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Rodríguez, Jesusa

Overview
Works: 73 works in 119 publications in 3 languages and 163 library holdings
Genres: Televised operas  Filmed operas  Nonfiction films  Concert films  Film adaptations  Operas  Drama  Exhibition catalogs  Music videos  Experimental films 
Roles: Director, Performer, Producer, Interviewee, Creator, Actor, Singer, Adapter, Author, Translator, Interviewer
Classifications: M1500.M69, 782.1
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about Jesusa Rodríguez
Publications by Jesusa Rodríguez
Most widely held works about Jesusa Rodríguez
 
Most widely held works by Jesusa Rodríguez
Sheila Goloborotko : dez séries de gravuras by Sheila Goloborotko( Book )
2 editions published in 2004 in Portuguese and held by 14 libraries worldwide
Juntos ( visu )
1 edition published in 2013 in Spanish and held by 9 libraries worldwide
Todo, en fin, el silencio lo ocupaba (All things were now overtaken by silence) is a documentary film about the filming of a monologue from Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz's poem First I Dream. It shows actress Jesusa Rodríguez patiently awaiting between takes as the director and crew decide shots, setup lights and move the camera around. The film is a meditation on filmmaking and its process
Que 20 años no es nada by Jesusa Rodríguez( Sound Recording )
3 editions published in 2009 in Spanish and held by 6 libraries worldwide
Foximiliano y Martota ( visu )
4 editions published between 1993 and 2003 in Spanish and held by 5 libraries worldwide
Her 'espectáculos' (as both spectacles and shows) challenge traditional classification, crossing with ease generic boundaries: from elite to popular to mass, from Greek tragedy to cabaret, from pre-Columbian indigenous to opera, from revue, sketch and 'carpa, ' to performative acts within political projects. Humor, satire, linguistic play, and the body are constants in her productions. She seeks to render corporal and, thus, visible, the tensions between the discourses in operation on and through the individual and collective body. Rodriguez's energy is intense and her commitment non-negotiable, always interrogating the nature, site, and consequences of power and its representation. Liliana Felipe, one of Latin America's foremost singers and composers, was born in Argentina in the 1950s. She left for Mexico just before the outbreak of the 'Dirty War' (1976), but her sister and brother-in-law were both 'disappeared'--victims of the military dictatorship's criminal politics
Big mother : el gran desmadre (video para expectáculo) ( visu )
3 editions published in 2002 in Spanish and held by 5 libraries worldwide
Performance video inserts for 'Big Mother: El Gran Desmadre.' Here included are: newscast footage of the terrorist attacks to the World Trade Center in New York City; a spot advertising and introducing Mega Corporation ('a product of the global fusion of the market of perfect autocompetition') in its 'crusade against terrorism;' three Mexican soap opera excerpts; an infomercial by a well-known Mexican actor; a mock newsflash on Big Mother's surveillance cameras (installed in order to observe the Mexican population, looking for possible terrorists against sovereignty of the State); and a spot of 'Bernarda Alba's daughters' in a barren land, waving the Mexican flag. All these footage excerpts complement the show's 'metaphysical' reflection on terrorism, surveillance, and the society of spectacle, in a sorts of 'reality TV' show where metaphysical debates juxtapose with beauty contests, bureaucratic limbos, and theatrical last suppers, searching for Truth amidst a war on Nature and Humanity. Mexican director, actress, playwright, performance artist, scenographer, entrepreneur, and social activist Jesusa Rodríguez has been called the most important woman of Mexico. Often referred to as a 'chameleon, ' Rodríguez moves seemingly effortlessly and with vigor across the spectrum of cultural forms, styles, and tones. Her 'espectáculos' (as both spectacles and shows) challenge traditional classification, crossing with ease generic boundaries: from elite to popular to mass, from Greek tragedy to cabaret, from pre-Columbian indigenous to opera, from revue, sketch and 'carpa, ' to performative acts within political projects. Humor, satire, linguistic play, and the body are constants in her productions. She seeks to render corporal and, thus, visible, the tensions between the discourses in operation on and through the individual and collective body. Rodriguez's energy is intense and her commitment non-negotiable, always interrogating the nature, site, and consequences of power and its representation. Liliana Felipe, one of Latin America's foremost singers and composers, was born in Argentina in the 1950s. She left for Mexico just before the outbreak of the 'Dirty War' (1976), but