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Strick van Linschoten, Alex

Overview
Works: 8 works in 42 publications in 1 language and 1,475 library holdings
Genres: Biography  History  Poetry 
Roles: Editor, Author of introduction
Classifications: DS371.33.Z34, 958.1047
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about Alex Strick van Linschoten
Publications by Alex Strick van Linschoten
Most widely held works by Alex Strick van Linschoten
My life with the Taliban by ʻAbd al-Salām Z̤aʻīf( Book )
13 editions published between 2010 and 2011 in English and held by 821 libraries worldwide
"My Life with the Taliban is the autobiography of Abdul Salam Zaeef, a former senior member of Afghanistan's Taliban and a principal actor in its domestic and foreign affairs. Translated for the first time from the Pashto, Zaeef's words share more than a personal history of an unusual life. They supply a counternarrative to standard accounts of Afghanistan since 1979. Zaeef shares his experiences as a poor youth in rural Kandahar. Both his parents died when he was young, and Russia's invasion in 1979 forced Zaeef to flee to Pakistan. In 1983, Zaeef joined the jihad against the Soviets, fighting alongside several major figures of the anti-Soviet resistance, including current Taliban leader Mullah Mohammad Omar. After the war, he returned to his quiet life in Helmand, but factional conflicts soon broke out, and Zaeef, disgusted by the ensuing lawlessness, joined with other former mujahidin to form the Taliban, which assumed power in 1994. Zaeef recounts his time with the organization, first as a civil servant and then as a minister who negotiated with foreign oil companies and Ahmed Shah Massoud, the leader of the Afghani resistance. Zaeef served as ambassador to Pakistan at the time of 9/11, and his testimony sheds light on the "phoney war" that preceded the U.S.-led intervention. In 2002, Zaeef was delivered to the American forces operating in Pakistan and spent four and a half years in prison, including several years in Guantanamo, before being released without trial or charge. His reflections offer a privileged look at the communities that form the bedrock of the Taliban and the forces that motivate men like Zaeef to fight. They also provide an illuminating perspective on life in Guantanamo"--Jacket
Poetry of the Taliban by Alex Strick van Linschoten( Book )
8 editions published between 2011 and 2012 in English and held by 296 libraries worldwide
While much has been written about the Taliban's military tactics, media strategy and harsh treatment of women, the cultural and sometimes less overtly political representation of their identity, the Taliban's other face, is often overlooked. Most Taliban fighters are Pashtuns, a people who cherish their vibrant poetic tradition, closely associated with that of song. The poems in this collection are meant to be recited and sung; and this is the manner in which they are enjoyed by the wider Pashtun public today. For the Taliban today, these poems, or ghazals, have a resonance back to the 1980s war against the Soviets, when similar rhetorical styles, poetic formulae and tricks with metre inspired mujahideen combatants and non-combatants alike. The poetry presented here includes 'classics' of the genre from the 1980s and 1990s as well as a selection from the odes and ghazals of today's conflict
An enemy we created : the myth of the Taliban-al Qaeda merger in Afghanistan by Alex Strick van Linschoten( Book )
6 editions published between 2012 and 2014 in English and held by 249 libraries worldwide
To this day the belief is widespread that the Taliban and al-Qaeda are in many respects synonymous, that their ideology and objectives are closely intertwined and that they have made common cause against the West for decades. Such opinions have been stridently supported by politicians, media pundits and senior military figures, yet they have hardly ever been scrutinized or tested empirically. This is all the more surprising given that the West's present entanglement in Afghanistan is commonly predicated on the need to defeat the Taliban in order to forestall further terrorist attacks worldwide. There is thus an urgent need to re-examine the known facts of the Taliban-al Qaeda relationship and to tell the story of the Taliban's encounter with internationalist militant Islamism. This book responds to the overheated rhetoric that sustains a one-sided interpretation of the alleged merger between the two groups as well as the policy implications for Afghanistan that flowed in the wake of its acceptance by Western governments and their militaries. The relationship between the two groups and the individuals who established them is undeniably complex, and has remained so for many years. Links between the Taliban and al-Qaeda were retained in the face of a shared enemy following the invasion of Afghanistan after the September 11 attacks, an adversary that was selected by al-Qaeda rather than by the Taliban, and which led the latter to become entangled in a war that was not of its choosing. This book is the first to examine in detail the relationship from the Taliban perspective based on Arabic, Dari, and Pashtu sources, drawing on the authors' many years experience in southern Afghanistan, the Taliban's heartland. The authors also interviewed Taliban decision-makers, field commanders and ordinary fighters while immersing themselves in Kandahar society. Their forensic examination of the evolution of the two groups allows the background and historical context that informed their respective ideologies to come to the fore. The story of those individuals who were to become their key decision-makers, and the relationships among all those involved, from the mid-1990s onwards, reveal how complex the interactions were between the Taliban and al-Qaeda and how they frequently diverged rather than converged. This book concludes that there is room to engage the Taliban on the issues of renouncing al-Qaeda and guaranteeing that Afghanistan will deny sanctuary to international terrorists. Yet the insurgency is changing, and it could soon be too late to find a political solution. The authors contend that certain aspects of the campaign in Afghanistan, especially night raids and attempts to fragment and decapitate the Taliban, are transforming the resistance, creating more opportunities for al-Qaeda and helping it to attain its objectives
An enemy we created : the myth of the Taliban-Al Qaeda merger in Afghanistan, 1970-2010 by Alex Strick van Linschoten( Book )
7 editions published between 2012 and 2014 in English and held by 95 libraries worldwide
An enemy we created : The myth of the Taliban by Alex Strick van Linschoten( Book )
2 editions published between 2011 and 2012 in Undetermined and English and held by 6 libraries worldwide
Separating the Taliban from al-Qaeda the core of success in Afghanistan by Alex Strick van Linschoten( Computer File )
3 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 5 libraries worldwide
Alex Strick van Linschoten and Felix Kuehn are researchers and writers based in Kandahar. They have worked in Afghanistan since 2006, focusing on the Taliban insurgency and the history of southern Afghanistan over the past four decades. This paper published by CIC, expands on the following key findings: The Taliban and al-Qaeda remain distinct groups with different goals, ideologies, and sources of recruits; there was considerable friction between them before September 11, 2001, and today that friction persists. Elements of current U.S. policy in Afghanistan, especially night raids and attempts to fragment the Taliban, are changing the insurgency, inadvertently creating opportunities for al-Qaeda to achieve its objectives and preventing the achievement of core goals of the United States and the international community. There is room to engage the Taliban on the issues of renouncing al-Qaeda and providing guarantees against the use of Afghanistan by international terrorists in a way that will achieve core U.S. goals. --Publisher description
A knock on the door 22 months of ISAF press releases by Alex Strick van Linschoten( Book )
2 editions published in 2011 in English and held by 2 libraries worldwide
Separating the Taliban from al-Qaeda the core of success in Afghanistan ; a CIC study by Alex Strick van Linschoten( Computer File )
1 edition published in 2011 in Undetermined and held by 1 library worldwide
 
Alternative Names
Linschoten, Alex Strick van.
Van Linschoten, Alex Strick.
Languages
English (40)
Covers
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