skip to content

Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics

Overview
Works: 299 works in 385 publications in 2 languages and 489 library holdings
Genres: Periodicals  Interviews  Criticism, interpretation, etc  History  Catalogs  Biography  Pictorial works  Drama  Music 
Roles: Producer, Funder
Classifications: PN2051, 792
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics
Publications by Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics
Most widely held works by Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics
E-misférica ( file )
in English and held by 31 libraries worldwide
Teatralidades en el México virreinal ( file )
1 edition published in 2004 in Spanish and held by 7 libraries worldwide
Hemispheric Institute digital video library ( visu )
in English and held by 6 libraries worldwide
Performance by Diana Taylor( Book )
1 edition published in 2012 in Spanish and held by 5 libraries worldwide
Interview with Jesse Cooday (Tinglit) ( Computer File )
3 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 3 libraries worldwide
In this interview, conducted by the Hemispheric Institute's Native curator Raquel Chapa, Native American artist Jesse Cooday (Tinglit) talks about his work in both the American Indian Community House (AICH) gallery, where he has assisted the gallery director, and its performing arts department, as well as his work during the late 1980s, his activism in Alaska, and his work as a photographer. Cooday also reminisces about the many prominent Native artists that have come through the AICH. This interview complements the Hemispheric Institute Digital Video Library project's American Indian Community House collection. It is also featured on-line in the Hemispheric Institute's web cuaderno titled "Native Performance in New York City at the American Indian Community House."
Reverend Billy and the Church of stop-shopping live ( visu )
2 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 3 libraries worldwide
Video documentation of Reverend Billy and his Church of Stop Shopping's performance-intervention, presented as a part of the 4th Encuentro of the Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics, celebrated in July of 2003 in New York City, United States under the title 'Spectacles of Religiosities'. Reverend Billy is a character inhabited by the author/actor William 'Bill' Talen. An invention that resists titles like Performance Artist, Man of God, or Anarchist -- Reverend Billy and his Church of Stop Shopping have become popular as none of the above or as all three. In one form, this project is an interactive play, an evening-length church service that seems to evolve from comedy to some sort of secular spirituality that downtown New York hipsters embrace. Working in 300-seat theaters with large gospel choirs that sing anti-consumerist lyrics ('Stop Shopping! Stop Shopping! Now we can leave the Shopping Malls!'), the Reverend usually works, like a normal church, with a theme at each service. These range from anti-sweatshop concerns, to the neighborhood defense against the economy of tourism, to animal rights. However, Reverend Billy is best known for his Disney and Starbucks store invasions, which also combine the elements of drama, religion and politics. Post-performance discussion led by Jill Lane
Interview with Jesusa Rodríguez ( visu )
3 editions published between 2004 and 2009 in Spanish and held by 3 libraries worldwide
Mexican director, actress, playwright, performance artist, scenographer, entrepreneur, and social activist Jesusa Rodríguez moves seemingly effortlessly and with vigor across the spectrum of cultural forms, styles, and tones. Her espectáculos (as both spectacles and shows) challenge traditional classification, crossing with ease generic boundaries: from elite to popular to mass, from Greek tragedy to cabaret, from pre-Columbian indigenous to opera, from revue, sketch and carpa, to performative acts within political projects. Humor, satire, linguistic play, and the body are constants in her productions. Rodriguezs energy is intense and her commitment non-negotiable, always interrogating the nature, site, and consequences of power and its representation. In this interview the artist comments on her particular use and transformation of the genre of pastorela (nativity play) in her cabaret performances, as a tool for contesting political and religious fundamentalism in the Americas. The pastorelas, used by the Catholic Church as an evangelization tool during the Conquest, are usually based on a clean-cut distinction between Good and Evil, sustaining a binary thought that has fueled political, cultural and religious agendas in the American hemisphere. Rodríguez proposal to use the pastorela genre against the ideologically conservative institutions that originally introduced and used it, subversively mixes humor with religion in order to contest the Manichean politics at play in contemporary Western society. Performances like Concilio de Amor and Pastorela Terrorista are commented by the artist as examples of this performative strategy, which Rodríguez links to a broader concern with civic empowerment and education, issues of civil disobedience and popular participation
Interview with Tracy Davis what is performance studies? ( visu )
1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 2 libraries worldwide
