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Kisunko, Gregory

Overview
Works: 35 works in 123 publications in 1 language and 2,663 library holdings
Genres: Periodicals 
Roles: Author, Honoree
Classifications: HG5993, 332.67314091724
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about Gregory Kisunko
Publications by Gregory Kisunko
Most widely held works by Gregory Kisunko
How businesses see government : responses from private sector surveys in 69 countries by Aymo Brunetti( Book )
22 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 201 libraries worldwide
"This paper presents the results of a survey of almost 4,000 entrepreneurs in 69 countries who were asked to judge what constituted a major obstacle for business operations. Among the numerous findings in the report, corruption, crime and theft, and tax regulations were found to be important obstacles to doing business. OECD countries, six transition countries, and twelve developing countries were represented in the survey."
Trends in private investment in thirty developing countries by Guy Pierre Pfeffermann( Book )
12 editions published between 1989 and 1999 in English and held by 111 libraries worldwide
This is the tenth annual edition of "Trends in Private Investment in Developing Countries." To mark this event, this report includes figures for each of the countries for which data are available as well as the first country-specific results of a worldwide survey on obstacles to doing business perceived by executives in 74 countries (including several industrial countries for comparison). The first part of this report documents trends in private and public fixed investment. The second part presents country-specific results of a 1996/97 worldwide survey of business executives. The discussion focus on obstacles to doing business and their relationship to levels of private investment. A few factors emerge as being of particular importance to private investment decisions:the real exchange rate, the rule of law, predictability of judiciary systems, and the extent to which financing is available to enterprises
Institutions in transition : reliability of rules and economic performance in former socialist countries by Aymo Brunetti( Book )
12 editions published between 1997 and 1999 in English and held by 75 libraries worldwide
August 1997 The predictability of a transition economy's institutional framework may well influence the amount of foreign direct investment and economic growth the economy can expect. Building reliable institutions that support a market system is widely believed to be critical to a successful economic transition. Brunetti, Kisunko, and Weder present indicators on the predictability of the institutional framework across twenty transition economies--indicators of the predictability of rules, political stability, the security of property rights, the reliability of the judiciary, and the lack of corruption. They then investigate whether these indicators can explain differences in economic performance. The results suggest that the predictability of the institutional framework may indeed explain a large part of differences in foreign direct investment and in economic growth among transition economies. Political stability and secure property rights are particularly important to entrepreneurial confidence in the economy. This paper--a product of the Office of the Chief Economist and Senior Vice President, Development Economics--was produced as a background paper for World Development Report 1997: The Role of the State in a Changing World. The study was funded in part by the Research Support Budget under the research projects Cross-Country Indicators of Institutional Uncertainty (RPO 680-51) and Indicators of Government Quality as Perceived by the Private Sector (RPO 681-52)
Institutional obstacles to doing business region-by-region results from a worldwide survey of the private sector by Aymo Brunetti( file )
15 editions published between 1997 and 1999 in English and Undetermined and held by 69 libraries worldwide
April 1997 More than 3,600 entrepreneurs worldwide respond to a survey about problems with uncertainty in dealings with the state. Case studies and anecdotal evidence have suggested that uncertainty about policies, laws, and regulations has hampered development of the private sector in many developing countries. Brunetti, Kisunko, and Weder present results from a new cross-country survey that provides comparable data on local investors' problem in dealing with the state. The survey was conducted in 69 countries and covers more than 3,600 entrepreneurs. The questionnaire asked 25 questions about investors' perceptions about such issues as the predictability of laws and policies, the reliability of the judiciary, corruption in bureaucracies, and security of property rights. It also asked about general obstacles to doing business and the quality of state-delivered services. Brunetti, Kisunko, and Weder discuss their methodology and present many findings. Among them: * In less developed countries the majority of entrepreneurs constantly fear policy surprises and unexpected changes in rules that can seriously affect their business. Entrepreneurs in Asia have the most trust in government announcements of policy changes and changes in rules; entrepreneurs in the Commonwealth of Independent States are the most cynical about new announcements; and half of businessmen surveyed in Latin America and Central and Eastern Europe do not believe government announcements. * Entrepreneurs worldwide feel that the cost of doing business is substantially increased by theft and crime and in many developing countries the business community feels that authorities do not adequately guarantee their personal safety and do not reliably enforce their property rights. * Unreliable judiciaries are perceived as major problems in many developing countries. This applies in particular to the Commonwealth of Independent States and to Latin American countries. * Entrepreneurs in industrial countries perceived the greatest obstacles to doing business to be tax regulations and high taxes, labor regulations, safety or environmental regulations, financing, regulations for starting new businesses and operations, and general uncertainty about the costs of regulation. * Entrepreneurs in South Asia and Southeast Asia ranked the top obstacles to doing business as high taxes and tax regulations, inadequate infrastructure, inflation, labor regulations, and