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University of Nottingham Centre for Research in Economic Development and International Trade

Overview
Works: 250 works in 335 publications in 2 languages and 1,095 library holdings
Genres: Conference papers and proceedings 
Roles: Other
Classifications: HF3496.5, 382.094
Publication Timeline
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Publications about University of Nottingham
Publications by University of Nottingham
Most widely held works about University of Nottingham
 
Most widely held works by University of Nottingham
The reform of the common agricultural policy ( Book )
2 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 40 libraries worldwide
Intra-industry trade and adjustment : the European experience ( Book )
4 editions published between 1998 and 1999 in English and held by 23 libraries worldwide
Are there gender-separate human capital effects on growth? : a review of the recent empirical literature by Paula K Lorgelly( Book )
2 editions published in 2000 in English and held by 9 libraries worldwide
This paper provides a review of the recent empirical growth literature which includes human capital as a determinant of economic growth; special attention is given to the studies which investigate gender-separate human capital effects. While there is a general consensus regarding the role of (gender-neutral) human capital in the growth process - increasing educational attainment and health status increases labour productivity resulting in greater economic growth - there is a great deal of contradictory evidence regarding the effect of gender-separate human capital on economic growth. For example, in their seminal article, Barro and Lee (1994) find that, while growth is positively related to male education, it is negatively related to female education; Caselli, Esquivel and Lefort (1996), however, find the opposite, while Birdsall, Ross and Sabot (1997) report no significant difference between the genders. This article attempts to appraise and critique this confusing literature, and in the process, resolve many of the existing ambiguities
Does financial development mitigate negative effects of policy uncertainty on economic growth? by Robert Lensink( Book )
2 editions published in 2000 in English and held by 9 libraries worldwide
Determinants of exports and investment of manufacturing firms in Tanzania by Louise Grenier( Book )
2 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 8 libraries worldwide
Since the mid-1980s Tanzania has implemented a number of trade and fiscal policy reforms that were partly intended to encourage increased export activity by manufacturing firms. Macroeconomic data suggest that there has been little response. To understand this lack of response we need to increase our understanding of the features of manufacturing exporters in Tanzania. This paper is a first attempt, by presenting the findings from a survey of 83 firms. Large firms are more likely to export than other firms , and more large firms sustain their investments than smaller firms. We also find, independent of this relationship to size, that firms that sustain investment are more likely to export than those which do not sustain investment. One distinction between our findings and other studies is that parastatals, including firms with some government ownership, tend to be larger and are more likely to export and sustain investments than non- parastatals. Subscription by shareholders and personal savings are the two main sources of start-up capital, while company earnings are how most investments are financed. The findings are consistent with the view limited access to bank financing has been a major constraint to manufacturing, especially exporting
Do large employers pay more in Developing Countries? : the case of five African Countries by Eric Strobl( Book )
3 editions published between 2001 and 2002 in English and held by 8 libraries worldwide
Using comparable data sets for five African countries we estimate, and evaluate possible explanations for, the employer size wage effect across these. Our results indicate, just as has been generally found for other developing and developed nations, that apart from observable worker characteristics most potential theories cannot explain very much of the wage premium received in larger firms. Moreover, we find that the employer size wage effect does not differ greatly across the five African countries. Like other developing nations it is, however, larger than that found in the industrialised world, and, unlike the industrialised world, larger for white than blue collar workers. Additionally, data for one of the African countries in conjunction with other evidence suggests that this may in part be because skill biased technology affects the firm size wage distribution across skill groups in developing countries more
Problems with pooling in panel data analysis for developing countries : the case of aid and trade relationships by Tim Lloyd( Book )
2 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 8 libraries worldwide
It is common practice in empirical development macroeconomics to use cross-country samples for econometric analyses. One issue that is rarely addressed in this literature is the appropriateness of pooling when panels are used. In particular, does it matter to the results if the countries exhibit different time series properties in respect of the relationship being observed? This is the issue addressed in this paper, taking the example of the "aid and trade" relationship. We also address the following questions: (a) Is there any support for the assertion that donors use aid to perpetuate their trade with recipients? (b) How important is trade in influencing aid allocation decisions of donors? The principal result is that pooling countries with different underlying time series properties (different inherent causality) is inappropriate and gives misleading results. In other words large samples are not necessarily the best samples. Using appropriate samples, we find no evidence that tied aid increases trade, although donors providing a higher share of aid tend to trade more with the recipient. In terms of aid allocation, donors appear to be concerned with relative aid and trade shares rather than absolute volumes
Foreign ownership and wages : evidence from five African countries by Dirk Willem te Velde( Book )
2 editions published in 2001 in English and held by 8 libraries worldwide
Do agricultural outputs of autarkic peasants affect their health and nutrition? : evidence from Rwanda by Christophe Muller( Book )
2 editions published in 2000 in English and held by 8 libraries worldwide
