skip to content

World Bank Development Research Group Poverty Team

Overview
Works: 129 works in 217 publications in 1 language and 2,691 library holdings
Classifications: HG3881.5.W57, 339.20951
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about World Bank
Publications by World Bank
Most widely held works by World Bank
Household income dynamics in rural China by Jyotsna Jalan( file )
5 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 72 libraries worldwide
Is effective social protection an investment with long-term benefits? Does inequality impede growth? Household panel data on incomes in rural China offer some answers
Breaking up the collective farm welfare outcomes of Vietnam's massive land privatization by Martin Ravallion( file )
4 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 61 libraries worldwide
In the decollectivization of agriculture in Vienam, local allocation of land use rights reduced overall inequality, thanks to initial conditions at the time of reform and actions by the center to curtail the power of local elites
Measuring pro-poor growth by Martin Ravallion( file )
4 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 61 libraries worldwide
New tools allow one to study the incidence of economic growth by initial level of income, and to measure the rate of pro-poor growth in an economy. An application is provided using data for China in the 1990s
Assisting the transition from workfare to work a randomized experiment by Emanuela Galasso( file )
4 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 59 libraries worldwide
A wage subsidy increased private sector employment among poor workers in a welfare-dependent region of Argentina, but extra skill training had no impact
Gender and the allocation of adult time evidence from the Peru LSMS panel data by Nadeem Ilahi( file )
4 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 58 libraries worldwide
Analysis of time use data for Peru in 1994 and 1997 shows that women work up to a fifth more than men do and that women in poor households work more than those in rich ones, while there is no difference for men
The social impact of social funds in Jamaica a mixed-methods analysis of participation, targeting, and collective action in community-driven development by Ana María Ibáñez( file )
5 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 55 libraries worldwide
Rao and Ibáñez develop an evaluation method that combines qualitative evidence with quantitative survey data analyzed with propensity score methods on matched samples to study the impact of a participatory community-driven social fund on preference targeting, collective action, and community decisionmaking. The data come from a case study of five pairs of communities in Jamaica where one community in the pair has received funds from the Jamaica social investment fund (JSIF) while the other has not--but has been picked to match the funded community in its social and economic characteristics. The qualitative data reveal that the social fund process is elite-driven and decisionmaking tends to be dominated by a small group of motivated individuals. But by the end of the project there was broad-based satisfaction with the outcome. The quantitative data from 500 households mirror these findings by showing that ex-ante the social fund does not address the expressed needs of the majority of individuals in the majority of communities. By the end of the construction process, however, 80 percent of the community expressed satisfaction with the outcome. An analysis of the determinants of participation shows that better educated and better networked individuals dominate the process. Propensity score analysis reveals that the JSIF has had a causal impact on improvements in trust and the capacity for collective action, but these gains are greater for elites within the community. Both JSIF and non-JSIF communities are more likely now to make decisions that affect their lives which indicates a broad-based effort to promote participatory development in the country, but JSIF communities do not show higher levels of community-driven decisions than non-JSIF communities. The authors shed light on the complex ways in which community-driven development works inside communities--a process that is deeply imbedded within Jamaica's sociocultural and political context. This paper--a product of the Poverty Team, Development Research Group--is part of a larger effort in the group to evaluate community-driven development
Survey compliance and the distribution of income by Johan A Mistiaen( file )
5 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 55 libraries worldwide
While it is improbable that households with different incomes are equally likely to participate in sample surveys, the lack of data for nonrespondents has hindered efforts to correct for the bias in measures of poverty and inequality. Mistiaen and Ravallion demonstrate how the latent income effect on survey compliance can be estimated using readily available data on response rates across geographic areas. An application using the Current Population Survey for the United States indicates that compliance falls as income rises. Correcting for selective compliance appreciably increases mean income and inequality, but has only a small impact on poverty incidence up to commonly used poverty lines in the United States. This paper--a product of the Poverty Team, Development Research Group--is part of a larger effort in the group to develop better methods of measuring poverty and inequality from survey data
Micro-level estimation of welfare by Jean Olson Lanjouw( file )
5 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 54 libraries worldwide
The authors construct and derive the properties of estimators of welfare that take advantage of the detailed information about living standards available in small household surveys and the comprehensive coverage of a census or large sample. By combining the strengths of each, the estimators can be used at a remarkably disaggregated level. They have a clear interpretation, are mutually comparable, and can be assessed for reliability using standard statistical theory. Using data from Ecuador, the authors obtain estimates of welfare measures, some of which are quite reliable for populations as small as 15,000 households--a "town." They provide simple illustrations of their use. Such estimates open up the possibility of testing, at a more convincing intra-country level, the many recent models relating welfare distributions to growth and a variety of socioeconomic and political outcomes. This paper--a product of the Poverty Team, Development Research Group--is part of a larger effort in the group to develop tools for the analysis of poverty and income distribution