Interview with Tracy Davis, conducted by Diana Taylor, founding director of the Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics. This interview is a part of a series curated by the Hemispheric Institute, articulated around the question 'What is Performance Studies?' The series aims to provide a multifaceted approach to the often difficult task of defining the coordinates of both a field of academic study as well as a lens through which to assess and document cultural practice and embodied behavior. The contingent definitions documented in this series are based on the groundbreaking experiences and the scholarly endeavors of renowned figures in contemporary performance studies and practice
Grupo Cultural Yuyachkani Antígona ( visu )
2 editions published in 2000 in Spanish and English and held by 2 libraries worldwide
Yuyachkani is a Quechua word that means "I am thinking, I am remembering." Using this name, and working to honor its meaning, the Peruvian theatre collective Grupo Cultural Yuyachkani (Yuyachkani Cultural Group) has been creating theatre since 1971. The group is comprised of seven actors (Augusto Casafranca, Amiel Cayo, Ana Correa, Débora Corrrea, Rebeca Ralli, Teresa Ralli, and Julián Vargas), a technical designer (Fidel Melquíades), and an artistic director (Miguel Rubio), who have made a commitment to collective creation as a mode of theatrical production and to group theatre as a life style. Yuyachkani members describe their collective as a "group that attempts to be united by dreams and utopias, by the adventure of creating -- why not? -- an alternative family that practices theatre as a way of life" (Memoria Anual 1990" n. pag.). The group's dreams, and its idea of utopia, are closely tied to Latin American and Peruvian political developments that privilege the popular classes and focus on meeting their economic, social and cultural needs
Interview with María Galindo (Mujeres Creando) ( visu )
1 edition published in 2007 in Spanish and held by 2 libraries worldwide
Interview with María Galindo of Mujeres Creando, conducted by Diana Taylor as a part of the 6th Encuentro of the Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics, celebrated in June of 2007 in Buenos Aires, Argentina under the title CORPOLÍTICAS en las Américas: Formaciones de Raza, Clase y Género / Body Politics in the Americas: Formations of Race, Class and Gender (http://hemi.nyu.edu/eng/seminar/2007/index.html). María Galindo is co-founder of Mujeres Creando (www.mujerescreando.org), an anarchist-feminist group created in 1992 in La Paz, Bolivia, that performs creative actions on the streets, produces videos, has its own newspaper and publishes books of poetry, feminist theory and sexuality, among other things. It is comprised of women of different cultural, social, and ethereal origins, and approaches creativity as an instrument of resistance and social participation
Grupo Cultural Yuyachkani theater work demonstration ( visu )
2 editions published in 2000 in Spanish and held by 2 libraries worldwide
Peru's most important theater collective, Grupo Cultural Yuyachkani has been working since 1971 at the forefront of theatrical experimentation, political performance, and collective creation. Yuyachkani is a Quechua word that means I am thinking, I am remembering; under this name, the theater group has devoted itself to the collective exploration of embodied social memory, particularly in relation to questions of ethnicity, violence, and memory in Peru. Their work has been among the most important in Latin Americas so called New Popular Theater, with a strong commitment to grass-roots community issues, mobilization, and advocacy. Yuyachkani won Perus National Human Rights Award in 2000. Known for its creative embrace of both indigenous performance forms as well as cosmopolitan theatrical forms, Yuyachkani offers insight into Peruvian and Latin American theater, and to broader issues of postcolonial social aesthetics.In this pedagogical demonstration, presented in the context of the first Encuentro of the Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics, held at Rio de Janeiro, Brazil in 2000, Teresa Ralli and Miguel Rubio explain Yuyachkanis acting process. The artists discuss the training of the actors body, as well as voice and character development; body training stresses body memory, composition and accumulation. This pedagogical demonstration also includes aspects of character development, discussing the relationships between everyday body practices and bodies onstage; weight, balance, volume, flows of energy and centers of balance, showcased in this demonstration, are central aspects in Yuyachkanis (re)search of what they term an actor múltiple or multiple actor. The interplay between technique and sensitive/bodily memory is central to the acting and pedagogical work of this Peruvian theater group
Susana Baca in concert ( visu )
1 edition published in 2005 in Spanish and held by 2 libraries worldwide
Susana Baca is the foremost singer of Afro-Peruvian music. Her music, on the Luaka Bop label, has promoted an awareness of the many cultural contributions of Afro-Peruvians. Also to this aim, she and her husband Ricardo Pereira are the founders and co-directors of the Instituto Negrocontinuo in Lima. She dedicated this concert in Belo Horizonte to women, and--with her infinite grace, her wide smile, her sensuous movements and her bare feet on stage--she performed songs like 'Molino Molero,' 'Caracunde,' 'Corazón Americano' (in honor of Milton Nascimento), 'Panalivio,' 'Toro Mata,' and 'Se me van los pies.' This concert was performed at the Palácio das Artes in Belo Horizonte, Brazil, as a part of the the 5th Encuentro of the Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics, titled Performing Heritage: Contemporary Indigenous and Community-Based Practices (http://hemisphericinstitute.org/eng/seminar/brazil2005/index.html).The concert was followed by a post-performance discussion with the audience
