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Matthews, Hannah

Overview
Works: 32 works in 33 publications in 2 languages and 81 library holdings
Genres: Juvenile works  Fiction  Exhibition catalogs  History 
Roles: Author
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about Hannah Matthews
Publications by Hannah Matthews
Most widely held works about Hannah Matthews
 
Most widely held works by Hannah Matthews
Diolch Sgrwff! by Gwen Redvers Jones( Book )
1 edition published in 2010 in Welsh and held by 12 libraries worldwide
Rhywun yn rhywle- by Tudur Dylan Jones( Book )
1 edition published in 2005 in Welsh and held by 11 libraries worldwide
Johanna Billing : tiny movements by Johanna Billing( Book )
1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 10 libraries worldwide
Maestro by Siân Northey( Book )
1 edition published in 2011 in Welsh and held by 10 libraries worldwide
Clybio by Sandra Morris Jones( Book )
1 edition published in 2007 in Welsh and held by 8 libraries worldwide
Lleidr yn y tŷ by Hilma Lloyd Edwards( Book )
1 edition published in 2006 in Welsh and held by 7 libraries worldwide
The only way out is the only way in : Douglas Gordon by Juliana Engberg( Book )
1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 4 libraries worldwide
The challenges of change : learning from the child care and early education experiences of immigrant families by Hannah Matthews( Book )
1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 3 libraries worldwide
Reaching all children? : understanding early care and education participation among immigrant families by Hannah Matthews( Book )
1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 2 libraries worldwide
PICA's screen selection : an Art on the Move education resource for teachers and students by Lisa Young( Book )
1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 2 libraries worldwide
Winners are grinners : hijacked #9 ( Book )
2 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 2 libraries worldwide
The exhibition investigates the back slapping spirit of winning within Australian culture, while also revealing its darker complexities off the sporting field. Responding to the occasion of the 2006 Commonwealth Games in Melbourne, Winners are Grinners reveals that all that glitters is not gold, or silver, or even bronze! It features seven artists from Melbourne, Perth, Sydney, Brisbane and New Zealand, bringing a diverse range of perspectives and backgrounds to the exhibition. The participating artists work in a variety of mediums and represent a strong cross section of practice by emerging artists today. The exhibition displays water colour snap shots of employees of the month from Melbourne painter, Fiona McMonagle, miniaturised gulf war dramatisations played out across a mini golf course by Perth artist, Bennett Miller and a contemporary wheel of fortune sculpted from a Goodyear tyre by Melbourne-based, Mark Hilton. Perth's Marcus Canning explores the mythology of the win through a single channel projection of a glittering Mt Olympus constructed from golden trophies, while New Zealand artist, Wayne Youle, contributes beauty pageant sashes that bestow a different story on his Maori heritage. Sydney painter, David Griggs, creates a new painting installation framed around his recent residency in the Philippines, and the Brisbane based Indigenous artist Tony Albert draws us closer to home with his photographic and video works Our Cathy and I am, you are, we are Australians
Caught between compassion and control: exploring the challenges associated with inpatient adolescent mental healthcare in an independent hospital ( file )
1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 library worldwide
Abstract: Aim: To extend our understanding of how healthcare assistants construct and manage demanding situations in a secure mental health setting and to explore the effects on their health and well‐being, to provide recommendations for enhanced support. Background: Contemporary literature acknowledges high rates of occupational stress and burnout among healthcare assistants, suggesting the context in which they work places them at elevated risk of physical harm and psychological distress. Yet, there is a deficit of qualitative research exploring the experiences of healthcare assistants in adolescent inpatient facilities. Design: An exploratory multi‐method qualitative approach was used to collect data about the challenges faced by healthcare assistants working on secure adolescent mental health wards in an independent hospital during 2014. Method: Fifteen sets of data were collected. Ten participants completed diary entries and five participants were also interviewed allowing for triangulation. Data were analysed using Interpretive Phenomenological Analysis. Findings: The findings illustrated how inpatient mental healthcare is a unique and distinctive area of nursing, where disturbing behaviour is often normalized and detached from the outside world. Healthcare assistants often experienced tension between their personal moral code which orientate them towards empathy and support and the emotional detachment and control expected by the organization, contributing to burnout and moral distress. Conclusions: This study yielded insights into mental health nursing and specifically the phenomenon of moral distress. Given the ever‐increasing demand for healthcare professionals, the effects of moral distress on both the lives of healthcare assistants and patient care, merits further study
The only way out is the only way in : Douglas Gordon ; [contains writings by Margaret Morgan, as well as Juliana Engberg and Hannah Mathews] by Douglas Gordon( Book )
in English and held by 1 library worldwide
Douglas Gordon appropriates images from popular culture and other sources to create his signature videos and photographic installations. He first came to prominence in 1993 with the work 24 Hour Psycho, a slowed down version of Alfred Hitchcock's iconic film, and since then he has been at the forefront of contemporary practice worldwide
Seeing voices ( Book )
1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 library worldwide
'Dropped from the system': the experiences and challenges of long‐term breast cancer survivors ( file )
1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 library worldwide
