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Yemtsov, Ruslan

Overview
Works: 43 works in 136 publications in 2 languages and 1,577 library holdings
Roles: Author
Classifications: HC244.Z9, 339.460947
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about Ruslan Yemtsov
Publications by Ruslan Yemtsov
Most widely held works by Ruslan Yemtsov
Growth, Poverty, and Inequality Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union by Asad Alam( file )
11 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 687 libraries worldwide
"While the countries of Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union have made significant progress in reducing poverty during 1998-2003, poverty and vulnerability remain significant problems. More than 60 million are poor and more than 150 million are vulnerable. Most of the poor are the working poor. Many others face deprivations in terms of access and quality of public services. Regional inequalities both between and within countries are large. The highest levels of absolute poverty are found in the poor countries of Central Asia and the South Caucasus, but most of the region's poor and vulnerable are in middle income countries."
Armenia Restructuring to Sustain Universal General Education by Gillian Perkins( file )
18 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 287 libraries worldwide
Annotation
Household strategies for coping with poverty and social exclusion in post-crisis Russia by Michael Lokshin( file )
8 editions published in 2001 in English and Undetermined and held by 87 libraries worldwide
For Russian households coping with economic hardship in the wake of the recent financial crisis, the choice of survival strategy has strongly depended on their human capital. The higher a household's level of human capital, the more likely it is to choose an active strategy
Russian unemployment : its magnitude, characteristics, and regional dimensions by Simon Commander( Book )
8 editions published between 1995 and 1999 in English and Undetermined and held by 84 libraries worldwide
Evaluating the impact of infrastructure rehabilitation projects on household welfare in rural Georgia by Michael Lokshin( file )
9 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 54 libraries worldwide
Who bears the cost of Russia's military draft? by Michael Lokshin( file )
5 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 52 libraries worldwide
"The authors use data from a large nationally representative survey in Russia to analyze the distributional and welfare implications of draft avoidance as a common response to Russia's highly unpopular conscription system. They develop a simple theoretical model that describes household compliance decisions with respect to enlistment. The authors use several econometric techniques to estimate the effect of various household characteristics on the probability of serving in the army and the implications for household income. Their results indicate that the burden of conscription falls disproportionately on the poor. Poor, rural households, with a low level of education, are more likely to have sons who are enlisted than urban, wealthy, and better-educated families. The losses incurred by the poor are disproportionately large and exceed the statutory rates of personal income taxes. "--World Bank web site
Who bears the cost of Russia's military draft? by Michael Lokshin( file )
2 editions published in 2005 in Undetermined and English and held by 32 libraries worldwide
"The authors use data from a large nationally representative survey in Russia to analyze the distributional and welfare implications of draft avoidance as a common response to Russia's highly unpopular conscription system. They develop a simple theoretical model that describes household compliance decisions with respect to enlistment. The authors use several econometric techniques to estimate the effect of various household characteristics on the probability of serving in the army and the implications for household income. Their results indicate that the burden of conscription falls disproportionately on the poor. Poor, rural households, with a low level of education, are more likely to have sons who are enlisted than urban, wealthy, and better-educated families. The losses incurred by the poor are disproportionately large and exceed the statutory rates of personal income taxes. "--World Bank web site
Armenia restructuring to sustain universal general education by Gillian Perkins( file )
1 edition published in 2001 in English and held by 29 libraries worldwide
Evaluating the impact of infrastructure rehabilitation projects on household welfare in rural Georgia by Ruslan Yemtsov( file )
1 edition published in 2003 in English and held by 29 libraries worldwide
Increasing Inequality In Transition Economies Is There More To Come? by Pradeep Mitra( Book )
5 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 27 libraries worldwide
This paper decomposes changes in inequality, which has in general been increasing in the transition economies of Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union, both by income source and socio-economic group, with a view to understanding the determinants of inequality and assessing how it might evolve in the future. The empirical analysis relies on a set of inequality statistics that, unlike "official data", are consistent and comparable across countries and are based on primary records from household surveys recently put together for the World Bank study "Growth, Poverty and Inequality in Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union: 1998-2003" [World Bank (2005b)]. The increase in inequality in transition, as predicted by a number of theoretical models, in practice differed substantially across countries, with the size and speed of its evolution depending on the relative importance of its key determinants, viz., changes in the wage distribution, employment, entrepreneurial incomes and social safety nets. Its evolution was also influenced by policy. This diversity of outcomes is exemplified on the one hand for Central Europe by Poland, where the increase in inequality has been steady but gradual and reflects, inter alia, larger changes in employment and compensating adjustments in social safety nets and, on the other for the Commonwealth of