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Banerjee, Abhijit V.

Overview
Works: 138 works in 522 publications in 5 languages and 6,266 library holdings
Genres: History 
Roles: Author, Editor, Performer
Classifications: HB501, 339.46091724
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about Abhijit V Banerjee
Publications by Abhijit V Banerjee
Most widely held works by Abhijit V Banerjee
Poor economics : a radical rethinking of the way to fight global poverty by Abhijit V Banerjee( Book )
42 editions published between 2011 and 2015 in 6 languages and held by 1,705 libraries worldwide
This book offers a view of the lives of the world's poorest people, helping to explain why the poor tend to borrow in order to save, why they miss out on free life-saving immunizations but pay for drugs that they do not need, and the cointerintuitive challenges faced by those living on less than 99 cents a day. Billions of government dollars, and thousands of charitable organizations and NGOs, are dedicated to helping the world's poor. But much of the work they do is based on assumptions that are untested generalizations at best, flat out harmful misperceptions at worst. The authors have pioneered the use of randomized control trials in development economics. Work based on these principles, supervised by the Poverty Action Lab at MIT, is being carried out in dozens of countries. Their work transforms certain presumptions: that microfinance is a cure-all, that schooling equals learning, that poverty at the level of 99 cents a day is just a more extreme version of the experience any of us have when our income falls uncomfortably low. Throughout, the authors emphasize that life for the poor is simply not like life for everyone else: it is a much more perilous adventure, denied many of the cushions and advantages that are routinely provided to the more affluent
Creative capitalism : a conversation with Bill Gates, Warren Buffett, and other economic leaders by Michael E Kinsley( Book )
2 editions published between 2008 and 2009 in English and held by 968 libraries worldwide
Bill Gates is more than the world's most successful capitalist; he's also the world's biggest philanthropist. Gates has approached philanthropy the same way he revolutionized computer software: with a fierce ambition to change the rules of the game. That's why at the 2008 annual meeting of the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, Gates advocated a creative capitalism in which big corporations, the distinguishing feature of the modern global economy, integrate doing good into their way of doing business. This controversial new idea is discussed and debated by the more than forty contributors to this book, among them three Nobel laureates and two former U.S. cabinet secretaries. Edited by author and columnist Michael Kinsley, Creative Capitalism started as a first-of-its-kind online conversation that brought together some of the world's best minds to engage Gates's challenge. From Warren Buffett, who seconds Gates's analysis, to Lawrence Summers, who worries about the consequences of multiple corporate objectives, the essays cover a broad spectrum of opinion. Judge Richard Posner dismisses Gates's proposal as trumped-up charity that will sap the strengths of the profit-maximizing corporation, while journalist Martin Wolf maintains that the maximization of profit is far from universally accepted, and rightly so. Chicago Nobel laureate Gary Becker wonders whether altruistic companies can survive in a competitive economy, while Columbia Nobel laureate Edmund Phelps argues that a little altruism might be the right prescription for a variety of market imperfections. Creative Capitalism is not just a book for philanthropists. It's a book that challenges the conventional wisdom about our economic system, a road map for the new global economy that is emerging as capitalism adapts itself once again to a changing world
Understanding poverty by Abhijit V Banerjee( Book )
19 editions published in 2006 in English and held by 502 libraries worldwide
"Understanding poverty and what to do about it, is perhaps the central concern of all of economics. Yet the lay public almost never gets to hear what leading professional economists have to say about it. This volume brings together twenty-eight essays by some of the world leaders in the field, who were invited to tell the lay reader about the most important things they have learnt from their research that relate to poverty. The essays cover a wide array of topics: the first essay is about how poverty gets measured. The next section is about the causes of poverty and its persistence, and the ideas range from the impact of colonialism and globalization to the problems of "excessive" population growth, corruption and ethnic conflict. The next section is about policy: how should we fight poverty? The essays discuss how to get drug companies to produce more vaccines for the diseases of the poor, what we should and should not expect from micro-credit, what we should do about child labor, how to design welfare policies that work better and a host of other topics. The final section is about where the puzzles lie: what are the most important anomalies, the big gaps in the way economists think about poverty? The essays talk about the puzzling reluctance of Kenyan farmers to fertilizers, the enduring power of social relationships in economic transactions in developing countries and the need to understand where aspirations come from, and much else. Every essay is written with the aim of presenting the latest and the most sophisticated in economics without any recourse to jargon or technical language."--Publisher description
Making aid work by Abhijit V Banerjee( Book )
10 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 324 libraries worldwide
