skip to content

Hentschel, Jesko 1962-

Overview
Works: 63 works in 214 publications in 1 language and 2,616 library holdings
Genres: Methods (Music) 
Roles: Author
Classifications: HG3881.5.W57, 382.091724
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about Jesko Hentschel
Publications by Jesko Hentschel
Most widely held works by Jesko Hentschel
Imports and growth in highly indebted countries : an empirical study by Jesko Hentschel( Book )
13 editions published between 1992 and 2012 in English and held by 172 libraries worldwide
A real imports of capital and intermediate goods declined sharply for highlyindebted countries in the 1980s, these economies were faced with the need tosubstitute previously imported factors of production with domestic capital and labor. The study empirically analyzes the degree of import dependence of twelve developing countries. Estimates of the short-run elasticity of substitution characterize both imported capital and intermediate goods to behave like complements in the production process in the developing countries. Long-run substitution elasticites differ considerably among the group of economies, especially for imported machinery and equipment. The results indicate that inward-oriented strategies have not achieved the aim of reducing the import dependence of the developing economies. In order to visualize theimplications of the differing degree of import dependence, a partial equilibrium econometric model is used to analyze the reaction of the trade account on external shocks and domestic policies in Columbia and Ecuador. Simulations show that the dependence on imported production means can transform an "adjustment with growth" of the external account intoan "adjustment or growth" controversy
Constructing an indicator of consumption for the analysis of poverty : principles and illustrations with reference to Ecuador by Jesko Hentschel( Book )
18 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 129 libraries worldwide
The city poverty assessment : a primer by Jesko Hentschel( Book )
18 editions published between 2000 and 2001 in English and held by 120 libraries worldwide
Annotation
Life chances in Turkey : expanding opportunities for the next generation by Jesko Hentschel( Book )
12 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 82 libraries worldwide
Children in Turkey have vastly different odds of success. Their paths are affected by factors over which they have no control, such as how wealthy or educated their parents--and even grandparents--are. By investing in its children and youth, Turkey can create a virtuous cycle whereby these children and youth contribute more to their country's economic growth and social development, helping to realize its ambitious goals. Written to contribute to the public policy debate, Life Chances in Turkey: Expanding Opportunities for the Next Generation notes that girls are at a particular disadvantage. Compared to a boy born to well-off, highly educated parents in one of the urban centers of the country's west, a girl born in a remote eastern village to poor parents with primary school degrees is four times as likely to suffer from low birth weight, one-third as likely to be immunized, and ten times as likely to have her growth stunted as a result of malnutrition. She has a one-in-five chance of completing high school, whereas the boy will likely attend college. With child development trajectories thus diverging early in life, pro-equity policies should focus on reaching the most disadvantaged children early in their life, ideally before birth. Turkey, with the active involvement of nongovernmental organizations, has piloted a number of highly successful programs to reach and support disadvantaged children. But it can do more: only 6 percent of the country's total public social spending reaches children below the age of six. About four times more is spent on a middle-aged or elderly person than on a child. Life Chances finds that if today's under-40 Turkish adults had all benefited from one year of preschool education when they were six years old, family incomes could be up to 8 percent higher, one-tenth of poor families would not live in poverty today, and about 9 percent more women--in other words,
Rural poverty in Ecuador a qualitative assessment by Jesko Hentschel( file )
15 editions published between 1996 and 1999 in English and Undetermined and held by 74 libraries worldwide
February 1996 This report aims to assess what poverty means to marginalized rural families, what kind of survival strategies families use in times of hardship, and what these families believe is needed to alleviate their poverty. The rural families express very practical solutions to overcoming poverty, largely linked to increasing the productivity of human resources and land through training and small-scale infrastructure investments. A complement to recent in-depth quantitative analyses of rural poverty in Ecuador, this is a report on the results of the Rural Qualitative Assessment of living conditions in rural communities in all three of Ecuador's diverse regions. Using a variety of qualitative techniques, the research aimed to assess what poverty means to marginalized rural families, what kind of survival strategies families use in times of hardship, and what these families believe is needed to alleviate poverty. Several key messages emerge: * Rural communities with the same characteristics (such as area, soil quality, and ethnic background) are actually very heterogeneous in their command of land resources, definition of well-being, range of economic activities, and recommendations for