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Lepore, Jill 1966-

Overview
Works: 35 works in 154 publications in 1 language and 13,063 library holdings
Genres: History  Biography  Sources  Fiction  Juvenile works  Historical fiction  Love stories 
Classifications: E302.6.F8, 973
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about Jill Lepore
Publications by Jill Lepore
Most widely held works by Jill Lepore
Book of ages : the life and opinions of Jane Franklin by Jill Lepore( Book )
12 editions published between 2013 and 2014 in English and held by 1,917 libraries worldwide
A revelatory portrait of Benjamin Franklin's youngest sister and a wholly different account of the founding of the United States
The name of war : King Philip's War and the origins of American identity by Jill Lepore( Book )
19 editions published between 1998 and 2013 in English and held by 1,783 libraries worldwide
Publisher description: King Philip's War, the excruciating racial war--colonists against Indians--that erupted in New England in 1675, was, in proportion to population, the bloodiest in American history. Some even argued that the massacres and outrages on both sides were too horrific to "deserve the name of a war." It all began when Philip (called Metacom by his own people), the leader of the Wampanoag Indians, led attacks against English towns in the colony of Plymouth. The war spread quickly, pitting a loose confederation of southeastern Algonquians against a coalition of English colonists. While it raged, colonial armies pursued enemy Indians through the swamps and woods of New England, and Indians attacked English farms and towns from Narragansett Bay to the Connecticut River Valley. Both sides, in fact, had pursued the war seemingly without restraint, killing women and children, torturing captives, and mutilating the dead. The fighting ended after Philip was shot, quartered, and beheaded in August 1676. The war's brutality compelled the colonists to defend themselves against accusations that they had become savages. But Jill Lepore makes clear that it was after the war--and because of it--that the boundaries between cultures, hitherto blurred, turned into rigid ones. King Philip's War became one of the most written-about wars in our history, and Lepore argues that the words strengthened and hardened feelings that, in turn, strengthened and hardened the enmity between Indians and Anglos. She shows how, as late as the nineteenth century, memories of the war were instrumental in justifying Indian removals--and how in our own century that same war has inspired Indian attempts to preserve "Indianness" as fiercely as the early settlers once struggled to preserve their Englishness. Telling the story of what may have been the bitterest of American conflicts, and its reverberations over the centuries, Lepore has enabled us to see how the ways in which we remember past events are as important in their effect on our history as were the events themselves
The whites of their eyes : the Tea Party's revolution and the battle over American history by Jill Lepore( Book )
16 editions published between 2010 and 2011 in English and held by 1,713 libraries worldwide
Asserts that the Tea Party movement prefers to rewrite the history of the American Revolution as anti-intellectual and antipluralist
New York burning : liberty, slavery, and conspiracy in eighteenth-century Manhattan by Jill Lepore( Book )
16 editions published between 2005 and 2013 in English and held by 1,591 libraries worldwide
A chronicle of an alleged eighteenth-century slave conspiracy to destroy New York City explores the social and political climate of the 1730s and 1740s and the implications of the conspiracy in terms of American politics and history
The mansion of happiness : a history of life and death by Jill Lepore( Book )
8 editions published between 2012 and 2013 in English and held by 1,372 libraries worldwide
A history of American ideas about life and death from before the cradle to beyond the grave
Blindspot : by a Gentleman in Exile and a Lady in Disguise by Jane Kamensky( Book )
5 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 1,034 libraries worldwide
In Boston in 1764, the sudden death of revolutionary leader Samuel Bradstreet causes Scottish portrait painter Stewart Jameson and his apprentice Francis Weston--who is really a fallen woman from an elite family disguised as a boy--to search for the truth
The story of America : essays on origins by Jill Lepore( Book )
9 editions published between 2012 and 2014 in English and held by 997 libraries worldwide
In this book, the author investigates American origin stories, from John Smith's account of the founding of Jamestown in 1607 to Barack Obama's 2009 inaugural address, in order to show how American democracy is bound up with the history of print. It excavates the origins of everything from the paper ballot and the Constitution to the I.O.U. and the dictionary. It presents readings of Benjamin Franklin's Way to Wealth, Thomas Paine's Common Sense, The Raven by Edgar Allan Poe, and Paul Revere's Ride by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, as well as histories of lesser-known genres, including biographies of presidents, novels of immigrants, and accounts of the Depression. From past to present, the author argues, Americans have wrestled with the idea of democracy by telling stories; here, she offers both a history of origin stories and a meditation on storytelling itself
Encounters in the New World : a history in documents by Jill Lepore( Book )
7 editions published between 1999 and 2002 in English and held by 932 libraries worldwide
A collection of documents illustrating encounters between Native American peoples and a variety of European newcomers from the fifteenth to the eighteenth centuries. Includes maps, journals, advertisements, and letters
A is for American : letters and other characters in the newly United States by Jill Lepore( Book )
11 editions published between 2002 and 2013 in English and held by 809 libraries worldwide
A study of the ways in which language was used in the early American republic to define national character and shape national boundaries focuses on the contributions of seven men who worked with alphabets, codes, and signs
Blindspot a novel by a Gentleman in Exile and a Lady in Disguise by Jane Kamensky( Sound Recording )
3 editions published between 2008 and 2009 in English and held by 179 libraries worldwide
Set in Boston during the American Revolution, this tale weaves a tangled web of colorful characters ranging from painters and apprentices to revolutionary leaders that mixes together history, fiction, love, and mystery
Blindspot by a Gentleman in Exile and a Lady in Disguise by Jane Kamensky( file )