Mélange of contemporary American performance : Quetzal Guerrero, Larry Yazzie, David Pleasant & Dancing Earth ( visu )
1 edition published in 2005 in English and held by 2 libraries worldwide
Mélange of music and dance by contemporary Native American and African American performers, presented at the Francisco Nunes theater in Belo Horizonte, Brazil, as a part of the 5th Encuentro of the Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics, titled Performing Heritage: Contemporary Indigenous and Community-Based Practices (http://hemisphericinstitute.org/eng/seminar/brazil2005/index.html). This performance brings together four contemporary American performances drawing from the artists' cultural roots: Quetzal Guerrero (Native American violinist and dancer), Larry Yazzie (Meskwaki/ Dine World Champion Fancy Dancer), David Pleasant (African-American Gullah/Geeche percussion and song, performing with dancer Joyah Pugh), and Dancing Earth (Indigenous Modern Dance collective directed by Rulan Tangen, with the participation of Quetzal Guerrero, Anthony Thosh Collins and Alejandro Meraz). Quetzal Guerrero and Thosh Collins open the evening with a traditional chant from the Salt River Pima-Maricopa indian community, followed by Quetzal's original solo violin piece. Larry Yazzie then performs his dazzling powwow Fancy Dance from Tama, Iowa, followed by the energetic and powerful percussion of African American David Pleasant, who draws on rhythms dating back to slavery in the United States. Dancing Earth performs a dance piece about the creation of the earth, and the evening ends with all performers bringing together their traditions--and the audience--on stage. There is also a post-performance discussion with the artists, in which they talk about the origins and meanings of their performances
Interview with Marianela Boán ( visu )
2 editions published in 2001 in Spanish and held by 2 libraries worldwide
Interview with Marianela Boán, conducted by Shanna Lorenz during the 2nd Encuentro of the Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics, celebrated in June of 2001 in Monterrey, Mexico under the title Memory, Atrocity and Resistance. Marianela Boán graduated from Cubas National School of Dance in 1971 and received a degree in Hispanic Literature and Language from Havana University in 1981. For 15 years she worked as a dancer and choreographer for the dance company, Contemporary Dance of Cuba, which toured internationally. In 1988, she founded DanzAbierta where she has created a signature style mixing visual arts, theater, singing and music with dance to work through harsh contemporary conflicts. She calls her style danza contaminada (polluted dance). Her other choreography works have included the Cuban National Ballet, Venezia Balleto, and film works in Cuba, Canada, and Spain
2boys.tv Zona pellucida ( visu )
1 edition published in 2007 in English and held by 2 libraries worldwide
Within the folds of the zona pellucida, rapt in a somnambulous state, the accused begins to believe she is capable of the crimes with which she has been charged, and that perhaps, somehow, she has indeed carried out the horrific transgressions herself. Zona Pellucida, multimedia theater piece by 2boys.tv, was performed as a part of the 6th Encuentro of the Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics, celebrated in June of 2007 in Buenos Aires, Argentina under the title CORPOLÍTICAS en las Américas: Formaciones de Raza, Clase y Género / Body Politics in the Americas: Formations of Race, Class and Gender. 2boys.tv (Aaron Pollard and Stephen Lawson) is a theater and cabaret duo based in Montréal, Canada. Their multimedia performance pieces often incorporate video projections, soundscapes, found and original music scores, transgendered apparitions, outrageous costume, props, vocal/textual works, and the art of lip-sync. The video includes a post-performance discussion with the artists, moderated by Ramón Rivera-Servera
Interview with Javier Serna ( visu )
1 edition published in 2011 in Spanish and held by 2 libraries worldwide
Javier Serna is Research Professor of Theater Studies and Cultural Practices in the Theater Department at the Autonomous University of Nuevo Leon. His publications include The Theater At The End of Modernity In Encyclopedia of Monterrey (Grijalbo), section editor of the 'Republic of Theater' in Cat Step Theater Journal (Conaculta). He is a graduate of the London Drama Center, and teaches philosophical anthropology for the graduate school at UANL. He holds a doctorate in Performance Studies from New York University
Interview with Steve Elm (Oneida) ( visu )
2 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 2 libraries worldwide
Trained at London's Rose Bruford College, Steve Elm (Oneida) has appeared as an actor in film, television and on the stage. Elm has worked as a playwright and director with London's Common Body Theatre, University of Manchester (England), the American Indian Community House (AICH) Youth Theatre Project, and was a founding member of Chuka Lokoli Native Theatre Ensemble in New York City. He has also worked as an actor with the Only Make Believe company in New York City and as an actor/teacher with CUNY's Creative Arts Team. In this interview, conducted by the Hemispheric Institutes Native curator Raquel Chapa, Elm focuses on his past work and his struggle to fight stereotyping in Native theater. This interview also complements the Hemispheric Institute Digital Video Library project's American Indian Community House (AICH) Collection. It is also featured on-line in the Hemispheric Institutes web cuaderno titled 'Native Performance in New York City at the American Indian Community House.'