what is needed to overcome poverty. * In times of hardship, families have complemented income from traditional sources (such as subsistence agriculture and small animal husbandry) with earnings from new activities. In addition to migration, which plays a pivotal role in all communities, piecework and weaving are important to income generation in the Sierra, small businesses are important in the Costa, and increased production of cash crops is important in the Oriente. Families have also reduced expenditures on clothing, fiestas, and food. Spending less on food is alarming as malnutrition rates in rural Ecuador are already very high. * Poor rural families express very practical solutions to overcoming poverty. They don't demand sweeping changes, such as expropriation of land from large farmers. Overwhelmingly, they suggest measures that will make available land and human resources more productive. Almost half the suggestions from poor rural families have to do with infrastructure. Many families also want training courses (both agricultural and nonagricultural). This paper -- a product of the Country Operations Division 1, Latin America and the Caribbean, Country Department III -- is part of a larger effort in the department to combine qualitative and quantitative analysis into economic and sector work
Distinguishing between types of data and methods of collecting them by Jesko Hentschel( file )
12 editions published between 1998 and 1999 in English and Undetermined and held by 71 libraries worldwide
April 1998 In the quantitative-qualitative debate, analysts often fail to make a clear distinction between methods of data collection used and types of data generated. Using characteristic information needs for health planning derived from data on the use of health services, this paper shows that each combination of method (contextual or noncontextual) and data (quantitative or qualitative) is a unique primary source of information. Hentschel examines the role of different data collection methods-including the types of data they produce-in the analysis of social phenomena in developing countries. He points out that one confusing factor in the quantitative-qualitative debate is that a distinction is not clearly made between methods of data collection used and types of data generated. He maintains the divide between quantitative and qualitative types of data but analyzes methods according to their contextuality: the degree to which they try to understand human behavior in the social, cultural, economic, and political environment of a given place. He emphasizes that it is most fruitful to think of both methods and data as lying on a continuum stretching from more to less contextual methodology and from more to less qualitative data output. Using characteristic information needs for health planning derived from data on the use of health services, he shows that each combination of method (more or less contextual) and data (more or less qualitative) is a unique primary source that can fulfill different information requirements. He concludes that: * Certain information about health utilization can be obtained only through contextual methods-in which case strict statistical representability must give way to inductive conclusions, assessments of internal validity, and replicability of results. * Often contextual methods are needed to design appropriate noncontextual data collection tools. * Even where noncontextual data collection methods are needed, contextual methods can play an important role in assessing the validity of the results at the local level. * In cases where different data collection methods can be used to probe general results, the methods can-and need to be-formally linked. This paper-a product of the Poverty Group, Poverty Reducation and Economic Management Network-is part of a larger effort in the network to combine research methods from different disciplines in the design of poverty reduction strategies. The author may be contacted at jhentschel@worldbank.org
Bundling services and household welfare in developing countries the case of Peru by Alberto Chong( file )
4 editions published between 2004 and 2013 in English and Undetermined and held by 39 libraries worldwide
Household welfare measurement and the pricing of basic services by Jesko Hentschel( Book )
10 editions published between 1998 and 1999 in English and held by 37 libraries worldwide
November 1998 In many countries, markets for basic services such as electricity, water, or gas are characterized by rationing, subsidies, or increasing marginal tariff pricing. If consumption is used as a welfare indicator, household's different access to, and payments for, such publicly provided services have to be taken into account. Hentschel and Lanjouw discuss when and how to adjust expenditures derived from household surveys to reflect the consumption of basic services. They discuss simple adjustment methods for markets that are subsidized, rationed, or subject to increasing marginal tariff pricing. Using Ecuador as an example, they show how incorporating adjustments in markets for water, electricity, and cooking gas can significantly alter estimates of poverty and are therefore important to a comprehensive measure of welfare. For Ecuador, adjustments must be made for water, for example, because the nonpoor urban population often has access to subsidized public water and the poor depend on the private market; adjustments must be made for electricity because increasing marginal tariff rates lead to different prices per kWh. Adjustments need not be made for cooking gas, which is highly subsidized in