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University of California, Berkeley International Human Rights Law Clinic

Overview
Works: 12 works in 19 publications in 1 language and 64 library holdings
Genres: Conference papers and proceedings 
Classifications: KF7675,
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about University of California, Berkeley
Publications by University of California, Berkeley
Most widely held works by University of California, Berkeley
Guantánamo and its aftermath : U.S. detention and interrogation practices and their impact on former detainees by Laurel E Fletcher( Book )
4 editions published between 2008 and 2009 in English and held by 25 libraries worldwide
This sobering report by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley adds a new chapter to the chronicle of America's dismal descent into the netherworld of prisoner abuse since the tragic events of September 11, 2001. Carefully researched and devoid of rhetoric, it traces the missteps that disfigured an internationally admired nation and tainted its self-proclaimed ideals of humane treatment and justice for all. Through the voices of detainees formerly held at U.S. detention facilities in Afghanistan and Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, the report provides new insights into the lingering consequences of unjust detention and the corrupted processes developed in the desperate months following 9/11
Rebuilding after Katrina : a population-based study of labor and human rights in New Orleans by Laurel E Fletcher( Book )
3 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 10 libraries worldwide
Study of documented and undocumented workers doing construction cleanup and related work in New Orleans following Hurricane Katrina, when federal labor regulations were relaxed to facilitate recovery. The study focused on demographic information about laborers, their needs and experiences, and the changing demographics of the workforce on the Gulf Coast following Hurricane Katrina. This study was undertaken by the International Human Rights Law Clinic and the Human Rights Center at the University of California, Berkeley, in collaboration with the Payson Center for International Development and Transfer Technology at Tulane University
Unwelcome guest : a study of expulsions of Haitians and Dominicans of Haitian descent from the Dominican Republic to Haiti ( Book )
1 edition published in 2002 in English and held by 2 libraries worldwide
Protecting people and the planet : a proposal to address the human rights impacts of climate change policy ( Book )
1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 2 libraries worldwide
Rebuilding after Kristina : a population-based study of labor and human rights in New Orleans ( Book )
1 edition published in 2006 in English and held by 1 library worldwide
Truth behind bars : Colombian paramilitary leaders in U.S. custody by Gretchen Gordon( Book )
1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 1 library worldwide
The Human Right to Water Bill in California : an implementation framework for state agencies by Angélica Salceda( Book )
2 editions published in 2013 in English and held by 1 library worldwide
In the child's best interest? : the consequences of losing a lawful immigrant parent to deportation by Jonathan Baum( Book )
1 edition published in 2010 in English and held by 1 library worldwide
Congress is considering a comprehensive overhaul of the nation's immigration laws more than a decade after the enactment of strict immigration measures. Lawmakers should take this opportunity to reaffirm the nation's historic commitment to family unity by addressing the discrete provisions that currently undermine it. Current U.S. immigration laws mandate deportation of lawful permanent resident (lpr) parents of thousands of U.S. citizen children, without providing these parents an opportunity to challenge their forced separations. Through a multi-disciplinary analysis, this policy brief examines the experiences of U.S. citizen children impacted by the forced deportation of their lpr parents and proposes ways to reform U.S. law consistent with domestic and international standards aimed to improve the lives of children. This report includes new, independent analysis of U.S. Department of Homeland Security (dhs) data. The authors estimate that more than 100,000 children have been affected by lpr parental deportation between 1997 and 2007, and that at least 88,000 of impacted children were U.S. citizens. Moreover, their analysis estimates that approximately 44,000 children were under the age of 5 when their parent was deported. In addition to these children, this analysis estimates that more than 217,000 others experienced the deportation of an immediate family member who was an lpr. The authors propose that the United States: (1) Restore judicial discretion in all cases involving the deportation of LPRs who have U.S. citizen children in order to give parents a meaningful opportunity to present evidence of the adverse impact that their deportation will have on their U.S. citizen children; (2) Revert to the pre-1996 definition of "aggravated felony"; (3) Collect data on U.S. citizen children impacted by deportation of an lpr parent; and (4) Establish guidelines for the exercise of discretion in cases involving the deportation of LPRs with U.S. citizen children. Data Sources and Methodology are appended. (Contains 1 figure, 2 tables and 92 notes. )[This report was co-produced by the International Human Rights Law Clinic at the University of California, Berkeley, School of Law and the Immigration Law Clinic at the University of California, Davis, School of Law. Parisa Ijadi-Maghsoodi provided legal analysis of immigration detention and removal defense, and conducted interviews of detainees as an intern in the Immigration Law Clinic at the University of California, Davis, School of Law (2010). Lisa Chavez conducted deportation and demographic data analysis. Quin Hodges contributed legal research and analysis of immigration laws and conducted interviews of detainees as an intern in the Immigration Law Clinic.]
Returning home resettlement and reintegration of detainees released from the U.S. naval base in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba : March 2009 by Berkeley University of California( file )
1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 0 libraries worldwide
 
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Alternative Names
University of California, Berkeley. School of Law. International Human Rights Law Clinic
Languages
English (19)
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