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Hemispheric Institute Digital Video Library

Overview
Works: 635 works in 907 publications in 3 languages and 1,184 library holdings
Genres: Drama  Interviews  Legends  Pastoral drama  Film adaptations  Parodies, imitations, etc  Fiction 
Classifications: PR2807,
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about Hemispheric Institute Digital Video Library
Publications by Hemispheric Institute Digital Video Library
Most widely held works by Hemispheric Institute Digital Video Library
Little women ( visu )
2 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 4 libraries worldwide
Since 1981, the Split Britches Company (founded by Lois Weaver, Peggy Shaw, and Deb Margolin) has written and performed in trio, duet, and solo, as well as collaborated and performed with other artists. They describe their work in this way: 'Our work is rooted in popular culture, but positioned against it. It relies on moments rather than plot, relationships rather than story. It depends on the surprise of transformation rather than the logic of psychological narrative. It straddles the line between performance and theater, exploiting theatricality while exposing the pretense. It is about a community of outsiders, queers, eccentrics. It is feminist because it encourages the imaginative potential in everyone and lesbian because it takes the presence of lesbian on stage as a given.' Their vaudevillian satirical gender-bending performances have received numerous awards, including a Jane Chamber award and four Village Voice OBIE awards. This video documents the first version of their show Little Women: The Tragedy. Here performed as a work-in-progress, the piece tackles complex issues of pornography and feminism through the humor of only two possibilities: heaven or hell, preacher or prostitute, and the left hand and right hand of Louisa May Alcott
Interview with Santiago García ( visu )
3 editions published between 1999 and 2009 in Spanish and held by 4 libraries worldwide
Three-session interview with Santiago García, theater director, theorist, playwright, and founder of renowned Colombian theater ensemble Teatro La Candelaria (www.teatrolacandelaria.org.co), conducted by Chicano theater scholar Alma Martinez. In this extensive interview, García discusses key topics germane to his artistic work, narrating his first experiences in theater, the artistic trajectory of La Candelaria (founded in 1966, and still one of the most important theater groups in Latin America), and his personal take on popular theater, collective creation, the influence of Brechtian theories in his artistic work, the role of the director in collaborative artistic collectives, and the state of the scenic arts in Colombia in the context of economic and political crisis. Santiago also comments on the influences and points of contact between Latin American and Latino theaters based on his personal experiences traveling and working with different theater groups, including the Chicano theater ensemble El Teatro Campesino; under the rubric of the 'popular', García analyzes the artistic affinities and ideological choices present in collective creation across the Americas. Finally, the artist shares his thoughts on La Candelaria's rendition of 'El Quijote', based on García's personal adaptation of this literary masterpiece. A carnivalesque mixture of cultures and traditions, this play highlights shared traits between the Spanish novel and Colombian culture, while performing a commentary on illusions, fantasy and utopia, elements that the author finds absent in present-day Colombia
Museo de la identidad fetich-izada : Pocha Nostra workshop ( visu )
3 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 4 libraries worldwide
Unedited documentation of a Pocha Nostra interactive performance in the Museo del Chopo, Mexico City. After an intensive workshop with 15 local performance/visual artists, curators, DJ's and musicians, the troupe performs an 'experimental curiosity cabinet', a sort of living museum where participants exhibit constructed 'hybrid personas' based on their own complex identities and personal sense of race and gender. These 'cultural especimens' compose a diorama of fetishized identities, addressing issues of appropriation of hybridity by corporate multiculturalism. La Pocha Nostra (www.pochanostra.com) is an ever-morphing trans-disciplinary arts organization, founded in 1993 by Guillermo Gómez-Peña, Roberto Sifuentes, and Nola Mariano in California. The objective was to formally conceptualize Gómez-Peña's collaborations with other performance artists. It provides a base (and forum) for a loose network of rebel artists from various disciplines, generations and ethnic backgrounds, whose common denominator is the desire to cross and erase dangerous borders between art and politics, practice and theory, artist and spectator. As of June 2006, members include performance artists Guillermo Gómez-Peña, Violeta Luna, Michelle Ceballos, and Roberto Sifuentes; curators Gabriela Salgado and Orlando Britto; and over thirty associates worldwide in countries such as Mexico, Spain, the UK, and Australia. Projects range from performance solos and duets to large-scale performance installations including video, photography, audio, and cyber-art. La Pocha collaborates across national borders, race, gender and generations. Their collaborative model functions both as an act of citizen diplomacy and as a means to create ephemeral communities of like-minded rebels. The basic premise of these collaborations is founded on an ideal: If we learn to cross borders on stage, we may learn how to do so in larger social spheres. La Pocha strives to eradicate myths of purity and dissolve borders surrounding culture, ethnicity, gender, language, and métier. These are radical acts