Hula as resistance ( visu )
1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 2 libraries worldwide
Hula as Resistance was presented as a part of the 7th Encuentro of the Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics, held in August of 2009 in Bogotá, Colombia, under the title 'Staging Citizenship: Cultural Rights in the Americas.' This 10-day event brought together activism, scholarship, and art around the themes of legacies, memories, struggles, and frontiers of citizenship. The chants and dances that were used in this performance praise and honor native Hawaiians' gods and chiefs. They celebrate their beloved lands, and call for unity and solidarity. Takamine is the founder and kumu hula (master teacher) of Pua Ali'i 'Ilima, a school of traditional Hawaiian dance. In addition, she teaches hula at UH Manoa and Leeward Community College. She graduated through the 'uniki rituals of hula from Maiki Aiu Lake. Vicky received her BA and MA in Dance Ethnology from the University of Hawai'i. Since 1997, she has coordinated demonstrations, rallies, and marches calling for social, economic, and environmental justice for native Hawaiians
Fortaleza de la Mujer Maya (FOMMA) : Soledad y Esperanza ( visu )
1 edition published in 2005 in Spanish and held by 2 libraries worldwide
Fortaleza de la Mujer Maya (FOMMA) is run by Petrona de la Cruz Cruz and Isabel Juárez Espinosa in Chiapas, Mexico. Their programs educate indigenous women and children in Tzeltal, Tzotzil and Spanish as well as offering an extensive array of vocational skills and theater workshops. FOMMA also provides services like childcare, women's rights education and healthcare. Partly based on Isabel's life, their play 'Soledad y Esperanza' is the story of two young indigenous sisters who have suffered physical and emotional abuse throughout their lives. Esperanza dreams of an education and of life in the big city. But her older sister Soledad denies her the chance to go to school and instead forces her to work as a maid for a dominating mestiza in the city. Despite the challenges she faces in this environment, Esperanza falls in love with Juan, the gardener. Once they're married, Juan and his new family return to his community, where he owns fertile lands that promise economic stability. Their happiness is short-lived, however, as Juan is brutally murdered by enemies who desire his property. Esperanza, alone and pregnant, sees no future in staying there. She decides to leave on an uncertain journey towards the border, dreaming of a better life. This piece was performed at the Francisco Nunes theater in Belo Horizonte, Brazil, as a part of the 5th Encuentro of the Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics, titled Performing Heritage: Contemporary Indigenous and Community-Based Practices (http://hemisphericinstitute.org/eng/seminar/brazil2005/index.html)
Coatlicue Theatre : Caracol, corazón de la tierra, flor de la esperanza ( visu )
1 edition published in 2005 in Spanish and held by 2 libraries worldwide
Elvira and Hortencia Colorado, Chichimec Otomi storytellers, playwrights, performers and community activists are founding members of the Coatlicue Theatre Company. Based in New York City, they are also members of danza Mexica Cetiliztli, New York Zapatistas and the American Indian Community House. 'Caracol, Corazón de la Tierra, Flor de la Esperanza' was created after the Colorado sisters lived and worked with communities in five autonomous municipalities in Chiapas, México. Their text is weaved from the voices of the Zapatista indigenous women they encountered. It is a collage of their thoughts, stories and music: the fire of their resistance, struggle and hope for a better future. This play was performed at the Francisco Nunes theater in Belo Horizonte, Brazil, as a part of the 5th Encuentro of the Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics, titled Performing Heritage: Contemporary Indigenous and Community-Based Practices (http://hemisphericinstitute.org/eng/seminar/brazil2005/index.html)
 
moreShow More Titles
fewerShow Fewer Titles
WorldCat IdentitiesRelated Identities
Alternative Names
New York University. Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics
Tisch School of the Arts. Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics
Languages
Spanish (15)
English (14)
Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.