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Elbers, Chris

Overview
Works: 42 works in 87 publications in 2 languages and 363 library holdings
Roles: Author, Creator
Publication Timeline
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Publications about Chris Elbers
Publications by Chris Elbers
Most widely held works by Chris Elbers
Re-Interpreting Sub-Group Inequality Decompositions by Chris Elbers( file )
10 editions published between 2005 and 2012 in English and Undetermined and held by 71 libraries worldwide
The authors propose a modification to the conventional approach of decomposing income inequality by population sub-groups. Specifically, they propose a measure that evaluates observed between-group inequality against a benchmark of maximum between-group inequality that can be attained when the number and relative sizes of groups under examination are fixed. The authors argue that such a modification can provide a complementary perspective on the question of whether a particular population breakdown is salient to an assessment of inequality in a country. As their measure normalizes between-group inequality by the number and relative sizes of groups, it is also less subject to problems of comparability across different settings. The authors show that for a large set of countries their assessment of the importance of group differences typically increases substantially on the basis of this approach. The ranking of countries (or different population groups) can also differ from that obtained using traditional decomposition methods. Finally, they observe an interesting pattern of higher levels of overall inequality in countries where their measure finds higher between-group contributions
How Good A Map ? Putting Small Area Estimation To The Test by Gabriel Demombynes( file )
6 editions published between 2007 and 2012 in English and held by 40 libraries worldwide
The authors examine the performance of small area welfare estimation. The method combines census and survey data to produce spatially disaggregated poverty and inequality estimates. To test the method, they compare predicted welfare indicators for a set of target populations with their true values. They construct target populations using actual data from a census of households in a set of rural Mexican communities. They examine estimates along three criteria: accuracy of confidence intervals, bias, and correlation with true values. The authors find that while point estimates are very stable, the precision of the estimates varies with alternative simulation methods. While the original approach of numerical gradient estimation yields standard errors that seem appropriate, some computationally less-intensive simulation procedures yield confidence intervals that are slightly too narrow. The precision of estimates is shown to diminish markedly if unobserved location effects at the village level are not well captured in underlying consumption models. With well specified models there is only slight evidence of bias, but the authors show that bias increases if underlying models fail to capture latent location effects. Correlations between estimated and true welfare at the local level are highest for mean expenditure and poverty measures and lower for inequality measures
Nepal by Chris Elbers( Book )
3 editions published between 1988 and 1990 in Dutch and held by 28 libraries worldwide
Are neighbors equal? : estimating local inequality in three developing countries ( Book )
2 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 10 libraries worldwide
Are neighbours equal? : estimating local inequality in three developing countries by Chris Elbers( Book )
5 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 9 libraries worldwide
Primary education in Zambia by A. A. M. de Kemp( Book )
2 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 8 libraries worldwide
Convergence, shocks and poverty: micro evidence on growth under uncertainty by Chris Elbers( Book )
3 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 5 libraries worldwide
Using a unique panel data set for rural households in Zimbabwe we estimate amicroeconomic model of growth under uncertainty, a stochastic version of the Ramsey modelwith livestock as the single asset. We use the estimation results in simulation experiments(over a 20-year period) to quantify the importance of convergence, household fixed effectsand shocks. First, we find powerful convergence. In the absence of shocks and withouthousehold fixed effects there is rapid growth over the period (5.6% growth p.a. in percapita assets) even though there is no technical progress. The process of adjusting thecapital stock (livestock) to its steady state value is - as expected - strongly equalising:the coefficient of variation (across households) of livestock ownership falls from 78% to6%. Secondly, when we allow for household fixed effects - the case of conditionalconvergence - the aggregate growth rate is very similar but inequality remains highthroughout the period.Finally, we find that shocks have strong and persistent effects. In this model shocksaffect aggregate growth both ex ante and ex post. These effects are strong: shocks reduceaggregate growth over the period by a fifth and increase inequality substantially
General equilibrium models of environmental regulation and international trade by Chris Elbers( Book )