regulations for starting new businesses and operations. * In the Middle East and North Africa, entrepreneurs considered lack of infrastructure the chief obstacle to doing business, followed by corruption, high taxes and tax regulations, and financing. * In Central and Eastern Europe, high taxes and tax regulations were the only regulation-related obstacle ranked high, followed by financing, corruption, and inflation. * The worst obstacles in Latin America were considered to be corruption and inadequate infrastructure, followed by crime and theft, problems with finance, and high taxes and tax regulation. * In Sub-Saharan Africa the biggest problems were corruption, tax regulations and high taxes, inadequate infrastructure, inflation, crime and theft, and financing. This paper - a product of the Office of the Chief Economist and Senior Vice President, Development Economics- was produced as a background paper for World Development Report 1997 on the role of the state in a changing world. The study was funded in part by the Research Support Budget under the research projects Cross-Country Indicators of Institutional Uncertainty (RPO 680-51), and Indicators of Government Quality as Perceived by the Private Sector (RPO 681-52)
Credibility of rules and economic growth evidence from a worldwide survey of the private sector by Aymo Brunetti( file )
13 editions published between 1997 and 1999 in English and held by 65 libraries worldwide
April 1997 An indicator of the credibility of rules is constructed from broad cross-country survey data and it is shown that low credibility is associated with lower rates of growth and investment. Economic theory and case study evidence have long suggested that institutional factors, such as well-defined property and contract rights, may be crucial in explaining differences in economic performance across countries. Much of the recent discussion about governance has, for example, focused on the role of corruption and its consequences for investment and growth. By comparison, the empirical literature relating institutional factors with growth has been relatively scarce and has mainly concentrated on crude proxies such as political instability and macroeconomic volatility. The problem of most of these variables in that they inadequately capture the uncertainties that are relevant for entrepreneurs. Brunetti, Kisunko, and Weder propose new measures of institutional uncertainty based on the subjective evaluations of entrepreneurs. They surveyed the private sector in a broad cross-section of countries. The survey was designed to capture institutional factors such as the predictability of rules, entrepreneurs' fears of policy surprises and reversals, their perception of safety and security of property, the reliability of the judiciary, and their problems with bureaucratic corruption. The authors construct and test a summary indicator of the credibility of rules, as well as its components in standard cross-country growth and investment regressions. The main findings: The overall indicator of credibility is significantly related with higher rates of investment and growth. The credibility indicator calculated for the subsample of small local companies is even more closely related to the growth performance. The subindicators security of persons and property and predictability of rule-making are most closely associated with growth. The indicators of corruption, perceived political instability, and predictability of judiciary enforcement are most closely associated with investment. Preliminary results for an extended sample - including transition economies - indicate that institutional factors may also help to explain differences in economic performance in these countries. This paper - a product of the Office of the Chief Economist and Senior Vice President, Development Economics- was produced as a background paper for World Development Report 1997 on the role of the state in a changing world. The study was funded in part by the Research Support Budget under the research projects Cross-Country Indicators of Institutional Uncertainty (RPO 680-51), and Indicators of Government Quality as Perceived by the Private Sector (RPO 681-52)
Survey of Land And Real Estate Transactions In The Russian Federation Statistical Analysis of Selected Hypotheses by Gregory Kisunko( file )
3 editions published between 2007 and 2012 in English and Undetermined and held by 35 libraries worldwide
This paper analyzes land transactions between municipalities and private businesses based on official data and business surveys in 15 regions of the Russian Federation. Since the Russian Federation passed the new Land Code in 2001, land privatization has been officially encouraged by the federal government and in particular, land under previously privatized buildings was supposed to be privatized to the owner at a nominal price. The paper shows that many subnational authorities (which own or control the vast majority of land of interest to businesses) appear to use a combination of high statutory land buy-out prices and administrative barriers to deter land privatization and to offer "long-term leases" (which are not fully marketable) instead. On the other hand, regions that have established low buy-out prices and taken steps to remove unnecessary administrative barriers to land privatization appear to have higher rates of land ownership by businesses, and to face lower levels of corruption in the privatization process. The paper concludes that further reductions in the statutory prices for privatization of land under buildings and elimination of unnecessary administrative barriers should help to encourage further land privatization and the development of a competitive, secondary market in commercial land
Estimating the effects of corruption implications for Bangladesh by Aminur Rahman( file )
1 edition published in 2000 in English and held by 33 libraries worldwide
Countries that are serious about reducing corruption tend to attract more investment, both domestic and foreign, and to accelerate economic growth and poverty reduction
Survey of land and real estate transactions in the Russian Federation : statistical analysis of selected hypotheses by Gregory Kisunko( Book )
8 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 31 libraries worldwide