her sister and brother-in-law were both 'disappeared'--victims of the military dictatorship's criminal politics. Liliana's music has a wide following in Latin America. She continues to be a powerful presence in Argentina, working with human rights organizations--especially H.I.J.O.S. (the organization of the children of the disappeared). In Mexico, Liliana went to one of Jesusa Rodríguez's performances. Jesusa, catching a glimpse of Felipe in the audience, remembers saying to herself: 'I am going to die with that woman.' Since then, Liliana and Jesusa have created two performance spaces, El Cuervo and later El Hábito in Coyoacán, Mexico City, that they still run. They 'married' in February 2000. El Hábito (www.elhabito.com.mx) is a hotbed for intellectuals, feminists, gay rights activists and open-minded, progressive people who want to be engaged by a smart and critical humor. In this off-off space, and with the collaboration of their theater cooperative Las Divas, Jesusa y Liliana have produced hundreds of shows since the 1980s
Homenaje a Cri-Cri ( visu )
2 editions published in 1991 in Spanish and held by 4 libraries worldwide
This cabaret performance is a satiric homage to Mexicos famous songwriter Francisco Gabilondo, whose childrens radio show, broadcasted for almost 30 years (1934-1961) introduced the iconic character Cri-Cri, El Grillito Cantor (Cri-Cri, The Little Singing Grasshopper). Jesusa Rodríguez, playing the part of a sadistic elementary schoolteacher, orchestrates thisrecital of fifth graders (featuring Mexican singers Adriana Díaz de León and Eugenia León, along with the cast from cabaret ensemble Divas), where Gabilondos songs are juxtaposed with satiric interpretations, confronting naïve lyrics with violent behavior, drug dealing, graffiti painting, etc. This social critique is highlighted by the attitude of Jesusas character, a religious teacher aligned to the government in power, whose prejudices are evident in her attempt to conduct a didactic homage while insulting the songwriter, the audience, and the students. The homage, comprising nineteen well-known Cri-Cri songs like La Marcha de las Letras, La Muñeca Fea, Di ⁵Por Qué?, El Comal y la Olla, and El Chorrito, features Paz Águila (famous Mexican bolero singer of the duet Las Hermanas Águila), with an ensemble of grasshopper musicians directed by Liliana Felipe
Cuando el regente nos alcance (video para espectáculo) ( visu )
3 editions published in 1996 in Spanish and held by 4 libraries worldwide
Performance video inserts, projected as a part of the piece 'Cuando el regente nos alcance.' The video skits span from original videos (like a mock version of Alfred Hitchcock's bathtub murder scene, related to Mexico City's drought), to satirical voice-overs for Mexican TV ads and newscasts, in order to expose and discuss the economic polarization, failing infrastructure, political corruption, violation of human rights, mass media manipulation of public opinion, the religious prohibition of birth control methods, and a severe drought affecting Mexico City, in relation to the political campaigns to the regency of the city. Several 'candidates' to the regency are proposed, including Keiko the whale ('all regents are animals ... at least this one needs water as much as the rest of the population'). Biased newscast information is exposed inasmuch as it accents the disparity between the urban crisis and the mirage of urban prosperity advertised by TV commercials, newscasts, and political campaign slogans; the highlighted relationship between the drought and political corruption points to an acknowledgment of how electoral decisions affect 'the future of Mexico ... if there?s such thing.' Mexican director, actress, playwright, performance artist, scenographer, entrepreneur, and social activist Jesusa Rodréguez has been called the most important woman of Mexico. Often referred to as a chameleon, Rodríguez moves seemingly effortlessly and with vigor across the spectrum of cultural forms, styles, and tones. Her espectáculos (as both spectacles and shows) challenge traditional classification, crossing with ease generic boundaries: from elite to popular to mass, from Greek tragedy to cabaret, from pre-Columbian indigenous to opera, from revue, sketch and carpa, to performative acts within political projects. Humor, satire, linguistic play, and the body are constants in her productions. She seeks to render corporal and, thus, visible, the tensions between the discourses in operation on and through the individual and collective body. Rodriguezs energy is intense and her commitment non-negotiable, always interrogating the nature, site, and consequences of power and its representation. Liliana Felipe, one of Latin America's foremost singers and composers, was born in Argentina in the 1950s. She left for Mexico just before the outbreak of the 'Dirty War' (1976), but