Independent States by Russia, where an explosive overshooting of inequality peaked in the mid-1990s before being moderated through the extinguishing of wage arrears during its post-1998 recovery. The paper argues that the process of transition to a market economy is not complete and that further evolution of inequality will depend both on (i) transition-related factors, such as the evolution of the education premium, a bias in the investment climate against new private sector firms which are important vehicles of job creation and regional impediments to mobility of goods and labor, as well as increasingly (ii) other factors, such as technological change and globalization. The paper also contrasts key features of inequality in Russia in the context of other transition economies with trends in inequality observed in China where rapid economic growth has been accompanied by a steep increase in inequality. It argues that the latter's experience is, to a large extent, a developmental, rather than a transition-related phenomenon deriving from the rural-urban divide and is, therefore, of limited relevance for predicting changes in inequality in Russia
Unemployment and labor market dynamics in Russia by Simon Commander( Book )
5 editions published in 1993 in English and held by 25 libraries worldwide
Wage and employment decisions in the Russian economy : an analysis of developments in 1992 by Simon Commander( Book )
3 editions published in 1993 in English and held by 23 libraries worldwide
Quo vadis? : inequality and poverty dynamics across Russian regions by Ruslan Yemtsov( Book )
6 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 18 libraries worldwide
Bezrabotit︠s︡a, strukturnai︠a︡ perestroĭka ėkonomiki i rynok truda v Vostochnoĭ Evrope i Rossii ( Book )
2 editions published in 1995 in Russian and held by 16 libraries worldwide
Labor markets, inequality and poverty in Georgia by Ruslan Yemtsov( Book )
7 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 15 libraries worldwide
The labor market is the main channel through which economic growth affects poverty. This paper is the first empirical account of main channels through which the growth in transition period has affected labor market and living standards in Georgia. It is based on both the official aggregate statistics and data from a representative household survey fielded in 1996-1997. The paper finds that in Georgia the labor market has shown outstanding flexibility during a period of severe political and economic turmoil in 1992-1995. Despite the catastrophic fall in GDP employment contracted only marginally. This flexibility has been achieved mainly through the informalization of employment, and through the reallocation of labor towards small-scale agriculture. Informalization has dampened the impact of the crisis and served to protect the poor, stabilizing the poverty rate at the politically and socially acceptable level (around 15% of the population). However, the informalization limited the impact of market forces favoring human capital accumulation on the formation of earnings. Today, a large and growing fraction of the Georgian labor force relies on self-employment as the primary means to earn an income. For some, this is an avenue for earnings mobility and growth; for the majority, however, selfemployment remains constrained to low-productivity agricultural or trading activities, with little earnings stability and little potential for long term earnings growth. Prospects for the future hinge critically on the economy's ability to generate new private formal employment, and to reallocate labor away from these low-productivity activities into higher value added sectors
How can safety nets contribute to economic growth? by Harold Alderman( file )
2 editions published in 2013 in Undetermined and English and held by 15 libraries worldwide
The paper provides an up-to date and selective review of the literature on how social safety nets contribute to growth. The evidence is carefully chosen to show how safety nets have the potential to overcome constraints on growth linked to market failures, and is organized into 4 distinct pathways: i) encouraging asset accumulation by changing incentives and by addressing imperfections in financial markets caused by constraints in obtaining credit, and from information asymmetries; overcoming such failures helps households to invest into their human capital or productive assets; ii) failures in insurance markets especially in low income setting; safety nets are assisting in managing risk both ex post and ex ante; iii) safety nets are overcoming failure to create assets and other local economy complementary factors to household-level investments; iv) safety nets are shown to relax political constraints on policy. Safety nets have a dual objective of directly alleviating poverty through transfers to the poor and of triggering higher growth for the poor. However, the trade-off between the dual objectives of equity and growth is not eliminated by the potential for productive safety nets; this remains critical for designing social policies
Bosnia And Herzegovina 2001-2004 : Enterprise Restructuring, Labor Market Transitions And Poverty by Erwin Tiongson( file )
4 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 14 libraries worldwide
This paper takes stock of labor market developments in Bosnia and Herzegovina over the period 2001-2004, using the panel Living Standards Measurement Study/Living in Bosnia and Herzegovina survey. The analysis estimates a multinomial logit model of labor market transitions by state of origin (employment, unemployment, and inactivity) following the specification of widely used models of transition probabilities, and analyzes the impact of standard covariates. The results provide strong evidence that there are indeed significant differences in labor market transitions by gender, age, education, and geographic location. Using the panel structure of the multi-topic survey data, the authors find that these transitions are related to welfare dynamics, with welfare levels evolving differently for various groups depending on their labor market trajectories. The findings show that current labor market trends reflecting women's movement out of labor markets and laid-off male workers accepting informal sector jobs characterized by low productivity will lead to adverse social outcomes. These outcomes could be averted if the planned enterprise reform program creates a more favorable business environment and leads to faster restructuring and growth of firms
