries in Central and Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union but, when possible, transition countries, in Asia and Africa are also considered. The main findings are that transition economies, as a group, are no longer distinguishable from other economies, but at the same time, there are large differences in institutional performance within the group of transition economies. A formal cluster analysis is conducted in order to map transition economies into homogeneus groupings of countries. The results of this analysis highlight that transition economies are found at all clusters (from best to worst institutional performers) and also that a group of five countries, all of which are EU accession countries, appear to have 'graduated': when taking into account their level of income, thwir institutional conditions are no longer distinguishable from those in the most advanced industrialized countries
Spillovers through banking centers : a panel data analysis by Caroline van Rijckeghem( Book )
6 editions published in 2000 in English and held by 20 libraries worldwide
International banks are a major source of financing for emerging economies and also one of the most volatile ones. In Asia, for example, banks were the single largest group of creditors before the crisis and bank lending was the most variable component of capital flows during the crisis. In 1996, net flows from banks into 29 emerging markets accounted for USD120 billion, or about a third of total private inflows. In 1997 banks had reduced their share to about 9 percent of private inflows and by 1998 net inflows had turned into net outflows of about USD30 billion. 2 Understanding banks' responses to crisis appears to be an important link in explaining the international transmission of currency crisis. 3 In the wake of the recent currency crises, observers have pointed to a number of reasons why banking centers may add to financial contagion which can be classified into two types: the first has been referred to as a "common lender" effect and the second as a "wake up call" effect
Quantifying structural subsidy values for systemically important financial institutions by Kenichi Ueda( Book )
4 editions published in 2012 in English and Undetermined and held by 2 libraries worldwide
Claimants to SIFIs receive transfers when governments are forced into bailouts. Ex ante, the bailout expectation lowers daily funding costs. This funding cost differential reflects both the structural level of the government support and the time-varying market valuation for such a support. With large worldwide sample of banks, we estimate the structural subsidy values by exploiting expectations of state support embedded in credit ratings and by using long-run average value of rating bonus. It was already sizable, 60 basis points, as of the end-2007, before the crisis. It increased to 80 basis points by the end-2009
 
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Alternative Names
Beatrice Weder di Mauro econome uit Zwitserland
Beatrice Weder di Mauro schweizerisch-italienische Wirtschaftswissenschaftlerin
Beatrice Weder di Mauro Swiss economist
Di Mauro, Beatrice Weder
Di Mauro Beatrice Weder 1965-....
DiMauro, Beatrice Weder 1965-
Mauro, Beatrice Weder di 1965-
Weder, B. 1965-
Weder, Beatrice S.
Weder, Beatrice S. 1965-
Weder di Mauro, Beatrice
Weder di Mauro Beatrice 1965-....
WederDiMauro, Beatrice 1965-
ベアトリーチェ・ウェダー・ディ・マウロ
Languages
English (195)
German (10)
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