Interview with Diamela Eltit ( visu )
2 editions published between 2007 and 2011 in Spanish and held by 4 libraries worldwide
Interview with Diamela Eltit, conducted by Carmen Oquendo-Villar as a part of the 6th Encuentro of the Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics, celebrated in June of 2007 in Buenos Aires, Argentina under the title 'CORPOLÍTICAS en las Américas: Formaciones de Raza, Clase y Género / Body Politics in the Americas: Formations of Race, Class and Gender' (http://hemi.nyu.edu/eng/seminar/2007/index.html). Diamela Eltit is a Chilean writer. She studied literature at the Universidad Católica de Chile and at the Universidad de Chile. She is founding member of the interdisciplinary group CADA
Split Britches ( visu )
2 editions published between 1980 and 1984 in English and held by 4 libraries worldwide
Since 1981, the Split Britches Company (founded by Lois Weaver, Peggy Shaw, and Deb Margolin, www.splitbritches.com) has written and performed in trio, duet, and solo, as well as collaborated and performed with other artists. They describe their work in this way: 'Our work is rooted in popular culture, but positioned against it. It relies on moments rather than plot, relationships rather than story. It depends on the surprise of transformation rather than the logic of psychological narrative. It straddles the line between performance and theater, exploiting theatricality while exposing the pretense. It is about a community of outsiders, queers, eccentrics. It is feminist because it encourages the imaginative potential in everyone and lesbian because it takes the presence of lesbian on stage as a given.' Their vaudevillian satirical gender-bending performances have received numerous awards, including a Jane Chamber award and four Village Voice OBIE awards. Their collection of scripts, Split Britches Feminist Performance/Lesbian Practice, edited by Sue Ellen Case, won the 1997 Lambda Literary Award for Drama. This video documents a first rehearsal of the first draft of their show Split Britches- The True Story, which marks the initial collaboration of the trio and is the show from which they got their name. Conceived and directed by Lois Weaver, its a show based on true stories of three members of Weavers family in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia, United States. It also marks the beginning of the companys aesthetic: weaving multiple true stories in one, trusting the details of the everyday and relying on relation rather than action.The Christian Science Monitor called this play a tiny masterpiece
Salad of the Bad Café ( visu )
4 editions published between 1998 and 2000 in English and held by 4 libraries worldwide
Since 1981, the Split Britches Company (founded by Lois Weaver, Peggy Shaw, and Deb Margolin, www.splitbritches.com) has written and performed in trio, duet, and solo, as well as collaborated and performed with other artists. They describe their work in this way: 'Our work is rooted in popular culture, but positioned against it. It relies on moments rather than plot, relationships rather than story. It depends on the surprise of transformation rather than the logic of psychological narrative. It straddles the line between performance and theater, exploiting theatricality while exposing the pretense. It is about a community of outsiders, queers, eccentrics. It is feminist because it encourages the imaginative potential in everyone and lesbian because it takes the presence of lesbian on stage as a given.' Their vaudevillian satirical gender-bending performances have received numerous awards, including a Jane Chamber award and four Village Voice OBIE awards. Their collection of scripts, 'Split Britches Feminist Performance/Lesbian Practice', edited by Sue Ellen Case, won the 1997 Lambda Literary Award for Drama. 'Salad of the Bad Café' is a postmodern cabaret written and performed by Lois Weaver and Peggy Shaw of Split Britches and Asian American performance artist Stacy Makishi. Inspired by Carson McCullers' story 'The Ballad of the Sad Café' and the lives of Tennessee Williams and Yukio Mishima, it is a treatise on love in a post-claustrophobic era. The play begins in 1945, in the summer that lay between the war and the postwar period when Japan was weeping, the American South was seething and the word 'gender' was mostly used in grammar class. The setting is a café where people come to spend a few hours so that the 'deep bitter knowing that their life is not worth much can be laid to rest.' Racial, gender and regional stereotypes such as 'the drunken homosexual writer, the gender outlaw, the homo-erotic cowboy, the reluctant lesbian bride, the mutant refugee, the faded southern belle, the geisha and the soldier,' come together to tell a story of unrequited love, in an attempt to demystify the Queer, disorient the Orient and demythify the Southern Gothic and the American Grotesque. This is one of the most recent versions of the piece, performed in Boston in 2000
Donde el viento hace buñuelos ( visu )