Inequality and income distribution in Georgia by Ruslan Yemtsov( Book )
6 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 13 libraries worldwide
In the period of macroeconomic crisis in Georgia between 1991 and1994 the combination of hyperinflation, catastrophic output drop and weak governance, have led to a sharp rise in inequality among households. Sharp inequities have arisen not only between households, but also between regions. This paper gives a picture of the main channels of redistribution and of the main driving forces of income inequality in Georgia, as it emerges from the analysis of the first representative survey of incomes and expenditures of Georgian households in 1996-1997. The paper finds that the level of inequality for money income in Georgia is comparable to highest inequality countries of Latin America (Gini equals 0.6). However, given the degree of informalization and demonetization of the economy, measuring only reported monetary incomes gives a somewhat misleading picture of the living standards. The paper argues that consumption is a much better indicator of welfare, especially in the Georgian context and explores the relationship between income and consumption in the Georgian context. Using consumption, we get the picture that is marked by very clear, though, not as striking inequalities (Gini coefficient of 0.36). Growth has not yet had a strong impact on consumption inequality per se, but we find evidence that during 1996-97 consumption increased at almost all levels of the distribution. During the same period, there was significant income mobility, except for those at the very bottom or the very top of the income distribution. For the latter, economic success appears to be closely associated with labor market status, ownership of productive assets and resulting earnings opportunities. Georgian economy is generating a system of much inequality. The key share of inequality can be attributed to informal incomes (using the decomposition analysis as proposed by Shorrocks). State transfers being reduced to minimum levels do exercise only a slight positive impact on the overall inequality outcomes
Social Protection, Poverty and the Post-2015 Agenda by Ariel Fiszbein( Book )
3 editions published in 2013 in English and Undetermined and held by 13 libraries worldwide
Social protection is absent from the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), and only recently has gained some prominence in the post-2015 discourse. In the past quarter century, however, rising inequality has often accompanied economic growth. At the same time, the growing importance of risk and vulnerability on the wellbeing of the poor has been recognized. Further, there is now a consensus on adopting more ambitious goals on poverty reduction. Defining social protection as a collection of programs that address risk, vulnerability, inequality and poverty through a system of transfers in cash or in kind, this paper argues that social protection needs to be on the post-2015 agenda as a key element of the discourse. It provides an empirical overview of social protection around the world based on the World Bank's Atlas of Social Protection: Indicators of Resilience and Equity (ASPIRE) data set. Focusing on the goal of ending poverty, the paper estimates that social protection programs are currently preventing 150 million people from falling into poverty. Based on the data set, the paper develops, tentatively and for discussion, a set of candidate goals, indicators and targets for the acceleration of poverty reduction through social protection. The authors ask what it would take for social protection programs to contribute to halving the poverty gap in a country. They show that if all countries could achieve the actual poverty reduction efficiency already observed in the top quartile of countries, then 70 percent of the countries in the sample could achieve this goal. However, for 30 percent of the countries, even reaching the top quartile on efficiency will not be enough-for these countries, the issue is one of budgetary adequacy
Was growth in Egypt between 2005 and 2008 pro-poor? From static to dynamic poverty profile by Daniela Marotta( file )
1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 12 libraries worldwide
This paper presents a detailed picture of how sustained growth in Egypt over 2005-2008 affected different groups both above and below the poverty line. This analysis, based on the Household Income, Expenditure and Consumption Panel Survey conducted by Egypt's national statistical agency, compares the changes in the static poverty profiles (based on growth incidence curves on a cross-section of data) with poverty dynamics (relying on panel data, growth incidence curves and transition matrices). The two approaches yield contrasting results: the longitudinal analysis reveals that growth benefited the poor while the cross-sectional analysis shows that the rich benefitted even more. The paper also shows the importance of going beyond averages to look at the trajectories of individual households. Panel data analysis shows that the welfare of the average poor household increased by almost 10 percent per year between 2005 and 2008, enough to move out of poverty. Conversely however, many initially non-poor households were exposed to poverty. As a matter of fact, only 45 percent of the population in Egypt remained consistently out of (near-) poverty throughout the period, while the remaining 55 percent of Egyptians experienced at least one (near-) poverty episode. This high mobility is not a statistical artefact: it reflects the actual process of growth. Taking high vulnerability into account is essential when designing policies to protect the poor and to ensure that growth is really inclusive
 
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Alternative Names
Emcov, R.
Emcov, Ruslan
Emt︠s︡ov, R.
Emt︠s︡ov, R. (Ruslan)
Emt︠s︡ov, Ruslan
Jemcov, Ruslan 1965-
Yemtsov, Ruslan
Yemtsov, Ruslan 1965-
Yemtsov, Ruslan G. 1965-
Languages
English (100)
Russian (2)
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