3 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 5 libraries worldwide
Growth regressions and economic theory by Chris Elbers( Book )
3 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 5 libraries worldwide
Welfare in villages and towns : micro-measurement of poverty and inequality by Chris Elbers( Book )
3 editions published in 2000 in English and held by 5 libraries worldwide
Solving the discrete-time stochastic Ramsey Model by Chris Elbers( Book )
2 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 4 libraries worldwide
Investment under risk with discrete and continuous assets : solution and estimation by Chris Elbers( Book )
2 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 3 libraries worldwide
Insurance and rural welfare: what can panel data tell us? by Chris Elbers( Book )
6 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 3 libraries worldwide
Assessing the scope for insurance in rural communities usually requires a structural model of household behavior under risk. One of the few empirical applications of such models is the study by Rosenzweig and Wolpin (1993) who conclude that Indian farmers in the ICRISAT villages would not benefit from the introduction of formal weather insurance. In this paper we investigate how models such as theirs can be estimated from panel data on production and assets. We show that if assets can take only a limited number of values the coefficients of the model cannot be estimated with reasonable precision. We also show that this can affect the conclusion that insurance would not be welfare improving
Assessing budget support with statistical impact evaluation : a methodological proposal by Chris Elbers( Book )
2 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 3 libraries worldwide
Evaluation of development policy : treatment versus program effects by Chris Elbers( Book )
2 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 3 libraries worldwide
Growth and risk : methodology and micro evidence by Chris Elbers( Book )
3 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 2 libraries worldwide
Vulnerability in a stochastic dynamic model by Chris Elbers( Book )
2 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 2 libraries worldwide
Most measures of vulnerability are a-theoretic and essentially static. In this paper we use a stochastic Ramsey model to find a household's optimal welfare and we measure vulnerability as the shortfall from the welfare attained if the household consumed permanently at the poverty line. The results indicate that vulnerability is very sensitive to the time horizon considered. We find that the accuracy of existing regression-based vulnerability measures can be greatly improved by including asset measures in the regression
Estimation of Normal Mixtures in a Nested Error Model with an Application to Small Area Estimation of Poverty and Inequality by Elbers( file )
1 edition published in 2014 in Undetermined and held by 0 libraries worldwide
Evaluation of Development Programs : Randomized Controlled Trials or Regressions? by Chris Elbers( file )
2 editions published in 2013 in English and held by 0 libraries worldwide
Can project evaluation methods be used to evaluate programs: complex interventions involving multiple activities? A program evaluation cannot be based simply on separate evaluations of its components if interactions between the activities are important. In this paper a measure is proposed, the total program effect (TPE), which is an extension of the average treatment effect on the treated (ATET). It explicitly takes into account that in the real world (with heterogeneous treatment effects) individual treatment effects and program assignment are often correlated. The TPE can also deal with the common situation in which such a correlation is the result of decisions on (intended) program participation not being taken centrally. In this context RCTs are less suitable even for the simplest interventions. The TPE can be estimated by applying regression techniques to observational data from a representative sample from the targeted population. The approach is illustrated with an evaluation of a health insurance program in Vietnam
Estimation of normal mixtures in a nested error model with an application to small area estimation of poverty and inequality by Chris Elbers( file )
1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 0 libraries worldwide
This paper proposes a method for estimating distribution functions that are associated with the nested errors in linear mixed models. The estimator incorporates Empirical Bayes prediction while making minimal assumptions about the shape of the error distributions. The application presented in this paper is the small area estimation of poverty and inequality, although this denotes by no means the only application. Monte-Carlo simulations show that estimates of poverty and inequality can be severely biased when the non-normality of the errors is ignored. The bias can be as high as 2 to 3 percent on a poverty rate of 20 to 30 percent. Most of this bias is resolved when using the proposed estimator. The approach is applicable to both survey-to-census and survey-to-survey prediction
 
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Alternative Names
Elbers, Chris
Elbers, Christianus Theodorus Maria
Languages
English (58)
Dutch (3)
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