2 editions published in 2004 in Spanish and held by 4 libraries worldwide
With over 25 years of ongoing theater practice and more than 20 plays performed locally and internationally for a diverse audience, Malayerba is committed to theater pedagogy and experimentation, artistic collaboration, and community building. They have represented Ecuador in national and international theater festivals; they have also collaborated with theater groups within Ecuador and in other countries, and performed for both film and television, while engaging in community work in Quito. In 1989 the group created the Laboratorio Malayerba, committed to the training of generations of young Ecuadorian actors and to an ongoing investigation of theories and practices of experimental theater. In 2001 Malayerba launched the theater journal 'Hoja de Teatro,' conceived as a forum for the theorization, criticism and dissemination of Ecuadorian theater practices
Susana Baca in concert ( visu )
2 editions published between 2003 and 2005 in Spanish and held by 4 libraries worldwide
Susana Baca is the foremost singer of Afro-Peruvian music. Her music, on the Luaka Bop label, has promoted an awareness of the many cultural contributions of Afro-Peruvians. Also to this aim, she and her husband Ricardo Pereira are the founders and co-directors of the Instituto Negrocontinuo in Lima. She dedicated this concert in Belo Horizonte to women, and--with her infinite grace, her wide smile, her sensuous movements and her bare feet on stage--she performed songs like 'Molino Molero,' 'Caracunde,' 'Corazón Americano' (in honor of Milton Nascimento), 'Panalivio,' 'Toro Mata,' and 'Se me van los pies.' This concert was performed at the Palácio das Artes in Belo Horizonte, Brazil, as a part of the the 5th Encuentro of the Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics, titled Performing Heritage: Contemporary Indigenous and Community-Based Practices (http://hemisphericinstitute.org/eng/seminar/brazil2005/index.html).The concert was followed by a post-performance discussion with the audience
Interview with Drew Hayden Taylor ( visu )
3 editions published between 2005 and 2007 in English and held by 4 libraries worldwide
In December of 2007, as part of its Native Theater Festival, the Public Theater brought Native theater professionals from around the U.S. and Canada to New York City for a series of readings and discussions. The five-day festival included play readings, post-performance discussions, concerts, roundtables, and the performance of Darrell Dennis' 'Tales of and Urban Indian.' This video documents an interview with Drew Hayden Taylor, conducted by Kennetch Charlette as a part of a supplementary Native Theater Festival interview series
Interview with Jesse Cooday (Tinglit) ( Computer File )
3 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 3 libraries worldwide
In this interview, conducted by the Hemispheric Institute's Native curator Raquel Chapa, Native American artist Jesse Cooday (Tinglit) talks about his work in both the American Indian Community House (AICH) gallery -where he has assisted the gallery director- and its performing arts department, as well as his work during the late 80's, his activism in Alaska, and his work as a photographer. Cooday also reminisces about the many prominent Native artists that have come through the AICH. This interview complements the Hemispheric Institute Digital Video Library project's American Indian Community House collection. It is also featured on-line in the Hemispheric Institute's web cuaderno titled 'Native Performance in New York City at the American Indian Community House.'
El apagón The blackout ( visu )
2 editions published between 1992 and 2007 in English and held by 3 libraries worldwide
'El Apagón/The Blackout' is a bilingual theatrical adaptation of the story 'La noche que volvimos a ser gente' by José Luis González, set to the sounds of popular Latin songs from the 1950s and 1960s. Riding the subway uptown towards El Barrio, and eager to witness the birth of his firstborn, a Puerto Rican man and his best friend face the Northeast Blackout of 1965. A paean to the courage, humor, and humanity of migrant experience, the show has been hailed by critics as 'the quintessential Boricua play.' 'El Apagón' has been performed throughout the United States, and in Puerto Rico, Slovakia, and Holland. This video documents Pregones' first iteration of 'El Apagón,' as premiered at Pregones @ St. Ann's in the Spring of 1992. Founded in 1979 and based in The Bronx, New York City, Pregones Theater (http://www.pregones.org) has performed in more than 400 cities and 13 countries
Amnezac ( visu )
2 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 3 libraries worldwide
This satirical pharmaceutical commercial by Fulana was made in the context of the Iraq war and the Bush administration, at a time when being a 'good American, ' they felt, meant falling into a kind of political and historical amnesia. The 'Amnezac' commercial, much in the style of drugs like Paxil and Zoloft, asks consumers to think about their emotional state and suggest they may need clinical treatment. 'Do you feel anxiety about world events you cannot change?, ' it asks. 'Are your political concerns interfering with your patriotic activities, like shopping and paying taxes? Does the Iraq war remind you of US invasions of Latin American countries, including your own? You may be suffering from Historical Memoritis.' It urges viewers to block their long-term historical memory with Amnezac: The Most Powerful Anti-Historiamine on the Market. Fulana (www.fulana.org) is a Latina video collective from New York City. Through parody and satire, Fulana explores themes that are relevant to Latino cultures in the U.S., delving into the nuances that bind our experiences, experimenting with strategies to make visible what we're so often made to read between the lines. Their work, which consists mainly of mock television commercials, music videos and print advertisements, responds to the ways products and ideas are marketed to Latinos through the mass media