Ecuador, because the amount consumers use is not rationed. The authors compare the sensitivity of poverty indicators and the poverty profile in Ecuador to adjustments in nominal expenditures for basic services in Ecuador. The poverty profile showed relatively few changes, but poverty indicators (headcount and the poverty gap for extreme poverty) showed changes that were statistically significant. The results dramatize how important it is to carefully analyze markets for basic services when deriving welfare measures from household surveys. Such adjustments, by improving the measure of welfare, can also encourage wider acceptance and use of consumption as a welfare indicator and a guide for developing public policy. This paper-a joint product of the Poverty Group, Poverty Reduction and Economic Management Network and the Development Research Group-is part of a larger effort in the Bank to develop guidelines and tools for welfare analyses based on household surveys. Jesko Hentschel may be contacted at jhentschel@worldbank.org
Using rapid city surveys to inform municipal social policy an application in Cali, Colombia by Jesko Hentschel( file )
3 editions published between 2004 and 2013 in English and Undetermined and held by 37 libraries worldwide
"Many developing countries assign local governments increasing responsibilities in fighting poverty. This requires local social policy to go beyond the execution of centrally designed and funded education and health programs. Hence, local governments and their partners have both an opportunity and a need to analyze key local bottlenecks for poverty reduction and social development. Drawing on an example from Cali, Colombia, Hentschel describes a tool for such policy formulation at the local level a rapid city household survey. Although the survey uses pre-coded and closed- ended questions, it is contextual in the sense that it is tailor-made to social and economic conditions in Cali. The survey places particular emphasis on collecting key quantitative information, such as household welfare and service access, as well as qualitative information, such as service evaluations and population priorities. Combining the quantitative and qualitative data allows, for example, the mapping of population budget priorities or service satisfaction levels by welfare group. Rapid city household surveys could provide an important tool for the development of local social policies. This paper "a joint product of the Human Development Sector Unit, and the Finance, Private Sector, and Infrastructure Unit, Latin America and the Caribbean Region" is part of a larger effort in the region to support local and municipal governments in the formulation of social policies"--World Bank web site
Household welfare measurement and the pricing of basic services by Jesko Hentschel( file )
2 editions published between 1998 and 1999 in Undetermined and English and held by 36 libraries worldwide
The city poverty assessment a primer by Jesko Hentschel( file )
1 edition published in 2000 in English and held by 33 libraries worldwide
With the help of one's neighbors externalities in the production of nutrition in Peru by Harold Alderman( file )
1 edition published in 2001 in English and held by 33 libraries worldwide
Combining census and survey data to study spatial dimensions of poverty a case study of Ecuador ( file )
1 edition published in 1998 in English and held by 33 libraries worldwide
Trade and growth in Ecuador - a partial equilibrium view by Jesko Hentschel( Book )
6 editions published in 1994 in English and held by 29 libraries worldwide
With the help of one's neighbors : externalities in the production of nutrition in Peru by Harold Alderman( Book )
9 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 29 libraries worldwide
June 2001 Public and private investments in education and infrastructure (such as water and sanitation infrastructure) for one household carry over to neighboring households. Shared knowledge has a significant impact on children's nutrition in rural areas. There is a direct link between the caregivers' education and their children's health status and an additional impact from living near neighbors with more education. Both public and private resources contribute to children's nutritional status. And investments by one household may improve health in other neighborhood households by improving the sanitation environment and increasing shared knowledge. Alderman, Hentschel, and Sabates measure the externalities of investments in nutrition by indicating the impact of women's education in Peruvian neighborhoods on children's nutrition in other households, after controlling for those households' education and income. They find that in rural areas this shared knowledge has a significant impact on nutrition. The coefficient of an increase in the average education in the neighborhood is appreciably larger than the coefficient of education in isolation. That is, educating women in rural areas improves all children's nutritional status even for those whose caregivers are themselves not educated. In both urban and rural areas, they observe externalities from investments in sanitation made by neighboring households. They do not find the same externalities in the case of investments only in the household water supply. There is a direct link between the caregivers' education and their children's health status. Education transmits information about health and nutrition. It teaches numeracy and literacy, which help caregivers read labels and instructions. By exposing caregivers to new environments, it makes then receptive to modern medical treatment. It gives women the confidence to participate in decisionmaking within a household, and it gives men and women the confidence to interact with health care professionals. This paper--a joint product of Poverty, Development Research Group and the Poverty Division, Poverty Reduction and Economic Management Network--is part of a larger effort in the Bank to better understand the impact of public services. The authors may be contacted at halderman@worldbank.org, jhentschel@worldbank.org, or rsabates@students.wisc.edu