her sister and brother-in-law were both 'disappeared'--victims of the military dictatorship's criminal politics. Liliana's music has a wide following in Latin America. She continues to be a powerful presence in Argentina, working with human rights organizations--especially H.I.J.O.S. (the organization of the children of the disappeared). In Mexico, Liliana went to one of Jesusa Rodríguez's performances. Jesusa, catching a glimpse of Felipe in the audience, remembers saying to herself: I am going to die with that woman. Since then, Liliana and Jesusa have created two performance spaces, El Cuervo and later El Hábito in Coyoacán, Mexico City, that they still run. They 'married' in February 2000. El Hábito (www.elhabito.com.mx) is a hotbed for intellectuals, feminists, gay rights activists and open-minded, progressive people who want to be engaged by a smart and critical humor. In this off-off space, and with the collaboration of their theater cooperative Las Divas, Jesusa y Liliana have produced hundreds of shows since the 1980s
Matar o no matar ( visu )
2 editions published in 2002 in Spanish and held by 4 libraries worldwide
'To kill, or not to kill? That is the question.' This farcical cabaret performance, featuring Susana Zabaleta and Regina Orozco, poses the 'question' of violence in the context of current Mexican urban society. In a sort of film noir ambiance, the detective/cheerleader characters mix bel canto, circus music, marches, flamenco, rancheras, and pop ballads (musical score by Liliana Felipe) to connect the diverse skits on social violence. The tension between technology and nature (the cult of technology, here called the 'Faith of the Great Father, King Toshiba, ' versus an esoteric, macrobiotic approach to natural forces), the relationship between the Church and the Army as violent power instances (with 'obscenity' as a common tool for the control and manipulation of society), the notion of public surveillance, as well as police brutality, government bureaucracy and political corruption are here juxtaposed to road violence, passion crimes, fashion 'rituals' and star/fan twisted relationships, testing and rethinking the limits of power, discipline and violence. Improvisation and the manipulation of diverse props (guns, masks, wigs) connect the music and the skits to the presence of the audience, aided by the onstage support of director Jesusa Rodríguez as prop assistant. Mexican director, actress, playwright, performance artist, scenographer, entrepreneur, and social activist Jesusa Rodréguez has been called the most important woman of Mexico. Often referred to as a chameleon, Rodríguez moves seemingly effortlessly and with vigor across the spectrum of cultural forms, styles, and tones. Her espectáculos (as both spectacles and shows) challenge traditional classification, crossing with ease generic boundaries: from elite to popular to mass, from Greek tragedy to cabaret, from pre-Columbian indigenous to opera, from revue, sketch and carpa, to performative acts within political projects. Humor, satire, linguistic play, and the body are constants in her productions. She seeks to render corporal and, thus, visible, the tensions between the discourses in operation on and through the individual and collective body. Rodriguezs energy is intense and her commitment non-negotiable, always interrogating the nature, site, and consequences of power and its representation. Liliana Felipe, one of Latin America's foremost singers and composers, was born in Argentina in the 1950s. She left for Mexico just before the outbreak of the 'Dirty War' (1976), but her sister and brother-in-law were both 'disappeared'--victims of the military dictatorship's criminal politics. Liliana's music has a wide following in Latin America. She continues to be a powerful presence in Argentina, working with human rights organizations--especially H.I.J.O.S. (the organization of the children of the disappeared). In Mexico, Liliana went to one of Jesusa Rodríguez's performances. Jesusa, catching a glimpse of Felipe in the audience, remembers saying to herself: I am going to die with that woman. Since then, Liliana and Jesusa have created two performance spaces, El Cuervo and later El Hábito in Coyoacán, Mexico City, that they still run. They 'married' in February 2000. El Hábito (www.elhabito.com.mx) is a hotbed for intellectuals, feminists, gay rights activists and open-minded, progressive people who want to be engaged by a smart and critical humor. In this off-off space, and with the collaboration of their theater cooperative Las Divas, Jesusa y Liliana have produced hundreds of shows since the 1980s
Trucho ( visu )
2 editions published in 2003 in Spanish and held by 4 libraries worldwide