Externalities in rural development evidence for China by Martin Ravallion( file )
4 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 54 libraries worldwide
Ravallion tests for external effects of local economic activity on consumption and income growth at the farm-household level using panel data from four provinces of post-reform rural China. The tests allow for nonstationary fixed effects in the consumption growth process. Evidence is found of geographic externalities, stemming from spillover effects of the level and composition of local economic activity and private returns to local human and physical infrastructure endowments. The results suggest an explanation for rural underdevelopment arising from underinvestment in certain externality-generating activities, of which agricultural development emerges as the most important. This paper--a product of the Poverty Team, Development Research Group--is part of a larger effort in the group to better understand the causes of poverty
Wage differentials and state-private sector employment Choice in the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia by Branko Jovanovic( file )
5 editions published between 2002 and 2003 in English and held by 54 libraries worldwide
Lokshin and Jovanovic use the newly available Yugoslavian Labor Force Survey data to investigate wage differentials and employment decisions in the state and private sectors in Yugoslavia. For the analysis the authors use three empirical models that rely on different statistical assumptions. They extend the standard switching regression model to allow non-normality in the joint distribution of the error terms. After correcting for the sector selection bias and controlling for workers' characteristics the authors find a private sector wage advantage. The wage premium is largest for workers with low education levels and declining for workers with higher educational levels. Given the regulatory and tax policies that pushed the private sector into the informal sphere of the economy during the period covered by our data, the authors argue that the state-private wage gap is likely to grow in the future. This will make it increasingly difficult for the state sector to attract and retain highly skilled employees. This paper--a product of the Poverty Team, Development Research Group--is part of a larger effort in the group to understand labor issues in public sector reform
Income convergence during the disintegration of the world economy, 1919-39 by Branko Milanović( file )
4 editions published between 2002 and 2003 in English and held by 54 libraries worldwide
Some economists have argued that the process of disintegration of the world economy between the two world wars led to income divergence between the countries. This is in keeping with the view that economic integration leads to income convergence. The paper shows that the view that the period 1919-39 was associated with divergence of incomes among the rich countries is wrong. On the contrary, income convergence continued and even accelerated. Since the mid-19th century, incomes of rich countries tended to converge in peacetime regardless of whether their economies were more or less integrated. This, in turn, implies that it may not be trade and capital and labor flows that matter for income convergence but some other, less easily observable, forces like diffusion of information and technology. This paper--a product of the Poverty Team, Development Research Group--is part of a larger effort in the group to study global inequality
Ex-ante evaluation of conditional cash transfer programs the case of Bolsa Escola by François Bourguignon( file )
5 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 54 libraries worldwide
Cash transfers targeted to poor people, but conditional on some behavior on their part--such as school attendance or regular visits to health care facilities--are being adopted in a growing number of developing countries. Even where ex-post impact evaluations have been conducted, a number of policy-relevant counterfactual questions have remained unanswered. These are questions about the potential impact of changes in program design--such as benefit levels or the choice of the means-test--on both the current welfare and the behavioral response of household members. Bourguignon, Ferreira, and Leite propose a method to simulate the effects of those alternative program designs on welfare and behavior based on microeconometrically estimated models of household behavior. In an application to Brazil's recently introduced federal Bolsa Escola program, the authors find a surprisingly strong effect of the conditionality on school attendance, but a muted impact of the transfers on the reduction of poverty and inequality levels. This paper--a product of the Poverty Team, Development Research Group--is part of a larger effort in the group to understand the impact of policies on the distribution of incomes
Crime and local inequality in South Africa by Gabriel Demombynes( file )
5 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 53 libraries worldwide
Demombynes and Özler examine the effects of local inequality on property and violent crime in South Africa. Their findings are consistent with economic theories relating inequality to property crime, and also with sociological theories that imply that inequality leads to crime in general. Burglary rates are 20-30 percent higher in police station jurisdictions that are the wealthiest among their neighbors, suggesting that criminals travel to neighborhoods where the expected returns from burglary are highest. The authors do not find evidence that inequality between racial groups fosters interpersonal conflict at the local level. This paper--a product of the Poverty Team, Development Research Group--is part of a larger effort in the group to understand the relationship between income inequality and various outcomes, such as crime, health, and pro-poor growth
Poverty, education, and health in Indonesia : who benefits from public spending? by Peter Lanjouw( Book )
3 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 28 libraries worldwide
Static and dynamic incidence analysis underscores the importance of Indonesia's public spending on primary health care to the poor. In education, evidence suggests that the poor are well represented in primary schooling and would benefit from increased public provisioning of secondary schooling
