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Koolwal, Gayatri B.

Overview
Works: 13 works in 47 publications in 1 language and 679 library holdings
Roles: Author
Classifications: HD75.9, 338.90072
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about Gayatri B Koolwal
Publications by Gayatri B Koolwal
Most widely held works by Gayatri B Koolwal
Handbook on impact evaluation quantitative methods and practices by Shahidur R Khandker( file )
15 editions published between 2009 and 2010 in English and Undetermined and held by 460 libraries worldwide
Public programs are designed to reach certain goals and beneficiaries. Methods to understand whether such programs actually work, as well as the level and nature of impacts on intended beneficiaries, are main themes of this book. Has the Grameen Bank, for example, succeeded in lowering consumption poverty among the rural poor in Bangladesh? Can conditional cash transfer programs in Mexico and Latin America improve health and schooling outcomes for poor women and children? Does a new road actually raise welfare in a remote area in Tanzania, or is it a "highway to nowhere?" This book reviews quantitative methods and models of impact evaluation. It begings by reviewing the basic issues pertaining to an evaluation of an intervention to reach certain targets and goals. It then focuses on the experimental design of an impact evaluation, highlighting its strengths and shortcomings, followed by discussions on various non-experimental methods. The authors also cover methods to shed light on the nature and mechanisms by which different participants are benefiting from the program. For researchers interested in learning how to use these models with statistical software, the book also provides STATA exercises in the context of evaluating major microcredit programs in Bangladesh, such as the Grameen Bank. The framework presented in this book can be very useful for strengthening local capacity in impact evaluation among technicians and policymakers in charge of formulating, implementing, and evaluating programs to alleviate poverty and underdevelopment
The poverty impact of rural roads evidence from Bangladesh by Shahidur R Khandker( file )
11 editions published in 2006 in English and Undetermined and held by 88 libraries worldwide
"The rationale for public investment in rural roads is that households can better exploit agricultural and nonagricultural opportunities to use labor and capital more efficiently. But significant knowledge gaps remain as to how opportunities provided by roads actually filter back into household outcomes and their distributional consequences. This paper examines the impacts of rural road projects using household-level panel data from Bangladesh. Rural road investments are found to reduce poverty significantly through higher agricultural production, higher wages, lower input and transportation costs, and higher output prices. Rural roads also lead to higher girls' and boys' schooling. Road investments are pro-poor, meaning the gains are proportionately higher for the poor than for the non-poor."--World Bank web site
Estimating the endogenously determined intrahousehold balance of power and its impact on expenditure pattern evidence from Nepal by Gayatri B Koolwal( file )
5 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 77 libraries worldwide
Estimating the Long-Term Impacts of Rural Roads: A Dynamic Panel Approach by Shahidur R Khandker( file )
5 editions published in 2011 in English and Undetermined and held by 16 libraries worldwide
Infrastructure investments are typically long-term. As a result, observed benefits to households and communities may vary considerably over time as short-term outcomes generate or are subsumed by longer-term impacts. This paper uses a new round of household survey as part of a local government engineering department's rural road improvement project financed by the World Bank in Bangladesh to compare the short-term and long-term effects of rural roads over eight years. A dynamic panel model, estimated by generalized method of moments, is applied to estimate the varying returns to public road investment accounting for time-varying unobserved characteristics. The results show that the substantial effects of roads on such outcomes as per capita expenditure, schooling, and prices as observed in the short run attenuate over time. But the declining returns are not common for all outcomes of interest or all households. Employment in the rural non-farm sector, for example, has risen more rapidly over time, indicating increasing returns to investment. The very poor have failed to sustain the short-term benefits of roads, and yet the gains accrued to the middle-income groups are strengthened over time because of changing sectors of employment, away from agriculture toward non-farm activity. The results also show that initial state dependence-or initial community and household characteristics as well as road quality-matters in estimating the trajectory of road impacts
How Does Competition Affect the Performance of MFIs? Evidence from Bangladesh by Shahidur R Khandker( Book )
2 editions published in 2013 in Undetermined and English and held by 15 libraries worldwide