Concert by Liliana Felipe, presenting the release of her album Trucho. "Trucho", an Argentinean adjective meaning "pirate", "illegal", "precarious" or "false", encapsulates the musician's critique to current hemispheric sociopolitical issues, while dedicating her songs to the "nobodies" (the dispossessed, the disempowered) of Latin America. Songs like "Como Madame Bovary", "Pobre gente", "Soñé", "La extranjera", "Si por el vicio", "Java", "Curucucha", "Tertuliano", "Memoria Mnemosina", "No te lo puedo decir", "Nadie se sale con la suya", "Las histéricas" and "Tienes que decidir" are performed and commented by Felipe; the encore featured Jesusa Rodríguez, with a theatrical and comical version of a traditional "huapango", in which the singers play with diverse vocal registers along with the syllables that form the name of the volcano Popocatepetl. The couple then sings "Mujeres del campo", a hymn composed for a series of workshops conducted by the cabaret artists with indigenous Mexican peasant women in the summer of 2002. Felipe ends the concert with the tango "Lo que vos te merecés", as petitioned by the audience, which included writer Elena Poniatowska, publicist Berta "la Chaneca" Maldonado, curator Montserrat Pecanins, actress Ofelia Medina, and deputy Beatriz Paredes, among other renown intellectual, artistic and political figures of current Mexico City public sphere
Interview with Jesusa Rodríguez ( visu )
3 editions published between 2004 and 2010 in Spanish and held by 4 libraries worldwide
Mexican director, actress, playwright, performance artist, scenographer, entrepreneur, and social activist Jesusa Rodríguez moves seemingly effortlessly and with vigor across the spectrum of cultural forms, styles, and tones. Her 'espectáculos' (as both spectacles and shows) challenge traditional classification, crossing with ease generic boundaries: from elite to popular to mass, from Greek tragedy to cabaret, from pre-Columbian indigenous to opera, from revue, sketch and 'carpa, ' to performative acts within political projects. Humor, satire, linguistic play, and the body are constants in her productions. Rodriguez's energy is intense and her commitment non-negotiable, always interrogating the nature, site, and consequences of power and its representation. In this interview the artist comments on her particular use and transformation of the genre of 'pastorela' (Nativity play) in her cabaret performances, as a tool for contesting political and religious fundamentalism in the Americas. The pastorelas, used by the Catholic Church as an evangelization tool during the Conquest, are usually based on a clean-cut distinction between Good and Evil, sustaining a binary thought that has fueled political, cultural and religious agendas in the American hemisphere. Rodríguez proposal to use the pastorela genre against the ideologically conservative institutions that originally introduced and used it, subversively mixes humor with religion in order to contest the Manichean politics at play in contemporary Western society. Performances like 'Concilio de Amor' and 'Pastorela Terrorista' are commented by the artist as examples of this performative strategy, which Rodríguez links to a broader concern with civic empowerment and education, issues of civil disobedience and popular participation
Juicio a Salinas ( visu )
2 editions published in 1995 in Spanish and held by 3 libraries worldwide
Roughly edited video documentation of cabaret performance by renowned artists Jesusa Rodríguez and Liliana Felipe. Juicio a Salinas, a mock trial of former Mexican president Carlos Salinas de Gortari (president of Mexico from 1988 to 1994) at the Teatro Bar El Hábito, is an invitation to civic society to participate in a broader national call for accountability to the Mexican government in the face of charges of corruption, electoral fraud, embezzlement, and political violence. Using humor and improvisation as a tool for starting a public dialogue, the artists invite the audience to participate as a theatrical jury of deputies; in this guise, the public has the opportunity to directly question Salinas (played by a cross-dressed Rodríguez) and ultimately pass judgment on him, deciding whether or not to send him to the Almoloya penitentiary. Among protest chants of El pueblo apoya, Salinas a Almoloya (The people claim it, (send) Salinas to Alomloya) and the song Solidaridad (propaganda theme song for Salinas controversial Programa Nacional de Solidaridad, PRONASOL), the piece is proposed as a performative propitiatory ritual for political justice, rehearsing civic participation in Mexicos public sphere
Macbeth ( visu )
2 editions published in 2002 in Spanish and held by 3 libraries worldwide
