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Chenault, Lawrence 1877-

Overview
Works: 30 works in 62 publications in 1 language and 674 library holdings
Genres: Drama  Silent films  Race films  Short films  Slapstick comedy films  Independent films  Musical films  Low budget films  Film adaptations  Detective and mystery films 
Roles: Actor
Classifications: PN1995.9.N4, 791.4372
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about Lawrence Chenault
Publications by Lawrence Chenault
Most widely held works by Lawrence Chenault
Pioneers of African-American cinema ( visu )
1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 171 libraries worldwide
Among the most fascinating chapters of film history is that of the so-called "race films" that flourished in the 1920s -'40s. Unlike the "black cast" films produced within the Hollywood studio system, these films not only starred African Americans but were funded, written, produced, edited, distributed, and often exhibited by people of color. Entrepreneurial filmmakers built an industry apart from the Hollywood establishment, cultivating visual and narrative styles that were uniquely their own
Paul Robeson : outsider ( visu )
1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 124 libraries worldwide
Body and soul: Tells the story of a minister gone corrupt. He associates with the owner of a house of gambling, forces a girl to steal, and later kills the girl's brother. Yet, when all is said and done, it's only a dream. Borderline: Set in a Swiss mountain resort town, tells the story of Adah, a black woman who has an affair with Thorne, a white man, then attempts to reconcile with her husband Pete, and eventually leaves town. Thorne's wife Astrid goes mad and cuts Thorne's face and arm with a knife, then mysteriously dies. After Thorne is tried and acquitted, the mayor sends Pete a letter asking him to leave town for the good of all concerned
Body and soul ( visu )
9 editions published between 1986 and 2014 in English and held by 111 libraries worldwide
An article about an escaped prisoner posing as a preacher causes a terrible nightmare for the readers
Veiled aristocrats ( visu )
10 editions published between 1932 and 2007 in English and No Linguistic Content and held by 79 libraries worldwide
Twenty years after leaving home, John Walden returns, having achieved his ambition to become a lawyer. He and his mother, Molly, discuss the marital situation of his sister, Rena, and the racial complications it poses. Molly asks John to break up Rena's romance with Frank because she disapproves of him and wants her daughter to marry a man of more refinement. Eventually, after trying to live the life her family desires for her, Rena renounces trying to pass for white, and is reunited with Frank
Ten minutes to live ( visu )
9 editions published between 1980 and 2014 in English and held by 60 libraries worldwide
A mystery-musical built around a threatening note which gives the heroine only "ten minutes to live." The heroine sings and dances in a Harlem nightclub. Much nightclub business as the mystery unravels with song and dance numbers and a stand up comedy routine. A fine example of the film-making efforts from the pioneer African-American directors and production companies of the 1930's, who made films that were typically excluded from mainstream movie houses due to the prevailing attitudes of the time
Pioneers of African-American cinema ( visu )
1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 27 libraries worldwide
Includes the films The Girl From Chicago; Ten Minutes to Live; Veiled Aristocrats; and Birthright. Also contains the extras "Veiled Aristocrats" (original trailer) and "Birthright" (theatrical trailer)
Pioneers of African-American cinema ( visu )
1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 27 libraries worldwide
Includes the films Regeneration; The Flying Ace; The Nights in a Bar Room; Rev. S. S. Jones Home Movies; and The Scar of Shame. Also contains the extras "The Color Line"; "Ten Nights in a Bar Room: Introduction"; and "About the Restoration"
The scar of shame ( visu )
3 editions published between 1996 and 2009 in English and held by 22 libraries worldwide
A story about an ill-matched marriage between a black concert pianist and a poor, lower class young black woman. Secretly ashamed of her, the young man keeps his wife hidden from his socially-prominent middle-class mother. Despite the melodrama, it is a strong statement on the issues of class and the color caste system which existed within the African American community, as well as probing questions of ambition and authority. This was the first film of the colored Players Film Corporation of Philadelphia
Miracle in Harlem ; Ten minutes to live ( visu )
1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 17 libraries worldwide
Ten minutes to live: While singers, dancers and comedians entertain in a crowded nightclub, a beautiful girl in the audience receives a note that she has "ten minutes to live." She is not the only one in danger as blood will be spilled before the last curtain falls
The symbol of the unconquered : a story of the Ku Klux Klan ( visu )
6 editions published between 1998 and 2009 in English and held by 8 libraries worldwide
Eve, a young light-skinned African American woman, travels from Selma, Alabama to the Northwest to claim the mine willed to her by her grandfather. Hugh, an African American man who falls in love with her but thinks that she is white, discovers oil, provoking the greed and anger of the Ku Klux Klan. The Klan attacks but is driven off. Finally, Eve and Hugh resolve their misunderstanding
Pioneers of African American Cinema ( visu )
1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 4 libraries worldwide
A collection of nineteen digitally restored feature films, as well as a number of short films, fragments, and documentaries from the 1920s-40s, known as 'race films.'