Using rapid city surveys to inform municipal social policy : an application in Cali, Colombia by Jesko Hentschel( Book )
6 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 28 libraries worldwide
"Many developing countries assign local governments increasing responsibilities in fighting poverty. This requires local social policy to go beyond the execution of centrally designed and funded education and health programs. Hence, local governments and their partners have both an opportunity and a need to analyze key local bottlenecks for poverty reduction and social development. Drawing on an example from Cali, Colombia, Hentschel describes a tool for such policy formulation at the local level - a rapid city household survey. Although the survey uses pre-coded and closed- ended questions, it is contextual in the sense that it is tailor-made to social and economic conditions in Cali. The survey places particular emphasis on collecting key quantitative information, such as household welfare and service access, as well as qualitative information, such as service evaluations and population priorities. Combining the quantitative and qualitative data allows, for example, the mapping of population budget priorities or service satisfaction levels by welfare group. Rapid city household surveys could provide an important tool for the development of local social policies. This papera joint product of the Human Development Sector Unit, and the Finance, Private Sector, and Infrastructure Unit, Latin America and the Caribbean Regionis part of a larger effort in the region to support local and municipal governments in the formulation of social policies"--World Bank web site
Combining census and survey data to study spatial dimensions and poverty : a case study of Ecuador ( Book )
2 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 27 libraries worldwide
Bundling of services and household welfare in developing countries : the case of Peru by Alberto Chong( Book )
5 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 23 libraries worldwide
Using panel data for Peru for 1994-2000, Chong, Hentschel, and Saavedra find that when households receive two or more services jointly, the welfare increases, as measured by changes in consumption, are larger than when services are provided separately. The increases appear to be more than proportional, as F-tests on the coefficients of the corresponding regressors confirm. Thus, the authors find that bundling services may help realize welfare effects. This paper--a joint product of the Human Development Department and the Poverty Sector Unit, Latin America and the Caribbean Region, in cooperation with the research department of the Inter-American Development Bank--is part of a larger effort to understand the microeconomic determinants of household welfare changes in developing countries
Availability of intermediate and capital goods in import-restrained debtor countries by Jesko Hentschel( Book )
4 editions published in 1990 in English and held by 15 libraries worldwide
Combining census and survey data to study spatial dimensions of poverty : a case study of Ecuador by Jesko Hentschel( Book )
9 editions published between 1998 and 1999 in English and held by 5 libraries worldwide
June 1998 Combining sample survey data and census data can yield predicted poverty rates for all households covered by the census. This offers a means to construct detailed poverty maps. But standard errors on the estimated poverty rates are not negligible. Poverty maps, providing information on the spatial distribution of living standards, are an important tool for policymaking and economic research. Policymakers can use such maps to allocate transfers and inform policy design. The maps can also be used to investigate the relationship between growth and distribution inside a country, thereby complementing research using cross-country regressions. The development of detailed poverty maps is difficult because of data constraints. Household surveys contain data on income or consumption but are typically small. Census data cover a large sample but do not generally contain the right information. Poverty maps based on census data but constructed in an ad-hoc manner can be unreliable. Hentschel, Lanjouw, Lanjouw, and Poggi demonstrate how sample survey data and census data can be combined to yield predicted poverty rates for all households covered by the census. This represents an improvement over ad hoc poverty maps. However, standard errors on the estimated poverty rates are not negligible, so additional efforts to cross-check results are warranted. This paper-a joint product of the Development Research Group and the Poverty Reduction and Economic Management Network, Poverty Division-is part of a larger effort in the Bank to study the spatial distribution and determinants of poverty. Jesko Hentschel may be contacted at jhentschel@worldbank.org
 
moreShow More Titles
fewerShow Fewer Titles
Alternative Names
Hentschel, Jesko
Hentschel, Jesko S.
Hentschell, J. 1962-
Languages
English (145)
Covers
Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.