Contemporary rendition of the classic Shakespearean tragedy 'Macbeth, ' directed by Jesusa Rodríguez, starring Arturo Ríos and Clarissa Malheiros. Mexican director, actress, playwright, performance artist, scenographer, entrepreneur, and social activist Jesusa Rodríguez has been called the most important woman of Mexico. Often referred to as a 'chameleon, ' Rodríguez moves seemingly effortlessly and with vigor across the spectrum of cultural forms, styles, and tones. Her 'espectáculos' (as both spectacles and shows) challenge traditional classification, crossing with ease generic boundaries: from elite to popular to mass, from Greek tragedy to cabaret, from pre-Columbian indigenous to opera, from revue, sketch and 'carpa, ' to performative acts within political projects. Humor, satire, linguistic play, and the body are constants in her productions. She seeks to render corporal and, thus, visible, the tensions between the discourses in operation on and through the individual and collective body. Rodriguez's energy is intense and her commitment non-negotiable, always interrogating the nature, site, and consequences of power and its representation. Liliana Felipe, one of Latin America's foremost singers and composers, was born in Argentina in the 1950s. She left for Mexico just before the outbreak of the 'Dirty War' (1976), but her sister and brother-in-law were both 'disappeared'--victims of the military dictatorship's criminal politics. Liliana's music has a wide following in Latin America. She continues to be a powerful presence in Argentina, working with human rights organizations--especially H.I.J.O.S. (the organization of the children of the disappeared). In Mexico, Liliana went to one of Jesusa Rodríguez's performances. Jesusa, catching a glimpse of Felipe in the audience, remembers saying to herself: 'I am going to die with that woman.' Since then, Liliana and Jesusa have created two performance spaces, El Cuervo and later El Hábito in Coyoacán, Mexico City, that they still run. They 'married' in February 2000. El Hábito (www.elhabito.com.mx) is a hotbed for intellectuals, feminists, gay rights activists and open-minded, progressive people who want to be engaged by a smart and critical humor. In this off-off space, and with the collaboration of their theater cooperative Las Divas, Jesusa y Liliana have produced hundreds of shows since the 1980s
El derecho de abortar ( visu )
4 editions published in 1998 in Spanish and held by 3 libraries worldwide
Monica 'Lengüinsky' (played by Jesusa Rodríguez) flees to Mexico during the Clinton scandal, becomes a TV writer, and produces 'El Derecho de Abortar, ' a show that is a cross between a 'pastorela' (Nativity play) and a 'telenovela' (soap opera). This 'pastonovela' features Virgin Mary and Joseph of Nazareth as two wealthy Mexicans tormented by the ambiguous sexuality of their cross-dressing son, Jesus Christ. In a failed attempt to 'straighten him out, ' they employ a prostitute ('María Magdalena' Lengüinsky), who ends up discovering that Jesus is really a hermaphrodite, that he is pregnant, and that the father of his unborn child is St. Joseph himself. When Jesus gets an abortion, Lengüinsky sees her chance to profit from the situation: she blackmails the Holy Family by threatening to go public with the truth about Jesus. Putting their own social status first (including Joseph's political career as a candidate to the Mexican presidency), the Holy Family decides to sacrifice Jesus and sells Lengüinsky the copyright to all images of the crucifixion. 'El Derecho de Abortar' is a poignant satirical commentary on the corruption, intolerance, and contradictory morality at work in the catholic-capitalist society of Mexico. Mexican director, actress, playwright, performance artist, scenographer, entrepreneur, and social activist Jesusa Rodréguez has been called the most important woman of Mexico. Often referred to as a chameleon, Rodríguez moves seemingly effortlessly and with vigor across the spectrum of cultural forms, styles, and tones. Her espectáculos (as both spectacles and shows) challenge traditional classification, crossing with ease generic boundaries: from elite to popular to mass, from Greek tragedy to cabaret, from pre-Columbian indigenous to opera, from revue, sketch and carpa, to performative acts within political projects. Humor, satire, linguistic play, and the body are constants in her productions. She seeks to render corporal and, thus, visible, the tensions between the discourses in operation on and through the individual and collective body. Rodriguezs energy is intense and her commitment non-negotiable, always interrogating the nature, site, and consequences of power and its representation. Liliana Felipe, one of Latin America's foremost singers and composers, was born in Argentina in the 1950s. She left for Mexico just before the outbreak of the 'Dirty War' (1976), but her sister and brother-in-law were both 'disappeared'--victims of the military dictatorship's criminal politics. Liliana's music has a wide following in Latin America. She continues to be a powerful presence in Argentina, working with human rights organizations--especially H.I.J.O.S. (the organization of the children of the disappeared). In Mexico, Liliana went to one of Jesusa Rodríguez's performances. Jesusa, catching a glimpse of Felipe in the audience, remembers saying to herself: I am going to die with that woman. Since then, Liliana and Jesusa have created two performance spaces, El Cuervo and later El Hábito in Coyoacán, Mexico City, that they still run. They 'married' in February 2000. El Hábito (www.elhabito.com.mx) is a hotbed for intellectuals, feminists, gay rights activists and open-minded, progressive people who want to be engaged by a smart and critical humor. In this off-off space, and with the collaboration of their theater cooperative Las Divas, Jesusa y Liliana have produced hundreds of shows since the 1980s