Scar of shame ( visu )
1 edition published in 1998 in English and held by 3 libraries worldwide
In no film was the racial theme more apparent than in this story about an ill-matched marriage between a black concert pianist and a poor, lower class young black woman. Secretly ashamed of her, the young man keeps his wife hidden from his socially-prominent middle-class mother. Despite the melodrama, it is a strong statement on the issues of class and the color caste system which existed within the African-American community, as well as probing questions of ambition and authority. This was the first film of the Colored Players Film Corp. of Philadelphia
Pioneers of African-American cinema ( visu )
1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 library worldwide
The symbol of the unconquered: “The symbol of the unconquered is a response, of sorts, to D.W. Griffith’s The birth of a nation. In Micheaux’s rendition, the Klan (here renamed the Knights of the Black Cross) is not an organization devoted to recial purity, but a gang of common thieves using violenct and intimidation to stead a prospector’s valuable property”--booklet
[Veiled aristocrats--excerpts] ( visu )
1 edition published in 1932 in English and held by 1 library worldwide
Twenty years after leaving home, John Walden returns, having achieved his ambition to become a lawyer. He and his mother, Molly, discuss the marital situation of his sister, Rena, and the racial complications it poses. Molly asks John to break up Rena's romance with Frank because she disapproves of him and wants her daughter to marry a man of more refinement. At a nightclub, a woman says she will tell the story of the Waldens, and a waitress sings a song with piano accompaniment
Oscar Micheaux's Ten minutes to live ( visu )
1 edition published in 1932 in English and held by 1 library worldwide
A mystery-musical built around a threatening note which gives the heroine who sings and dances in a Harlem nightclub only "ten minutes to live." There is much nightclub entertainment as the mystery unravels with song and dance numbers and a stand up comedy routine
Pioneers of African-American cinema ( visu )
1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 library worldwide
Among the most fascinating chapters of film history is that of the so-called "race films" that flourished in the 1920s -'40s. Unlike the "black cast" films produced within the Hollywood studio system, these films not only starred African Americans but were funded, written, produced, edited, distributed, and often exhibited by people of color. Entrepreneurial filmmakers built an industry apart from the Hollywood establishment, cultivating visual and narrative styles that were uniquely their own
Pioneers of African-American cinema ( visu )
1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 library worldwide
The scar of shame: “When a young woman (Lucia Moses) escapes from her abusive father (William E. Pettus), she is rescued by an aspiring composer (Harry Henderson), but encounters opposition from his class-conscious mother. This edition of The sca of shame includes four minutes of newly-restored material”—booklet
Pioneers of African-American cinema ( visu )
1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 library worldwide
Eleven P.M.: “Produced in Detroit, Michigan by little-known African-American filmmaker Richard Maurice, Eleven P.M. is a surreal melodrama in which a poor violinist named Sundaisy (Maurice) tries to protect an orphaned girl (Wanda Mauice) from a small-time hoodlum. The story, which may or may not be a dream concocted by a struggling newspaperman, has one of the most bizarre endings in film history, when a spirit of the deceased Sundaisy possesses the body of a dog in order to take veneance upon the crook”—booklet
Pioneers of African-American cinema ( visu )
1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 library worldwide
Within our gates: “Within our gates is the earliest surviving feature film by an African-American director. It was Oscar Micheaux’s second film (after 1919’s The homesteader, now lost), and involves an idealistic young woman named Sylvia Landry (Evelyn Preer, one of the first great stars of the race film), who attempts to raise money for an elementary school to serve the black community (a premise that would be echoed in Micheaux’s Birthright [1938]). In the course of navigating the racial politics of both the black and white communities, Sylvia’s past is revealed in a series of flashbacks that contain the film’s most notorious sequence: the lynching of her parents by a white mob. Micheaux’s staging of the scene is startling in its bluntness and speaks volumes about the director’s fearlessness and willingness to address taboo subject matter. The film touches up on other themes that would recur throughout the controversial filmmaker’s career, such as the promise of rural life vs. the corruptive influence of the city, and the use of religion as a means of misleading the black community”—booklet. flying ace: “Unlike his 1923 film Regeneration, Richard Norman’s The flying ace exists in its enterety, and the image quality is stunning. A rural crime drama revolving around a pair of rival aviators, The flying ace illuminates the fact that many films made for African-American audiences were less concerned with race than with making popular entertainment in the traditional Hollywood style…. Filmed in the Arlington area of Jacksonville, Florida,The flying ace is a unique aviation melodrama in that no airplanes actually leave the ground (the spectacular flight scenes being performed on terra firma, in front of neutral backdrops). Norman divided the film into four chapters, so that exhibitors could show the film as a feature or as a four-episode serial. The film is buoyed by the presence of Norman Studios regular Steve “Peg” Reynolds as the hero’s one-legged sidekick…, who in one momorable scene rides a bicycle while firing a rifle built into the shaft of his crutch”--booklet
 
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English (55)
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