"Affecting one in six people in the world today, the problem of global poverty is perhaps our greatest moral challenge. But as millions of dollars flow to poor countries, the results are often disappointing. Making Aid Work provides a forum on how to evaluate aid programs and calls for economists to change their way of thinking, offering a blueprint for effective aid." "Abhijit Vinayak Banerjee - an "aid optimist"--Argues that the lack of analysis about which programs really work causes considerable waste. He challenges aid donors to do better, urging them to assess programs with field experiments using randomized trials. Experts respond, raising broad questions about the kind of interventions (micro and macro, political or economic) that will lead to real improvements in the lives of poor people around the world. Although they may disagree on many issues, their responses underscore a growing consensus that impact evaluations of aid programs must improve."--Jacket
Volatility and growth by Philippe Aghion( Book )
14 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 274 libraries worldwide
"It has long been recognized that productivity growth and the business cycle are closely interrelated. Yet, until recently, the two phenomena have been investigated separately in the economics literature. Using both, simple theoretical models and empirical analysis, the authors show that by looking at the economy through the lens of private entrepreneurs, who invest under credit constraints, one can go a long way towards explaining persistent macroeconomic volatility and the effects of volatility on growth. At the same time, they propose a new approach to analyze the impact of macroeconomic policies on long run growth and the design of stabilisation programs."--Jacket
Poor economics a radical rethinking of the way to fight global poverty by Abhijit V Banerjee( Sound Recording )
5 editions published between 2011 and 2012 in English and held by 84 libraries worldwide
The authors have pioneered the use of randomized control trials in development economics. Work based on these principles is being carried out in dozens of countries. Drawing on this and their fifteen years of research from Chile to India, they have identified wholly new aspects of the behavior of poor people, their needs, and the way that aid or financial investment can affect their lives. This book illuminates how the poor live, and offers an opportunity to think of a world beyond poverty
Poor economics : barefoot hedge-fund managers, DIY doctors and the surprising truth about life on less than 1 dollar a day by Abhijit V Banerjee( Book )
7 editions published between 2011 and 2012 in English and held by 60 libraries worldwide
"Billions of government dollars, and thousands of charitable organizations and NGOs, are dedicated to helping the world's poor. But much of the work they do is based on assumptions that are untested generalizations at best, flat out harmful misperceptions at worst. Banerjee and Duflo have pioneered the use of randomized control trials in development economics. Work based on these principles, supervised by the Poverty Action Lab at MIT, is being carried out in dozens of countries. Their work transforms certain presumptions: that microfinance is a cure-all, that schooling equals learning, that poverty at the level of 99 cents a day is just a more extreme version of the experience any of us have when our income falls uncomfortably low. Throughout, the authors emphasize that life for the poor is simply not like life for everyone else: it is a much more perilous adventure, denied many of the cushions and advantages that are routinely provided to the more affluent"
Pitfalls of Participatory Programs Evidence From A Randomized Evaluation In Education In India by Abhijit V Banerjee( file )
18 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 51 libraries worldwide
Participation of beneficiaries in the monitoring of public services is increasingly seen as key to improving their efficiency. In India, the current government flagship program on universal primary education organizes community members, specifically locally elected leaders and parents of children enrolled in public schools, into committees and gives these powers over resource allocation, monitoring and management of school performance. However, in a baseline survey this paper finds that people were not aware of the existence of these committees and their potential for improving education. The paper evaluates three different interventions to encourage beneficiaries' participation: providing information, training community members in a new testing tool, and training and organizing volunteers to hold remedial reading camps for illiterate children. The authors find that these interventions had no impact on community involvement in public schools, and no impact on teacher effort or learning outcomes in those schools. However, the intervention that trained volunteers to teach children to read had large impact on activity outside public schools -- local youths volunteered to be trained, and children who attended these camps substantially improved their reading skills. These results suggest that citizens face substantial constraints in participating to improve the public education system, even when they care about education and are willing to do something to improve it
Inequality and growth : what can the data say? by Abhijit V Banerjee( Book )
14 editions published in 2000 in English and held by 50 libraries worldwide
Abstract: This paper describes the correlations between inequality and the growth rates in cross-country data. Using non-parametric methods, we show that the growth rate is an inverted U-shaped function of net changes in inequality: Changes in inequality (in any direction) are associated with reduced growth in the next period. The estimated relationship is robust to variations in control variables and estimation methods. This inverted U-curve is consistent with a simple political economy model, although, as we point out, efforts to interpret this model causally run into difficult identification problems. We show that this non-linearity is sufficient to explain why previous estimates of the relationship between the level of inequality and growth are so different from one another
Remedying education : evidence from two randomized experiments in India by Abhijit Banerjee( Book )
7 editions published between 2005 and 2006 in English and held by 30 libraries worldwide