El derecho de abortar (video para espectáculo) ( visu )
3 editions published in 1998 in Spanish and held by 3 libraries worldwide
Monica Lengüinsky (played by Jesusa Rodríguez) flees to Mexico during the Clinton scandal, becomes a TV writer, and produces "El Derecho de Abortar", a show that is a cross between a pastorela (Christmas play) and a telenovela (soap opera). This pastonovela features Virgin Mary and Joseph of Nazareth as two wealthy Mexicans tormented by the ambiguous sexuality of their cross-dressing son, Jesus Christ. In a failed attempt to straighten him out, they employ a prostitute ("María Magdalena" Lengüinsky), who ends up discovering that Jesus is really a hermaphrodite, that he is pregnant, and that the father of his unborn child is St. Joseph himself. When Jesus gets an abortion, Lengüinsky sees her chance to profit from the situation: she blackmails the Holy Family by threatening to go public with the truth about Jesus. Putting their own social status first (including Josephs political career as a candidate to the Mexican presidency), the Holy Family decides to sacrifice Jesus and sells Lengüinsky the copyright to all images of the crucifixion. El Derecho de Abortar is a poignant satirical commentary on the corruption, intolerance, and contradictory morality at work in the catholic-capitalist society of Mexico
Pastorela terrorista ( visu )
2 editions published in 2004 in Spanish and held by 3 libraries worldwide
Cabaret performance posing a satiric take on the Manichean thought fueling current Western (conservative) religion, pedagogy, and politics. Farsical characters evidence an Orwellian doublethink, engaging in demagogical discourses of self-righteousness while evidencing the power games at play in school, church, and government. In the context of the US war on Iraq (2003), its Coalition of the Willing and War on Terrorism, a fascist teacher and a flock of angels (political leaders Blair, Aznar, Sharon and Bush) stretch language in rhetorical twists aimed at demonstrating a clear-cut distinction between Good and Evil; a pastorella (Nativity play) evidences their take on terrorism. As an alternative to this political stance, a parodic pseudo-religion or self-help workshop, the Sagrada Iglesia del Intermedio (Sacred Church of Intermission) is introduced by the Goddess of the Interstice, Uncertainty, Paradox and Pleasure (played by Jesusa Rodríguez), advocate of unveiling the ideological agendas underlying binary thought, proposing instead a relativistic gesture of ludic intermediation
Così fan tutte : dramma giocoso in due atti by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart( visu )
1 edition published in 1996 in Spanish and held by 3 libraries worldwide
Comic opera in which two friends disguise themselves and seduce each other's sweethearts for the sake of a bet
Ensalada León Felipe ( visu )
2 editions published in 1991 in Spanish and held by 3 libraries worldwide
This is a hand-held video documentation of an evening of cabaret performance at El Hábito in 1991. It is not a play, but rather a free-flowing interaction between the performers/hostesses and the audience. Liliana Felipe walks on stage wearing a Viking hat and a skin-tight blue bodysuit, helping "Pita Amor" (an elderly Mexican poetess, played by Jesusa Rodríguez) to her seat. While Liliana plays many of the songs in her repertoire, "Pita Amor" reads poems, jokes with the audience, orders Liliana around, and comments on everything from love, to the government, to feminism, all peppered with the periodical request for "un drink" and her repeated assertion "How I hate physical decay!" Among the audience members are Marta Lamas, the founder and director of Debate Feminista (a leading feminist journal in Mexico) and Elena Poniatowska, one of Mexico's most renowned literary figures, about whom Liliana sings a song at the end of the show. This video is a testimony to the kind of space El Hábito is: a hotbed for intellectuals, feminists, gay rights activists and open-minded, progressive people who want to be engaged by a smart and critical humor
Sor Juana en Almoloya ( visu )
3 editions published in 1995 in Spanish and held by 3 libraries worldwide