Abstract: Aims: The aim of this study was to explore breast cancer patients' experiences during survivorship. Particular attention is given to the role of specialist breast care nurses in supporting women throughout this phase. Background: There is a relative lack of research involving long‐term breast cancer survivors. Yet, many survivors experience substantial psychosocial and iatrogenic harms created by diagnosis, symptoms of disease and treatment. A more comprehensive understanding may assist in supporting the needs of breast cancer survivors. Design: An exploratory qualitative approach was used to collect data on breast cancer survivors' experiences during 2013. Methods: Semi‐structured interview data were collected from seven British women aged 38–80 years exploring the support received during survivorship. Data were analysed using Interpretive Phenomenological Analysis. Findings: Breast cancer survivors perceived a systemic absence in support from oncology teams and rapid deterioration of support from personal support networks. Despite this, survivors were able to find benefits from the cancer experience. This allowed for adjustment and enabled patients to assume a new identity as a breast cancer survivor. We recommend specialist breast care nurses would be suitably placed to provide extended support allowing for a salient transition from treatment to survivorship. Conclusion: This study yields insights into breast cancer survivorship and specifically the role of specialist breast care nurses. Given the growing cohort of breast cancer survivors and the increased importance on promoting and supporting optimal psychosocial adjustment, we advise the cost‐effectiveness of providing continuing nursing support and the mode of administration requires further research
Meeting the Early Learning Challenge: Supporting English LanguageLearners by Hannah Matthews( Book )
1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 0 libraries worldwide
The Race to The Top-Early Learning Challenge (rtt-elc) is designed to improve the quality of early learning and development and close the achievement gap for children with high needs. The Departments of Education and Health and Human Services define high needs to include children who are English learners, often referred to as English Language Learners (ELLs) or Dual Language Learners (DLLs). The Early Learning Challenge is an opportunity for states to direct their attention to the needs of this group of children who are often overlooked in policy conversations. The challenge for states in addressing the needs of ELLs in the Early Learning Challenge rests on gaps in research on the most effective early education practices for young ELLs and the current state of early care and education standards and policies related to ELLs. Still, strategies for how to most effectively reach and serve ELLs in quality early education exist and can be implemented. This paper presents strategies for creating and implementing a high quality rtt-elc plan that includes ELLs by addressing the following topics: (1) Data on ELLs; (2) Developmentally, Linguistically and Culturally Appropriate Standards; (3) Appropriate Assessments for ELLs; (4) Professional Development and Workforce Competencies and Knowledge for Working with ELLs; and (5) Access to High Quality Programs for ELLs. (Contains 12 endnotes.)
Missed opportunities : the possibilities and challenges of funding high-quality preschool through Title I of the No Child Left Behind act by Danielle Ewen( Book )
1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 0 libraries worldwide
Early education programs and children of immigrants : learning each other's language by Hannah Matthews( file )
1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 0 libraries worldwide
Children from immigrant families are the fastest growing group of children in the United States. High-quality child care and early education opportunities will be critical to these children's success in school and in life. Yet, the early experiences of children in immigrant families are as diverse and varied as immigrant families themselves. While many immigrant families face numerous barriers to accessing high-quality child care and early education for their young children, these barriers are not insurmountable. The paper discusses state and local solutions to improving access for immigrant families and specific strategies and collaborations among providers, policymakers, and immigrant-serving organizations
A Count for Quality: Child Care Center Directors on Rating andImprovement Systems by Karen Schulman( Book )
1 edition published in 2012 in English and held by 0 libraries worldwide
Quality Rating and Improvement Systems (QRIS)--a strategy to improve families' access to high-quality child care--assess the quality of child care programs, offer incentives and assistance to programs to improve their ratings, and give information to parents about the quality of child care. These systems are operating in a growing number of states--22 states had statewide qris and four additional states had qris in one or more of their communities as of 2010. Given that qris are used in a growing number of states and communities, it is helpful to examine the range of approaches these states and communities are taking in designing and implementing qris. It is also important to examine the opportunities and barriers for qris in achieving the goals of improving the quality of child care and increasing access to high-quality child care for families, particularly for the most vulnerable families. Qris can be a tool for improving the quality of care accessed by low-income families who cannot afford high-quality care on their own. To gain more insight into different strategies for shaping and implementing qris, the Center for Law and Social Policy (clasp) and the National Women's Law Center (nwlc) interviewed 48 child care center directors from nine states about their experiences with qris. The directors offered valuable perspectives on what is working in their qris and how the systems could be improved. The directors' observations indicate that qris work best when they help child care providers improve quality on an ongoing basis by providing financial, mentoring, and other support and when they effectively align with other high-quality early childhood and after-school systems. To that end, nwlc and clasp recommend that state and local policy makers: (1) Set quality rating standards that appropriately reflect elements essential to the quality of care; (2) Establish a quality assessment process that is reliable and responsive; (3) Provide sufficient, sustained incentives and support for improving quality; (4) Design qris to meet the needs of all children; (5) Educate parents about qris and high-quality care; and (6) Align qris with other high-quality programs and components within the early childhood system. (Contains 45 endnotes.) [Additional funding was provided by Early Care and Education Consortium, New Directions Foundation, and Service Employees International Union.]
 
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Languages
English (17)
Welsh (5)
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