skip to content

Lanjouw, Peter

Overview
Works: 125 works in 322 publications in 1 language and 2,873 library holdings
Genres: History 
Roles: Author, Editor, Honoree
Classifications: HG3881.5.W57, 338.9542
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about Peter Lanjouw
Publications by Peter Lanjouw
Most widely held works by Peter Lanjouw
Constructing an indicator of consumption for the analysis of poverty : principles and illustrations with reference to Ecuador by Jesko Hentschel( Book )
17 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 129 libraries worldwide
Economic development in Palanpur over five decades by Peter Lanjouw( Book )
20 editions published between 1998 and 2004 in English and held by 123 libraries worldwide
This is an account of economic development in Palanpur, a village in rural north India, based on surveys of the village over the period 1957 to 1993. The analysis focuses on the reasons behind its uneven progress, tying in background issues
Rural nonfarm employment : a survey by Jean Olson Lanjouw( Book )
9 editions published in 1995 in English and Undetermined and held by 77 libraries worldwide
Household welfare measurement and the pricing of basic services by Jesko Hentschel( file )
9 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 69 libraries worldwide
A measured approach to ending poverty and boosting shared prosperity : concepts, data, and the twin goals by World Bank( Book )
4 editions published between 2014 and 2015 in English and held by 45 libraries worldwide
In 2013, the World Bank Group adopted two new goals to guide its work: ending extreme poverty and boosting shared prosperity. More specifically, the goals are to reduce extreme poverty in the world to less than 3 percent by 2030, and to foster income growth of the bottom 40 percent of the population in each country. While poverty reduction has been a mainstay of the World Bank's mission for decades, the Bank has now set a specific goal and timetable, and for the first time, the Bank has explicitly included a goal linked to ensuring that growth is shared by all. The discussion until now has centered primarily on articulating the new goals. This report, the latest in World Bank's Policy Research Report series, goes beyond that and lays out their conceptual underpinnings, discusses their relative strengths and weaknesses by contrasting them with alternative indicators, and proposes empirical approaches and requirements to track progress towards the goals. The report makes clear that the challenges posed by the World Bank Group's new stance extend not just to the pursuit of these goals but, indeed, to their very definition and empirical content. The report also argues that an improved data infrastructure, consisting of many elements including the collection of more and better survey data, is critical to ensure that progress towards these goals can be measured, and policies to help achieve them can be identified and prioritized
Poverty and economic transition how do changes in economies of scale affect poverty rates of different households? by Peter Lanjouw( file )
6 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 43 libraries worldwide
Poverty comparisons with non-compatible data : theory and illustrations by Jean Olson Lanjouw( Book )
8 editions published in 1997 in English and held by 39 libraries worldwide
How Good A Map ? Putting Small Area Estimation To The Test by Gabriel Demombynes( file )
4 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 37 libraries worldwide
The authors examine the performance of small area welfare estimation. The method combines census and survey data to produce spatially disaggregated poverty and inequality estimates. To test the method, they compare predicted welfare indicators for a set of target populations with their true values. They construct target populations using actual data from a census of households in a set of rural Mexican communities. They examine estimates along three criteria: accuracy of confidence intervals, bias, and correlation with true values. The authors find that while point estimates are very stable, the precision of the estimates varies with alternative simulation methods. While the original approach of numerical gradient estimation yields standard errors that seem appropriate, some computationally less-intensive simulation procedures yield confidence intervals that are slightly too narrow. The precision of estimates is shown to diminish markedly if unobserved location effects at the village level are not well captured in underlying consumption models. With well specified models there is only slight evidence of bias, but the authors show that bias increases if underlying models fail to capture latent location effects. Correlations between estimated and true welfare at the local level are highest for mean expenditure and poverty measures and lower for inequality measures
Ecuador's rural nonfarm sector as a route out of poverty by Peter Lanjouw( file )
2 editions published between 1998 and 1999 in Undetermined and English and held by 36 libraries worldwide
Poverty in India during the 1990s a regional perspective by Yoko Kijima( file )
2 editions published in 2003 in Undetermined and English and held by 36 libraries worldwide
Imputed welfare estimates in regression analysis by Chris Elbers( Book )
7 editions published in 2004 in English and held by 36 libraries worldwide
Elbers, Lanjouw, and Lanjouw discuss the use of imputed data in regression analysis, in particular the use of highly disaggregated welfare indicators (from so-called "poverty maps"). They show that such indicators can be used both as explanatory variables on the right-hand side and as the phenomenon to explain on the left-hand side. The authors try out practical ways of adjusting standard errors of the regression coefficients to reflect the error introduced by using imputed, rather than actual, welfare indicators. These are illustrated by regression experiments based on data from Ecuador. For regressions with imputed variables on the left-hand side, the authors argue that essentially the same aggregate relationships would be found with either actual or imputed variables. They address the methodological question of how to interpret aggregate relationships found in such regressions. This paper--a product of the Poverty Team, Development Research Group--is part of a larger effort in the group to develop methods of welfare estimation at the micro level
Re-Interpreting Sub-Group Inequality Decompositions by Chris Elbers( file )
6 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 35 libraries worldwide