In rural areas of LDCs, because of market imperfections, the health and nutritional status of peasants may directly depend on the production levels of specific agricultural goods rather than solely on income levels. We analyse the responses of health and nutritional status of autarkic agricultural households in Rwanda, with respect to differences in socio-demographic characteristics and levels of the main agricultural outputs and inputs. The estimates account for fixed cluster-effects and the sampling scheme. The various food outputs are generally found to have a positive influence on health and nutrition, whereas the production of traditional beers has a negative impact. Thus, a policy based on incentives for substituting cultures may improve peasants' health and nutrition
The measurement of poverty with geographical and intertemporal price dispersion by Christophe Muller( Book )
4 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 8 libraries worldwide
Little attention has been devoted to the effects of price dispersion at local and seasonal levels on the measurement of living standards in LDCs. In particular, it is not known if a substantial share of welfare or poverty is the consequence of price differences rather than of differences in living standards across households and seasons. Using data from Rwanda, we show that the change in mean living standard due to price deflation is moderate although significant in every quarter. By contrast, the change in poverty can be considerable, for chronic as well as transient or seasonal poverty indicators. The deflation generally yields a larger transient seasonal share of annual poverty. The choice of the poverty line or the season considered are more influential than the choice of the kernel function of axiomatically sound poverty indices. Moreover, the composition of the population of the poor can be substantially modified by the deflation. Finally, the deflation using regional price indices instead of local prices is shown to only partially correct for the geographical price dispersion, when measuring seasonal poverty
Aid and tax instability and the government budget constraint in developing countries by Norman Gemmell( Book )
2 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 8 libraries worldwide
Dynamic sectoral linkages and structural change in a developing economy by Norman Gemmell( Book )
1 edition published in 1998 in English and held by 8 libraries worldwide
The literature on the stylised facts of structural change in LDCs has been bedevilled by three problems: (i) drawing time-series inferences from cross-section results; (ii) endogeneity of the variables involved; and (iii) an inability to separate short-run from long-run effects. This paper uses time-series econometric techniques to address each of these problems - investigating linkages between agricultural, manufacturing and service GDPs (and productivity) for Malaysia. Our results suggest that expansion of manufacturing GDP, though associated with reduced agricultural output in the shortrun, was associated with agricultural expansion over the long-run. Service GDP growth on the other hand seems to be inimical to growth of agricultural GDP in both the short- and long-runs. Interestingly, both manufacturing and service GDPs appear to be (weakly) exogenous in the sense that they 'Granger-cause' changes in agricultural GDP but not vice versa. Evidence on sectoral productivity indicates that increases in manufacturing and services both impact positively on agricultural productivity in the long-run. This is consistent with neoclassical arguments suggesting that higher productivity techniques in manufacturing tend to spill over to agriculture, so encouraging convergent tendencies in sectoral productivity levels
Dolphins, turtles, mad cows and butterflies : a look at the multilateral trading system in the 21st century by Sam Laird( Book )
2 editions published in 2000 in English and held by 8 libraries worldwide
Censored quantile regressions of chronic and transient seasonal poverty in Rwanda by Christophe Muller( Book )
2 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 8 libraries worldwide
It is crucial for social policy in Less Developed Countries to identify separate correlates for transient poverty and chronic poverty at the household level because seasonal poverty substantially contributes to annual poverty. This has been attempted by estimating household equations for those poverty indicators typically by using Tobit and Probit models. However, when errors in household poverty equations are not distributed following a normal law, these models deliver biased estimates of parameters. Using quarterly data from Rwanda in 1983, we reject the normality assumption for household chronic and transient latent poverty measures and living standard variables. We treat this problem by estimating censored quantile regressions. The estimation results show that different correlates are significant for chronic poverty and for transient seasonal poverty. The effects of the main inputs (land and labour) are more important for the chronic component of poverty than for the transient one. Household location and its socio-demographic characteristics play important roles that are consistent with usual explanations of poverty. The results of censored quantile regressions and of inconsistent Tobit regressions are substantially different. However, in the case of chronic poverty the signs of the apparently significant coefficients are generally in agreement, while for transient poverty, different variables have significant effects for the two estimation methods
The WTO agenda and developing countries by Sam Laird( Book )
2 editions published in 2000 in English and held by 8 libraries worldwide
Multilateral market access negotiations in goods and services by S Laird( Book )
2 editions published in 2000 in English and held by 7 libraries worldwide
Ugandan trade policy and export performance in the 1990s by Oliver Morrissey( Book )
2 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 7 libraries worldwide
Modelling the fiscal effects of aid : an impulse response analysis for Ghana by Robert Osei( Book )
2 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 7 libraries worldwide
Competition and business confidence in manufacturing enterprises in Tanzania by Louise Grenier( Book )
2 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 7 libraries worldwide
The fragility of the evidence on inequality, trade liberalisation, growth and poverty by Jennifer Moyo( Book )
2 editions published in 2002 in English and held by 7 libraries worldwide
References p. 30-32
 
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controlled identity University of Nottingham. Department of Economics

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University of Nottingham Centre for Research in Economic Development and International Trade
University of Nottingham Department of Economics Centre for Research in Economic Development and International Trade
Languages
English (44)
German (1)
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