Muiraquitã a cena e as tradições Afro-Ameríndias ( visu )
1 edition published in 2009 in Portuguese and held by 3 libraries worldwide
Zeca Ligiéro is currently Associate Professor at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro State and the curator of Augusto Boal Archive. He coordinates since 1998 the Center for the Study of Afro-Amerindian Performances-NEPAA, which is dedicated to promoting research, dissemination, and exchange with various cultures of African, Indigenous, and other non-hegemonic origin, and to studying their inter-relations within Brazil
Faust/gastronome ( visu )
2 editions published in 1994 in English and held by 3 libraries worldwide
Richard Schechner's East Coast Artists bring this foundational Western myth forward to the end of the 20th century with Faust as a cook-alchemist. Food preparation and consumption is the ruling metaphor for the destructive appetites of Western expansion culminating in both the Nazi crime of genocide and the post-industrial excesses of globalization and genetic manipulation. Schechner and his colleagues rework the story. Mephistopheles played by a woman dressed as a man but not disguising her 'actual' gender is assisted by Hitler, also played by a woman. Part One of 'Faust/gastronome' draws heavily on Goethe, tracing Faust's seduction of Gretchen (aided by Mephistopheles) and his abandoning her to her death. A considerable portion of the dialogue is Goethe's, performed in German. Part Two Schechner describes as a 'tragedy of development.' Here Faust heads the 'Fist Group' of corporations involved in genetic engineering and global exploitation. Just before his death and damnation, Faust meets Gretchen who has come to seek him out and help bring him to hell. At one point, Hitler's architect, Albert Speer, appears on a talk show justifying World War II and the Holocaust. Later, Faust and a neo-Nazi teenage appear on the same show. The set features three sturdy wooden tables used in many configurations to contain the action. On a platform upstage, composer Ralph Denzer leads a small jazz ensemble. Richard Schechner is a theater director, performance theorist and university professor known for being one of the founders of the academic discipline of Performance Studies at Tisch School of the Arts, New York University. Schechner combines his work in anthropology with innovative approaches to performance of all kinds including ritual, drama, environmental theater, political rallies, dance, music, etc. in order to consider how performance can be understood not just as an object of study, but also as an active intellectual-artistic practice. He is the editor of 'TDR: The Journal of Performance Studies.' His books include 'Environmental Theater,' 'The Future of Ritual,' 'Performance Theory,' 'Between Theater and Anthropology' and 'Performance Studies: An Introduction.' As of 2007, his books have been translated into 14 languages
Three sisters by Hen's Tooth Video (Firm)( visu )
2 editions published in 1997 in English and held by 3 libraries worldwide
Rather than lock Chekhov's 'Three Sisters' into its own or any other single period, the production moves through time. The first act, performed realistically, takes place in 1901 in a provincial Russian town. The action centers around the 22nd birthday party of Irina, the youngest sister and the arrival in town of the handsome officer, Colonel Vershinin. The second act is staged in biomechanical style, as the Russian director Vsevolod Meyerhold might have done in the early 1920s, the high point of Soviet revolutionary aspirations. The stage is bare except for two benches, a couch, and a piano. The actors sing Red Army songs. The third act takes place in the 1950s in a Siberian labor camp. The prisoners enact Chekhov's play as they build walls of cinder blocks. The last act takes place in the here and now of the theater. The performers, speaking through microphones, address the audience directly
Amores pelos ( visu )
4 editions published in 2001 in Spanish and held by 3 libraries worldwide
Video documentation of Astrid Hadad's performance 'Amores Pelos' presented as a part of the 2nd Encuentro of the Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics, celebrated in June of 2001 in Monterrey, Mexico under the title 'Memory, Atrocity and Resistance'. Astrid Hadad, singer and actress, graduated from Mexico City's Centro Universitario de Teatro. She looks to cabaret and performance to represent social, cultural, and political crisis in Mexico and, at the same time, to entertain. Costumed in her signature wearable art, Hadad blends popular songs and ranchero, son and bolero music and political satire with highly theatrical precision to create a genre of music she calls 'Heavy Nopal'. Her work takes on the stereotypes of Mexican culture and reframes them to comment on the forms of machismo in a variety of local and global contexts
