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DEFENCE RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CANADA OTTAWA (Ont.) CENTRE FOR SECURITY SCIENCE

Overview
Works: 4 works in 4 publications in 1 language and 5 library holdings
Classifications: HV551.5.C2, 363.34560971
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about DEFENCE RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CANADA OTTAWA (Ont.) CENTRE FOR SECURITY SCIENCE
Publications by DEFENCE RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CANADA OTTAWA (Ont.) CENTRE FOR SECURITY SCIENCE
Most widely held works by DEFENCE RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CANADA OTTAWA (Ont.) CENTRE FOR SECURITY SCIENCE
Creating and Sustaining Meta-organizational Memory: A Case Study ( file )
1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 0 libraries worldwide
The case study of the Chemical, Biological, Radiological-Nuclear and Explosives (CBRNE) Research and Technology Initiative (CRTI), a Canadian government meta-organizational collaborative initiative, is presented. Multiple federal departments and agencies have a joint responsibility for creating a knowledge base and a national memory for the purposes of protecting the country against CBRNE threats posed by terrorists. The conditions of a meta-organization present particular opportunities and challenges for organizational learning and organizational memory. Organizational learning and knowledge management theory provide the premises for addressing these issues. An intentional knowledge management strategy has been instrumental in organizational learning, resulting in a knowledge base for a collective organizational memory. Ongoing challenges are being addressed by the strategy
The Use of Archaeological and Anthropological Methods in Fatal Fire Scene Investigation ( file )
1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 0 libraries worldwide
This report will highlight some of the techniques and technologies of archaeologists and anthropologists that may be of assistance in fatal fire scene investigation. The value of archaeological techniques has been previously acknowledged in fire scene recovery and the primary principals of excavation are often applied; however the full range of methods and techniques available has not yet been fully exploited. Many additional aspects of archaeological and anthropological work can be adapted and applied to fatal fire scene investigation to provide further opportunities to maximize evidence recovery and interpretation. The application of some of these techniques does require evidential proof of value, as well as research into how best to use these systems. These research avenues and identified areas of need will be discussed to consider where future research may be beneficial
Testing the Capacity of the NBDRP EX30701 ( file )
1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 0 libraries worldwide
The National Biological Dosimetry Response Plan (NBDRP) is currently comprised of four core laboratories (Health Canada (HC), Defence Research and Development Canada-Ottawa (DRDC), McMaster University (MU), and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL)) that are capable of providing radiation biological dose estimates using the dicentric chromosome assay (DCA). As indicated in the CRTI-06-0146RD charter, the existing biological dosimetry capacity in Canada will be greatly enhanced by conducting ongoing training and exercising of the four core laboratories. This exercise (EX30701) was designed to maintain a vigilant level of DCA training and scoring ability for all new and existing employees. The goal of this exercise was to broaden the expertise base within the core laboratories and assess the current scoring ability of all identified employees within the core laboratories. In this exercise we also plan to test whether using a "DCA Quick Scan" method, devised by AECL, versus the actual "DCA Full Triage" method greatly increases the scoring speed and still maintain a comparable level of accuracy. In addition, the core laboratories standardized and incorporated an additional routine biodosimetry method, the cytokinesis block micronucleus assay (CBMN), into the NBDRP to further expand Canada's rapid response capabilities for screening large volumes of samples. Although not radiation specific, this assay readily detects radiation-induced chromosomal damage, requires less training for scoring and, in a mass casualty scenario, could be better suited than the DCA for screening large volumes of samples
A parallel study between the resource typing as outlined in the American NIMS document and the levels of service required of the police forces of Quebec by Robert Beaudry( file )
1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 0 libraries worldwide
The purpose of this study is to define which Resource Type is applicable to the Province of Quebec and its law enforcement. This report will take into account the levels of police services that the municipal police forces in Quebec and the Surete du Quebec must provide according to their level of jurisdiction. We will, therefore, attempt to create a parallel between the Resource Typing for the law enforcement and security forces outlined in the NIMS document and the levels of police services held in Quebec. Toward the end of the study, we will look into the services offered by the RCMP in Quebec relative to Resource Typing
 
Languages
English (4)
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