Over the past 20 years, Bangladesh has witnessed strong competition among microfinance institutions. Using program-level panel data from 2005-2010, this paper studies the microfinance institutions' recent competitive roles in their pricing of products, targeting strategies and portfolio shifts, as well as their ability to recover loans. The findings do not support the view that newer microfinance institutions are less risk-averse in their targeting, or that increased borrowing among households due to microfinance institution competition has lowered recovery rates. There is also a considerable urban-rural distinction; although newer microfinance institutions tend to attract riskier clients in urban areas, the opposite is true in rural areas. Loan recovery rates are also the highest among the newest microfinance institutions for women in rural areas, suggesting that microfinance institutions may offer distinct products in these areas to attract better-risk clients. The portfolio of newer microfinance institutions also has a greater share of lending for agriculture, and fewer savings products
Handbook on impact evaluation by Shahidur R Khandker( Book )
2 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 8 libraries worldwide
Does Institutional Finance Matter for Agriculture? Evidence Using Panel Data from Uganda by Shahidur R Khandker( file )
1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 7 libraries worldwide
Smallholder agriculture in many developing countries has remained largely self-financed. However, improved productivity for attaining greater food security requires better access to institutional credit. Past efforts to extend institutional credit to smaller farmers has failed for several reasons, including subsidized operation of government-aided credit schemes. Thus, recent efforts to expand credit for smallholder agriculture that rely on innovative credit delivery schemes at market prices have received much policy interest. However, thus far the impacts of these efforts are not fully understood. This study examines credit for smallholder agriculture in the context of Uganda, where agriculture is about 35 percent of gross domestic product, most farmers are smallholders, and the country has introduced policies since 2005 to extend credit access to the sector. The analysis uses newly available household panel data from Uganda for 2005-2006 and 2009-2010 to examine (a) whether credit effectively targets agriculture, by examining determinants of borrowing across different sources; (b) agricultural and nonagricultural determinants of supply and demand credit constraints among non-borrowers; and (c) the effects of borrowing and credit constraints on household income, consumption, and agricultural outcomes. The analysis finds that although not many households report borrowing specifically for agriculture, credit is fungible and agricultural outcomes do substantially improve with institutional borrowing, particularly microcredit. Among non-borrowers, supply and demand credit constraints have fallen considerably over the period, particularly in rural areas. Access to institutions and infrastructure play a strong role in alleviating the negative effect of credit constraints on welfare outcomes, as well as determining the source of lending among borrowing households
Better access to water raises welfare, but not women's off-farm work by Gayatri B Koolwal( file )
1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 3 libraries worldwide
In the developing world, poor rural women and their children spend considerable time collecting water. Do women living in areas where more time is needed for water collection tend to participate less in income-earning, market-based activities? Do the education outcomes of their children tend to be worse? This note uses micro-data for eight developing countries to examine these questions. Better access to water is not found to be associated with greater off-farm paid work for women, but is associated with less unpaid work. In countries where substantial gender gaps in schooling exist, enrollment for both boys and girls tends to be higher
Household coping and response to government stimulus in an economic crisis : evidence from Thailand ( Computer File )
1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 1 library worldwide
Trends in human resources in Japan : executive summary by Ames Gross( Book )
1 edition published in 1999 in English and held by 1 library worldwide
The poverty impact of rural roads : evidence from Bangladesh by Shahidur R Khandker( Article )
1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 1 library worldwide
The poverty impact of rural roads evidence from Bangladesh by Shahidur R Khandker( Sound Recording )
1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 1 library worldwide
"The rationale for public investment in rural roads is that households can better exploit agricultural and nonagricultural opportunities to use labor and capital more efficiently. But significant knowledge gaps remain as to how opportunities provided by roads actually filter back into household outcomes and their distributional consequences. This paper examines the impacts of rural road projects using household-level panel data from Bangladesh. Rural road investments are found to reduce poverty significantly through higher agricultural production, higher wages, lower input and transportation costs, and higher output prices. Rural roads also lead to higher girls' and boys' schooling. Road investments are pro-poor, meaning the gains are proportionately higher for the poor than for the non-poor. "--World Bank web site
New trends in Japan's medical device market by Ames Gross( Book )
1 edition published in 1998 in English and held by 1 library worldwide
 
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