Jesusa Rodríguez acts the role of Mexican Baroque poet Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz (1648-1695), here supposedly jailed in the Almoloya high security prison in the year 2000. In an anachronistic space that interweaves the 17th and the 20th centuries, she writes a letter to the press condemning the corruption of Carlos Salinas de Gortari's presidency. Brilliantly parodying Sor Juana's sonnets, Rodríguez develops a hilarious plot of transvestite lawyers, lesbian love, malfunctioning computers, and sushi rolls, to critique the state's use of censorship and persecution to silence any voices of dissent
Donna Giovanni ( visu )
2 editions published in 1987 in Spanish and held by 3 libraries worldwide
'Donna Giovanni', Jesusa Rodríguez's adaptation for the theater of Mozart and Da Ponte's opera 'Don Giovanni', is a renowned feminist rendition of the classic by Mexican theater company Divas A.C. Directed by Rodríguez and with musical direction by Alberto Cruzprieto, the play successfully toured Latin America, the United States and Europe, receiving much critical acclaim. 'Donna Giovanni' masterfully utilizes humor, overlapping layers of cross-dressing, and the interplay between music, wordplay and tableaux vivants in order to pose a feminist commentary on sensuality, gender issues, and religious and cultural scenarios of love, deceit, empowerment and desire. Mexican director, actress, playwright, performance artist, scenographer, entrepreneur, and social activist Jesusa Rodríguez has been called the most important woman of Mexico. Often referred to as a 'chameleon, ' Rodríguez moves seemingly effortlessly and with vigor across the spectrum of cultural forms, styles, and tones. Her 'espectáculos' (as both spectacles and shows) challenge traditional classification, crossing with ease generic boundaries: from elite to popular to mass, from Greek tragedy to cabaret, from pre-Columbian indigenous to opera, from revue, sketch and 'carpa, ' to performative acts within political projects. Humor, satire, linguistic play, and the body are constants in her productions. She seeks to render corporal and, thus, visible, the tensions between the discourses in operation on and through the individual and collective body. Rodriguez's energy is intense and her commitment non-negotiable, always interrogating the nature, site, and consequences of power and its representation. Liliana Felipe, one of Latin America's foremost singers and composers, was born in Argentina in the 1950s. She left for Mexico just before the outbreak of the 'Dirty War' (1976), but her sister and brother-in-law were both 'disappeared'--victims of the military dictatorship's criminal politics. Liliana's music has a wide following in Latin America. She continues to be a powerful presence in Argentina, working with human rights organizations--especially H.I.J.O.S. (the organization of the children of the disappeared). In Mexico, Liliana went to one of Jesusa Rodríguez's performances. Jesusa, catching a glimpse of Felipe in the audience, remembers saying to herself: 'I am going to die with that woman.' Since then, Liliana and Jesusa have created two performance spaces, El Cuervo and later El Hábito in Coyoacán, Mexico City, that they still run. They 'married' in February 2000. El Hábito (www.elhabito.com.mx) is a hotbed for intellectuals, feminists, gay rights activists and open-minded, progressive people who want to be engaged by a smart and critical humor. In this off-off space, and with the collaboration of their theater cooperative Las Divas, Jesusa y Liliana have produced hundreds of shows since the 1980s
Cachirulo para adultos : el gigante egoísta ( visu )
3 editions published in 1991 in Spanish and held by 3 libraries worldwide
With no more elixir to transform the country, the girl resorts to the argument that 'it is not with exotic formulas that the country will improve, we require patience, strength, unity.' Cachirulo, indignant, interrupts the political speech, silencing the girl and ending the story. Mexican director, actress, playwright, performance artist, scenographer, entrepreneur, and social activist Jesusa Rodríguez has been called the most important woman of Mexico. Often referred to as a chameleon, Rodríguez moves seemingly effortlessly and with vigor across the spectrum of cultural forms, styles, and tones. Her espectáculos (as both spectacles and shows) challenge traditional classification, crossing with ease generic boundaries: from elite to popular to mass, from Greek tragedy to cabaret, from pre-Columbian indigenous to opera, from revue, sketch and carpa, to performative acts within political projects. Humor, satire, linguistic play, and the body are constants in her productions
 
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English (5)
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