This paper presents the results of two experiments conducted in Mumbai and Vadodara, India, designed to evaluate ways to improve the quality of education in urban slums. The authors argue that resources alone may not be sufficient to improve educational outcomes. The authors study the impact of a remedial education programme which hired young women from the community to teach basic literacy and numeracy skills to children lagging behind in government schools. A computer-assisted learning programme also provided each child in the fourth grade with two hours of shared computer time per week, in which students played educational games that reinforced mathematics skills
Public action for public goods by Abhijit V Banerjee( Book )
15 editions published between 2006 and 2007 in English and held by 28 libraries worldwide
This paper focuses on the relationship between public action and access to public goods. It begins by developing a simple model of collective action which is intended to capture the various mechanisms that are discussed in the theoretical literature on collective action. We argue that several of these intuitive theoretical arguments rely on special additional assumptions that are often not made clear. We then review the empirical work based on the predictions of these models of collective action. While the available evidence is generally consistent with these theories, there is a dearth of quality evidence. Moreover, a large part of the variation in access to public goods seems to have nothing to do with the "bottom-up" forces highlighted in these models and instead reflect more "top-down" interventions. We conclude with a discussion of some of the historical evidence on top-down interventions
Marry for what : caste and mate selection in modern India by Abhijit V Banerjee( Book )
15 editions published between 2009 and 2012 in English and held by 22 libraries worldwide
This paper studies the role played by caste, education and other social and economic attributes in arranged marriages among middle-class Indians. We use a unique data set on individuals who placed matrimonial advertisements in a major newspaper, the responses they received, how they ranked them, and the eventual matches. We estimate the preferences for caste, education, beauty, and other attributes. We then compute a set of stable matches, which we compare to the actual matches that we observe in the data. We find the stable matches to be quite similar to the actual matches, suggesting a relatively frictionless marriage market. One of our key empirical findings is that there is a very strong preference for within-caste marriage. However, because both sides of the market share this preference and because the groups are fairly homogeneous in terms of the distribution of other attributes, in equilibrium, the cost of wanting to marry within-caste is low. This allows caste to remain a persistent feature of the Indian marriage market
Can institutions be reformed from within? : evidence from a randomized experiment with the rajasthan police by Abhijit V Banerjee( Book )
12 editions published in 2012 in English and held by 21 libraries worldwide
Institutions in developing countries, particularly those inherited from the colonial period, are often thought to be subject to strong inertia. This study presents the results of a unique randomized trial testing whether these institutions can be reformed through incremental administrative change. The police department of the state of Rajasthan, India collaborated with researchers at US and Indian universities to design and implement four interventions to improve police performance and the public's perception of the police in 162 police stations (covering over one-fifth of the State's police stations and personnel): (1) placing community observers in police stations; (2) a freeze on transfers of police staff; (3) in-service training to update skills; and (4) weekly duty rotation with a guaranteed day off per week. These reforms were evaluated using data collected through two rounds of surveys including police interviews, decoy visits to police stations, and a large-scale public opinion and crime victimization survey--the first of its kind in India. The results illustrate that two of the reform interventions, the freeze on transfers and the training, improved police effectiveness and public and crime victims' satisfaction. The decoy visits also led to an improvement in police performance. The other reforms showed no robust effects. This may be due to constraints on local implementation: The three successful interventions did not require the sustained cooperation of the communities or the local authorities (the station heads) and they were robustly implemented throughout the project. In contrast, the two unsuccessful interventions, which required local implementation, were not systematically implemented
On the road : access to transportation infrastructure and economic growth in China by Abhijit V Banerjee( Book )
13 editions published in 2012 in English and held by 20 libraries worldwide
This paper estimates the effect of access to transportation networks on regional economic outcomes in China over a twenty-period of rapid income growth. It addresses the problem of the endogenous placement of networks by exploiting the fact that these networks tend to connect historical cities. Our results show that proximity to transportation networks have a moderate positive causal effect on per capita GDP levels across sectors, but no effect on per capita GDP growth. We provide a simple theoretical framework with empirically testable predictions to interpret our results. We argue that our results are consistent with factor mobility playing an important role in determining the economic benefits of infrastructure development -- National Bureau of Economic Research web site
The diffusion of microfinance by Abhijit V Banerjee( Book )
11 editions published in 2012 in English and held by 19 libraries worldwide
We examine how participation in a microfinance program diffuses through social networks. We collected detailed demographic and social network data in 43 villages in South India before microfinance was introduced in those villages and then tracked eventual participation. We exploit exogenous variation in the importance (in a network sense) of the people who were first informed about the program, 'the injection points'. Microfinance participation is higher when the injection points have higher eigenvector centrality. We estimate structural models of diffusion that allow us to (i) determine the relative roles of basic information transmission versus other forms of peer influence, and (ii) distinguish information passing by participants and non-participants. We find that participants are significantly more likely to pass information on to friends and acquaintances than informed non-participants, but that information passing by non-participants is still substantial and significant, accounting for roughly a third of informedness and participation. We also find that, conditioned on being informed, an individual's decision is not significantly affected by the participation of her acquaintances