Hamlet by Richard Ouzounian( visu )
2 editions published in 1999 in English and held by 3 libraries worldwide
For this East Coast Artists production, Schechner largely used the 1603 First Quarto and character names derived from earlier source texts. Schechner proposes a collision of 21st century American popular culture, Elizabethan poetry, and a medieval Danish story. Using contemporary U.S. idiomatic expressions, ballroom dancing, and pop icons such as Marilyn Monroe (Gertred) and Shirley Temple (Ofelia), 'Hamlet' embodies a cyclone of tragedy enacted within the postmodernity of the 21st century. As Schechner writes in his program note, Monroe and others steal the words of Shakespeare's characters and haunt the play from the future - just as Gertrude, an ancient woman, haunts it from the past. Claudius is both a Viking pirate and a contemporary globalizing marauder, blustering and handsome. Polonius is a talking head, a TV pundit full of shopworn sagacity. Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are literally rats, their tails trailing behind them as they do tap routines
Bocas de bolero ( visu )
2 editions published in 1994 in Spanish and held by 3 libraries worldwide
'Bocas de bolero' is a collective creation by Teatro La Máscara on the relationships women have with everyday activities in the domestic realm. The melodrama of marriage, the notion of waiting, domestic chores, religion, mother-daughter relationships, gender conventions, etc., are woven with the romantic and melancholy sounds and themes of bolero. Through a polysemic treatment of space, reiteration, movement and image that explores the dynamics of memory, personal present and collective past, the performance artfully confronts the taboos, conventions and struggles surrounding cultural notions of gender. Teatro La Máscara is the oldest - and one of the only - feminist, all-womens theater in Colombia. Founded in 1972 in Cali, La Máscara was a political theater initially comprised of male as well as female actors; by the early 1980s, when only the women stayed and wanted to continue the theatrical trajectory of the group, Lucy Bolaños decided to make La Máscara a womens ensemble fully dedicated to a feminine dramaturgy on gender issues. Committed to feminism and social change, they have stayed true to this mission, despite the many social and economic pressures theyve had to endure in an environment plagued by violence and machismo, which constantly seeks to invisibilize their work. Because of their fruitful stubbornness, La Máscara is not only creating and staging plays, but also working with marginalized communities, actively participating in political protests and demonstrations, and being involved in the organization of theater festivals. Through their work, they keep re-thinking womens role in the construction of a peaceful Colombia
YokastaS redux ( visu )
3 editions published in 2005 in English and held by 3 libraries worldwide
He is the editor of 'TDR: The Journal of Performance Studies.' His books include 'Environmental Theater,' 'The Future of Ritual,' 'Performance Theory,' 'Between Theater and Anthropology' and 'Performance Studies: An Introduction.' As of 2007, his books have been translated into 14 languages
La pastorela ( visu )
1 edition published in 1995 in English and held by 3 libraries worldwide
Founded in 1965 by Luis Valdez, El Teatro Campesino was initially the cultural wing of the United Farm Workers union in California's central valley. With a pointed political mission, ETC performed their actos in the fields, agitprop improvisations communicated eloquently with the workers, who could neither read nor write, but recognized themselves and their values in the actos. By 1970 ETC had gained an international reputation, with major contributions to Chicano culture in the U.S. and to the development and expansion of the boundaries of theater everywhere. Theirs is a popular theater rooted in the American streets, early California history, Mayan/Aztec mythology and Mexican folklore and spiritualism, all geared toward expression of social, political and cultural perceptions. This video documents the piece La Pastorela, which is performed biannually by El Teatro Campesino during the Christmas holidays, alternating with La Virgen del Tepeyac, in the historic Mission of San Juan Bautista, established in 1797. Pastorelas, or Shepherds Plays, originated in medieval Europe as religious dramas and were later brought to the new world and Alta California by the Spanish missionaries. La Pastorela recreates the long trek of those first pastores to the holy site of the Nativity. This adaptation of La Pastorela was originally created in 1975, under the direction of Luis Valdez, based on a traditional version from San Luis Potosi in Mexico. The Lucifer character of Luzbel and his demons attempt to thwart the shepherds from reaching Bethlehem and the Holy Manger. However, in a dynamic clash of good against evil, San Miguel, the Archangel, and an army of angels overpower the demonic powers of Luzbel and the shepherds are at last free to complete their journey. This particular production, staged in 1995 by Kinan Valdez, is a youthful and vibrant reincarnation of this ETC popular classic
 
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Spanish (15)
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