The authors propose a modification to the conventional approach of decomposing income inequality by population sub-groups. Specifically, they propose a measure that evaluates observed between-group inequality against a benchmark of maximum between-group inequality that can be attained when the number and relative sizes of groups under examination are fixed. The authors argue that such a modification can provide a complementary perspective on the question of whether a particular population breakdown is salient to an assessment of inequality in a country. As their measure normalizes between-group inequality by the number and relative sizes of groups, it is also less subject to problems of comparability across different settings. The authors show that for a large set of countries their assessment of the importance of group differences typically increases substantially on the basis of this approach. The ranking of countries (or different population groups) can also differ from that obtained using traditional decomposition methods. Finally, they observe an interesting pattern of higher levels of overall inequality in countries where their measure finds higher between-group contributions
Benefit incidence and the timing of program capture by Peter Lanjouw( Book )
8 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 34 libraries worldwide
The evolution of poverty and inequality in Indian villages by Raji Jayaraman( Book )
8 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 33 libraries worldwide
Micro-level estimation of welfare by Jean Olson Lanjouw( file )
3 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 33 libraries worldwide
The authors construct and derive the properties of estimators of welfare that take advantage of the detailed information about living standards available in small household surveys and the comprehensive coverage of a census or large sample. By combining the strengths of each, the estimators can be used at a remarkably disaggregated level. They have a clear interpretation, are mutually comparable, and can be assessed for reliability using standard statistical theory. Using data from Ecuador, the authors obtain estimates of welfare measures, some of which are quite reliable for populations as small as 15,000 households--a "town." They provide simple illustrations of their use. Such estimates open up the possibility of testing, at a more convincing intra-country level, the many recent models relating welfare distributions to growth and a variety of socioeconomic and political outcomes. This paper--a product of the Poverty Team, Development Research Group--is part of a larger effort in the group to develop tools for the analysis of poverty and income distribution
Poverty, education, and health in Indonesia : who benefits from public spending? by Peter Lanjouw( Book )
7 editions published between 2001 and 2002 in English and held by 32 libraries worldwide
Static and dynamic incidence analysis underscores the importance of Indonesia's public spending on primary health care to the poor. In education, evidence suggests that the poor are well represented in primary schooling and would benefit from increased public provisioning of secondary schooling
Ecuador's rural nonfarm sector as a route out of poverty by Peter Lanjouw( Book )
9 editions published between 1998 and 1999 in English and held by 32 libraries worldwide
March 1998 The nonagricultural rural sector represents a potentially important route out of poverty in Ecuador. Poverty declines as the share of income from nonagricultural sources rises. Nonagricultural employment and earnings are positively associated with better education and infrastructure access. Poverty could be expected to fall substantially with expansion in nonfarm sectors such as construction, transport, commerce, and services. Lanjouw analyzes a recent household survey for Ecuador to assess the role of the nonagricultural rural sector in reducing poverty. That sector accounts for roughly 40 percent of rural incomes in Ecuador, three-fourths of which comes from nonagricultural enterprises as opposed to wage labor. The sector provides employment to nearly 40 percent of men and 50 percent of economically active women. The nonagricultural rural sector represents a potentially important route out of poverty: Poverty declines as the share of income from nonagricultural sources rises. Nonagricultural employment and earnings are positively associated with higher education levels and better access to infrastructure services. Although women are more likely than men to be employed in this sector, their earnings for given education levels and other household characteristics are significantly lower. All other things equal, the greatest fall in poverty could be expected from expanding employment opportunities in transport, commerce-related activities, and such services as administration and the hotel and restaurant trade. This paper-a product of the Development Research Group-is part of a larger effort in the group to study the role of the nonfarm sector in the rural economy. The author may be contacted at planjouw@worldbank.org
Poverty and the economic transition : how do changes in economies of scale affect poverty rates for different households? by Peter Lanjouw( Book )
4 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 26 libraries worldwide
Poverty in India during the 1990s : a regional perspective by Yoko Kijima( Book )
8 editions published between 1997 and 2003 in English and held by 26 libraries worldwide
Kijima and Lanjouw provide estimates of poverty at the regional level in India spanning the 1990s. Such estimates have not been previously available due to concerns regarding noncomparability of the 1993-94 and 1999-2000 National Sample Survey Organization (NSSO) household survey data. They implement an adjustment procedure to restore comparability based on a methodology developed by Elbers and others (2003). The results indicate a less rapid decline of poverty at the all-India level than has been suggested by Deaton and Drèze (2002) based on a related adjustment methodology. The authors attempt to uncover the source of disagreement across these procedures by probing a number of their underlying assumptions. This paper--a product of the Poverty Team, Development Research Group--is part of a larger effort in the group to analyze poverty in India
Gender and the allocation of adult time : evidence from the Peru LSMS panel data by Nadeem Ilahi( Book )
3 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 25 libraries worldwide
Analysis of time use data for Peru in 1994 and 1997 shows that women work up to a fifth more than men do and that women in poor households work more than those in rich ones, while there is no difference for men
 
moreShow More Titles
fewerShow Fewer Titles
Languages
English (141)
Covers
Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.