On the unequal inequality of poor communities by Chris Elbers( Book )
2 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 24 libraries worldwide
Important differences exist between communities with respect to their needs, capacities, and circumstances. As central governments are not able to discern these differences fully, they seek to achieve their policy objectives by relying on decentralized mechanisms that use local information. However, household and individual characteristics within communities can also vary substantially. A growing theoretical literature suggests that inequality within communities can influence policy outcomes, and that this influence could be harmful or helpful, depending on the circumstances. Empirical investigations into the impact of inequality have, to date, largely been held back by a lack of systematic evidence on community-level inequality. The authors use household survey and population census data to estimate per capita consumption inequality within communities in three developing countries: Ecuador, Madagascar, and Mozambique. Communities are found to vary markedly from one another in terms of the degree of inequality they exhibit. The authors also show that there should be no presumption that inequality is less severe in poor communities. They argue that the kind of community-level inequality estimates generated in this paper can be used in designing and evaluating decentralized antipoverty programs. This paper--a product of the Poverty Team, Development Research Group--is part of a larger effort in the group to develop tools for the analysis of poverty and income distribution
Trade, inequality, and the political economy of institutions by Quý Toàn Đõ̂( Book )
2 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 23 libraries worldwide
The authors analyze the relationship between international trade and the quality of economic institutions such as contract enforcement, rule of law, or property rights. The literature on institutions has argued, both empirically and theoretically, that larger firms care less about good institutions and that higher inequality leads to worse institutions. Recent literature on international trade enables the authors to analyze economies with heterogeneous firms, and argue that trade opening leads to a reallocation of production in which large firms grow larger, while small firms become smaller or disappear. Combining these two strands of literature, the authors build a model that has two key features. First, preferences over institutional quality differ across firms and depend on firm size. Second, institutional quality is endogenously determined in a political economy framework. They show that trade opening can worsen institutions when it increases the political power of a small elite of large exporters that prefer to maintain bad institutions. The detrimental effect of trade on institutions is most likely to occur when a small country captures a sufficiently large share of world exports in sectors characterized by economic profits
Land Allocation in Vietnam's Agrarian Transition by Martin Ravallion( Book )
3 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 23 libraries worldwide
While liberalizing key factor markets is a crucial step in the transition from a socialist control-economy to a market economy, the process can be stalled by imperfect information, high transaction costs, and covert resistance from entrenched interests. Ravallion and van de Walle study land-market adjustment in the wake of Vietnam?s reforms aiming to establish a free market in land-use rights following de-collectivization. Inefficiencies in the initial administrative allocation are measured against an explicit counterfactual market solution. The authors? tests using a farm-household panel data set spanning the reforms suggest that land allocation responded positively but slowly to the inefficiencies of the administrative allocation. They find no sign that the transition favored the land rich or that it was thwarted by the continuing power over land held by local officials. This paper-a joint product of the Poverty Team and the Public Services Team, Development Research Group-is part of a larger effort in the group to understand the welfare impacts of major policy reforms
Is inequality in Africa really different? by Branko Milanović( Book )
3 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 23 libraries worldwide
High inequality in Africa is something of a paradox: Africa should be a low-inequality continent according to the Kuznets hypothesis (because African countries are poor and agriculture-based), and also because land (the main asset) is widely shared. Milanovic's hypothesis is that African inequality is politically determined. Yet in the empirical analysis, despite the introduction of several political variables, there is still an inequality-increasing "Africa effect" linked to ethnic fractionalization. The politics, however, may work through ethnic fractionalization, which provides an easy and secure basis for the formation of political groups. Although this is a plausible explanation, it is not fully satisfactory, and the author criticizes it in the concluding section. This paper--a product of the Poverty Team, Development Research Group--is part of a larger effort in the group to study inequality in the world
The impact of the Indonesian financial crisis on children : data from 100 villages survey by Lisa Ann Cameron( Book )
3 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 23 libraries worldwide
School attendance in Indonesia dropped slightly after the onset of the Asian crisis but then rebounded to higher-than-pre-crisis levels. Fewer children are now working, although the older children who are working and are not attending school seem to be working longer hours. Children's health-status appears to be relatively stable
Did social safety net scholarships reduce drop-out rates during the Indonesian economic crisis? by Lisa Ann Cameron( Book )
3 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 23 libraries worldwide
Preliminary evidence favors focusing safety net scholarships (designed to reduce dropout rates during an economic crisis) on lower secondary schools, continuing to target children (especially older students) from large families, scaling back scholarships to private schools at the lower secondary level, or targeting the households hurt most by the crisis
 
moreShow More Titles
fewerShow Fewer Titles
Alternative Names
Languages
English (78)
Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.