6 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 177 libraries worldwide
Set in Boston during the American Revolution, this tale weaves a tangled web of colorful characters ranging from painters and apprentices to revolutionary leaders that mixes together history, fiction, love, and mystery
Blindspot : a gentlman in exile and a lady in disguise by Jane Kamensky( Book )
3 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 153 libraries worldwide
"Written with wit and exuberance by two longtime friends and accomplished historians and set in rebellious Boston on the eve of the American Revolution, Blindspot ingeniously weaves together the stories of Scottish portrait painter and notorious libertine Stewart Jameson and Fanny Easton, a fallen woman from one of Boston's most powerful families who disguises herself as a boy to become Jameson's defiant and seductive apprentice, Francis Weston" -- from publisher's web site
The mansion of happiness a history of life and death by Jill Lepore( Sound Recording )
6 editions published between 2012 and 2013 in English and held by 144 libraries worldwide
Renowned Harvard scholar and New Yorker staff writer Jill Lepore has written a strikingly original, ingeniously conceived and beautifully crafted history of American ideas about life and death from before the cradle to beyond the grave. Investigating the surprising origins of the stuff of everyday life, from board games to breast pumps, the author argues that the age of discovery, Darwin, and the Space Age turned ideas about life on earth topsy-turvy
Book of ages the life and opinions of Jane Franklin by Jill Lepore( Sound Recording )
4 editions published between 2013 and 2014 in English and held by 88 libraries worldwide
A portrait of Benjamin Franklin's youngest sister, Jane, reveals how she was, like her brother, a passionate reader, gifted writer, and shrewd political commentator who made insightful observations about early America
New York burning liberty, slavery, and conspiracy in eighteenth-century Manhattan by Jill Lepore( Sound Recording )
5 editions published between 2005 and 2009 in English and held by 73 libraries worldwide
A chronicle of an alleged eighteenth-century slave conspiracy to destroy New York City explores the social and political climate of the 1730s and 1740s and the implications of the conspiracy in terms of American politics and history
Blindspot : a novel by Jane Kamensky( Book )
2 editions published between 2009 and 2013 in English and held by 44 libraries worldwide
In Boston in 1764, the sudden death of revolutionary leader Samuel Bradstreet causes Scottish portrait painter Stewart Jameson and his apprentice Francis Weston, to search for the truth. Jameson is a Scottish portrait painter who, having fled his debtors in Edinburgh, has washed up on America's far shores. Eager to begin anew in this new world, he advertises for an apprentice, but the lad who comes knocking is no lad at all. Fanny Easton is a lady in disguise, a young, fallen woman from Boston's most prominent family; she becomes Jameson's defiant and seductive apprentice, Francis Weston. Liberty is what everyone's seeking in boisterous, rebellious Boston on the eve of the American Revolution. But everyone suffers from a kind of blind spot, too. Jameson, distracted by his haunted past, can't see that Fanny is a woman; Fanny, consumed with her own masquerade, can't tell that Jameson is falling in love with her. The city's Sons of Liberty can't quite see their way clear, either. "Ably do they see the shackles Parliament fastens about them," Jameson writes, "but to the fetters they clasp upon their own slaves, they are strangely blind."
The Secret History of Wonder Woman by Jill Lepore( Book )
3 editions published in 2014 in English and held by 18 libraries worldwide
Wonder Woman, created in 1941, is the most popular female superhero of all time. Aside from Superman and Batman, no superhero has lasted as long or commanded so vast and wildly passionate a following. In the more than seven decades since she first appeared, her comic books have never been out of print. In years of interviews and archival research, Harvard historian and New Yorker staff writer Jill Lepore has uncovered an astonishing trove of documents, including the never-before-seen private papers of William Moulton Marston, Wonder Woman's creator. Lepore has discovered that, from Marston's days as a Harvard undergraduate, he was influenced by early suffragists and feminists, starting with the British suffragist Emmeline Pankhurst, who was banned from speaking on campus in 1911, when Marston was a freshman. In the 1920s, Marston and his wife brought into their home, as Marston's mistress, the niece of Margaret Sanger, one of the most influential figures of the twentieth century. The Marston family story--a house of one man, three women, and four children--is a story of drama, intrigue, and irony. In the 1930s, Marston and Sanger's niece together wrote a regular column for Family Circle celebrating conventional family life, even as they pursued a life of extraordinary nonconformity. No less fascinating is Marston's role as the inventor of the lie detector. Internationally known as an expert on truth, he lived a life of secrets--only to spill them on the pages of the Wonder Woman comics he began writing in 1941. The Secret History of Wonder Woman is a tour de force of intellectual and cultural history, explaining not only the mysterious origins of the world's most famous female superhero, but solving some of the most vexing puzzles in the American past. Wonder Woman, Lepore argues, is the missing link in the history of the struggle for women's rights--a chain of events that begins with the women's suffrage campaigns of the early 1900s and ends with the troubled place of feminism a century later
A teacher's guide to Encounters in the New World a history in documents ( Computer File )
1 edition published in 2002 in English and held by 12 libraries worldwide
New York burning : liberty and slavery in an eighteenth-century city by Jill Lepore( Book )
1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 10 libraries worldwide
A chronicle of an alleged eighteenth-century slave conspiracy to destroy New York City explores the social and political climate of the 1730s and 1740s and the implications of the conspiracy in terms of American politics and history
The name of war : waging, writing, and remembering King Philip's War by Jill Lepore( Archival Material )
1 edition published in 1995 in English and held by 2 libraries worldwide
 
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English (138)
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