This paper analyzes land transactions between municipalities and private businesses based on official data and business surveys in 15 regions of the Russian Federation. Since the Russian Federation passed the new Land Code in 2001, land privatization has been officially encouraged by the federal government and in particular, land under previously privatized buildings was supposed to be privatized to the owner at a nominal price. The paper shows that many subnational authorities (which own or control the vast majority of land of interest to businesses) appear to use a combination of high statutory land buy-out prices and administrative barriers to deter land privatization and to offer "long-term leases" (which are not fully marketable) instead. On the other hand, regions that have established low buy-out prices and taken steps to remove unnecessary administrative barriers to land privatization appear to have higher rates of land ownership by businesses, and to face lower levels of corruption in the privatization process. The paper concludes that further reductions in the statutory prices for privatization of land under buildings and elimination of unnecessary administrative barriers should help to encourage further land privatization and the development of a competitive, secondary market in commercial land
Estimating the effects of corruption implications for Bangladesh by Aminur Rahman( Book )
9 editions published in 2000 in English and held by 31 libraries worldwide
Countries that are serious about reducing corruption tend to attract more investment, both domestic and foreign, and to accelerate economic growth and poverty reduction
How firms in 72 countries rate their institutional environment : a survey-based dataset measuring political institutions by Aymo Brunetti( Book )
2 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 3 libraries worldwide
Institutions in Transition Reliability of Rules and Economic Performance in Former Socialist Countries by Gregory Kisunko( Computer File )
1 edition published in 1999 in Undetermined and held by 2 libraries worldwide
Estimating the Effects of Corruption Implications for Bangladesh by Gregory Kisunko( file )
1 edition published in 1999 in Undetermined and held by 2 libraries worldwide
External finance and firm survival in the aftermath of the crisis : evidence from Eastern Europe and Central Asia by George R. G Clarke( file )
1 edition published in 2012 in Undetermined and held by 1 library worldwide
Local budget transparency and participation evidence from the Kyrgyz Republic by Damir Esenaliev( file )
1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 0 libraries worldwide
The paper investigates determinants of civic participation in local budget processes in rural areas in the Kyrgyz Republic by using data from the Life in Kyrgyzstan survey, conducted in 2012. The analysis of the data suggests that although civic awareness and interest in local budget processes is relatively high, the participation rate in local budgeting processes is low. The paper also shows that interest, awareness, and participation are positively associated with the age, education, employment, risk-taking attitudes, trust, and social capital of respondents. The paper documents that unawareness and lack of participation are largely related to being female, of non-Kyrgyz ethnic origin, inactive in the labor market, recent internal migrants, and residents of communities with poor infrastructure
Tax Compliance Perceptions And Formalization Of Small Businesses In South Africa by Jacqueline G Coolidge( Book )
3 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 0 libraries worldwide
The authors use firm-level survey data on 998 small and medium enterprises registered for tax in South Africa regarding tax compliance costs to investigate the use of outsourcing to complete tax compliance tasks. Overall, about 43 percent of the enterprises do all their tax compliance work in-house, 11 percent outsource all their tax compliance work, and the remaining 46 percent use a combination of both ('partial outsourcing'). The data display an inverted-U shape for outsourcing of tax compliance tasks: the smallest firms (those under R 300,000 turnover or well under US$50,000) tend not to outsource, due to a combination of relatively higher cost-burden and less complexity. Relatively larger firms (those with more than R 14 million turnover or about US$2 million) report that they have sufficient in-house capacity and therefore do not need to outsource. Those in the middle are most likely to outsource at least some of their tax compliance work, mostly because tax is a specialist field and they presumably lack sufficient capacity in-house. The survey data show that the costs of tax compliance are clearly the highest for those who engage in partial outsourcing, as it appears there is likely duplication of effort. Most such firms could reduce their tax compliance costs (and probably minimize the incidence of post-filing problems) by moving from partial to full outsourcing of all tax compliance work
Tax reform in Vietnam : toward a more efficient and equitable system ( file )
1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 0 libraries worldwide
Governors and governing institutions a comparative study of state-business relations in Russia's regions by Gulnaz Sharafutdinova( file )
1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 0 libraries worldwide
The paper uses the latest 2011 round of the Business Environment and Enterprise Performance Survey for the Russian Federation, which for the first time was designed to be representative of Russian regions. The paper takes a closer look at regional-level factors influencing the business environment in Russia and, more specifically, conditions that favor the emergence of symbiotic relations between regional authorities and regional businesses. Considering the argued significance of informal rules, norms, and agreements for the regional-level business environment in Russia, the paper uses proxy variables such as tenure and origin of regional governors to identify how these rules are being institutionalized. The findings reveal that, at least in case of Russia, juxtaposing the state and business actors as separate and opposed to each other may overstate the distinction between these two groups of actors and understate the fact that many localities in Russia have witnessed the emergence of mutually beneficial state-business arrangements. Defining whether these arrangements are beneficial or harmful to regional development is beyond the scope of this exploratory paper
 
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