Long run health impacts of income shocks : wine and phylloxera in 19th century France by Abhijit V Banerjee( Book )
9 editions published in 2007 in English and held by 19 libraries worldwide
This paper provides estimates of the long-term effects on height and health of a large income shock experienced in early childhood. Phylloxera, an insect that attacks the roots of grape vines, destroyed 40% of French vineyards between 1863 and 1890, causing major income losses among wine growing families. Because the insects spread slowly from the southern coast of France to the rest of the country, Phylloxera affected different regions in different years. We exploit the regional variation in the timing of this shock to identify its effects. We examine the effects on the adult height, health, and life expectancy of children born in the years and regions affected by the Phylloxera. The shock decreased long run height, but it did not affect other dimensions of health, including life expectancy. We find that, at age 20, those born in affected regions were about 1.8 millimeters shorter than others. This estimate implies that children of wine-growing families born when the vines were affected in their regions were 0.6 to 0.9 centimeters shorter than others by age 20. This is a significant effect since average heights grew by only 2 centimeters in the entire 19th century
Why has unemployment risen in the new South Africa? by Abhijit V Banerjee( Book )
9 editions published between 2006 and 2007 in English and held by 18 libraries worldwide
"We document the rise in unemployment in South Africa since the transition in 1994. We describe the likely causes of this increase and analyze whether the increase in unemployment is due to structural changes in the economy (resulting in a new equilibrium unemployment rate) or to negative shocks (that temporarily have increased unemployment). We conclude the former are more important. Our analysis includes a multinomial logit approach to understanding transitions in individual-level changes in labor market status using the first nationally representative panel in South Africa. Our analysis highlights several key constraints to addressing unemployment in South Africa."--Abstract
The experimental approach to development economics by Abhijit V Banerjee( Book )
12 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 16 libraries worldwide
Randomized experiments have become a popular tool in development economics research, and have been the subject of a number of criticisms. This paper reviews the recent literature, and discusses the strengths and limitations of this approach in theory and in practice. We argue that the main virtue of randomized experiments is that, due to the close collaboration between researchers and implementers, they allow the estimation of parameters that it would not otherwise be possible to evaluate. We discuss the concerns that have been raised regarding experiments, and generally conclude that while they are real, they are often not specific to experiments. We conclude by discussing the relationship between theory and experiments
Aging and death under a dollar a day by Abhijit V Banerjee( Book )
10 editions published between 2007 and 2008 in English and held by 16 libraries worldwide
This paper uses household survey data form several developing countries to investigate whether the poor (defined as those living under $1 or $2 dollars a day at PPP) and the non poor have different mortality rates in old age. We construct a proxy measure of longevity, which is the probability that an adult's mother and father are alive. The non-poor's mothers are more likely to be alive than the poor's mothers. Using panel data set for Indonesia and Vietnam, we also find that older adults are significantly more likely to have died five years later if they are poor. The direction of causality is unclear: the poor may be poor because they are sick (and thus more likely to die), or they could die because they are poor
The shape of temptation : implications for the economic lives of the poor by Abhijit V Banerjee( Book )
13 editions published in 2010 in English and held by 15 libraries worldwide
This paper argues that the relation between temptations and the level of consumption plays a key role in explaining the observed behaviors of the poor. Temptation goods are defined to be the set of goods that generate positive utility for the self that consumes them, but not for any previous self that anticipates that they will be consumed in the future. We show that the assumption of declining temptations, which says that the fraction of the marginal dollar that is spent on temptation goods decreases with overall consumption, has a number of striking implications for the investment, savings, borrowing and risk-taking behavior of the poor, which would not arise if temptations were either non-declining or entirely absent. Moreover the predicted behaviors under the declining temptation assumption can help us explain some of the puzzling facts about the poor that have been emphasized in the recent literature
 
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Alternative Names
Abhijit Banerjee.
Abhijit Banerjee indischer Wirtschaftswissenschaftler und Hochschullehrer
Abhijit Vinayak Banerjee.
Abhijit Vinayak Banerjee 1961-
Banarjee, Abhijit V. 1961-
Banerjee, Abhijit
Banerjee, Abhijit 1961-
Banerjee, Abhijit V.
Banerjee, Abhijit Vinayak
Banerjee, Abhijit Vinayak 1961-
Banerjee, Abihijit 1961-
Bannerjee, Abhijit V. 1961-
econimics 1
Vinayak-Banerjee, Abhijit 1961-
ਅਭੀਜੀਤ ਬੈਨਰਜੀ
அபிஜித் பேனர்ஜீ
バナジー, アビジット V.
Languages
English (245)
German (4)
French (3)
Italian (3)
Chinese (1)
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