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Hemispheric Institute Digital Video Library

Overview
Works: 611 works in 907 publications in 2 languages and 1,183 library holdings
Genres: Interviews  Documentary films  Drama  History  Art  Parodies, imitations, etc 
Classifications: HM881, 322.44
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about Hemispheric Institute Digital Video Library
Publications by Hemispheric Institute Digital Video Library
Most widely held works by Hemispheric Institute Digital Video Library
Salad of the Bad Café ( visu )
4 editions published between 1998 and 2000 in English and held by 4 libraries worldwide
Since 1981, the Split Britches Company (founded by Lois Weaver, Peggy Shaw, and Deb Margolin, www.splitbritches.com) has written and performed in trio, duet, and solo, as well as collaborated and performed with other artists. They describe their work in this way: 'Our work is rooted in popular culture, but positioned against it. It relies on moments rather than plot, relationships rather than story. It depends on the surprise of transformation rather than the logic of psychological narrative. It straddles the line between performance and theater, exploiting theatricality while exposing the pretense. It is about a community of outsiders, queers, eccentrics. It is feminist because it encourages the imaginative potential in everyone and lesbian because it takes the presence of lesbian on stage as a given.' Their vaudevillian satirical gender-bending performances have received numerous awards, including a Jane Chamber award and four Village Voice OBIE awards. Their collection of scripts, 'Split Britches Feminist Performance/Lesbian Practice', edited by Sue Ellen Case, won the 1997 Lambda Literary Award for Drama. 'Salad of the Bad Café' is a postmodern cabaret written and performed by Lois Weaver and Peggy Shaw of Split Britches and Asian American performance artist Stacy Makishi. Inspired by Carson McCullers' story 'The Ballad of the Sad Café' and the lives of Tennessee Williams and Yukio Mishima, it is a treatise on love in a post-claustrophobic era. The play begins in 1945, in the summer that lay between the war and the postwar period when Japan was weeping, the American South was seething and the word 'gender' was mostly used in grammar class. The setting is a café where people come to spend a few hours so that the 'deep bitter knowing that their life is not worth much can be laid to rest.' Racial, gender and regional stereotypes such as 'the drunken homosexual writer, the gender outlaw, the homo-erotic cowboy, the reluctant lesbian bride, the mutant refugee, the faded southern belle, the geisha and the soldier,' come together to tell a story of unrequited love, in an attempt to demystify the Queer, disorient the Orient and demythify the Southern Gothic and the American Grotesque. This is one of the most recent versions of the piece, performed in Boston in 2000
Reverend Billy and the church of stop shopping by William Talen( visu )
3 editions published between 2003 and 2007 in English and held by 4 libraries worldwide
Video documentation of Reverend Billy and his Church of Stop Shopping's performance-intervention, presented as a part of the 4th Encuentro of the Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics, celebrated in July of 2003 in New York City, United States under the title 'Spectacles of Religiosities'. Reverend Billy is a character inhabited by the author/actor William 'Bill' Talen. An invention that resists titles like Performance Artist, Man of God, or Anarchist -- Reverend Billy and his Church of Stop Shopping have become popular as none of the above or as all three. In one form, this project is an interactive play, an evening-length church service that seems to evolve from comedy to some sort of secular spirituality that downtown New York hipsters embrace. Working in 300-seat theaters with large gospel choirs that sing anti-consumerist lyrics ('Stop Shopping! Stop Shopping! Now we can leave the Shopping Malls!'), the Reverend usually works, like a normal church, with a theme at each service. These range from anti-sweatshop concerns, to the neighborhood defense against the economy of tourism, to animal rights. However, Reverend Billy is best known for his Disney and Starbucks store invasions, which also combine the elements of drama, religion and politics. Post-performance discussion led by Jill Lane
Jardín de pulpos ( visu )
4 editions published between 1992 and 1996 in Spanish and held by 4 libraries worldwide
José, a man who has lost his memory, wanders along a country that he no longer feels his own, a place that no longer holds affective ties, personal memories linking him to a community. One day he meets Toña, a woman of great kindness, alienated due to a profound lack of affection. She tells him that in a nearby beach, many years ago, people used to go to sleep and dream a collective dream and that, in this dream, theirs pasts and the characters who lived there show up once again. José, conflicted by his loss of memory decides to go to this beach to dream in order to build, out of dreams, his lost identity. 'Jardín de pulpos' ('Octopus's Garden') is a journey through memory and identity, a painful metaphor of losses and absences, a space of the subconscious where Latin America's collective imagery wanders amidst its struggles, exiles, and oblivion. This video documents key excerpts from Malayerba's renowned production. The Grupo de Teatro Malayerba (teatromalayerba.org) was founded in Quito in 1979 by Arístides Vargas, Susana Pautasso and María del Rosario 'Charo' Francés, immigrant actors originally from Argentina and Spain. From the start, Malayerba included actors with various backgrounds and nationalities, invested in the exploration of the rich cultural diversity and complex history of Ecuador, as well as issues of migration, exile, political violence and individual and collective memory. With over 25 years of ongoing theater practice and more than 20 plays performed locally and internationally for a diverse audience, Malayerba is committed to theater pedagogy and experimentation, artistic collaboration, and community building. They have represented Ecuador in national and international theater festivals; they have also collaborated with theater groups within Ecuador and in other countries, and performed for both film and television, while engaging in community work in Quito. In 1989 the group created the Laboratorio Malayerba, committed to the training of generations of young Ecuadorian actors and to an ongoing investigation of theories and practices of experimental theater. In 2001 Malayerba launched the theater journal 'Hoja de Teatro,' conceived as a forum for the theorization, criticism and dissemination of Ecuadorian theater practices. The group also runs a theater house, the Casa Malayerba, which houses the Laboratory as well as a theater with seating capacity for seventy people. Malayerba approaches theater making as an artistic, ethical and technical realm where to engage in meaningful creative experiences through which to understand, assume and confront current sociopolitical processes. In working together, actors with various backgrounds and nationalities have shown that a multicultural blend is not only possible but also enriching, as differences lead to new identities, embodiments of dreams, memories, absences and pains that are at once local and universal
Little women ( visu )
2 editions published in 1998 in English and held by 4 libraries worldwide
Since 1981, the Split Britches Company (founded by Lois Weaver, Peggy Shaw, and Deb Margolin) has written and performed in trio, duet, and solo, as well as collaborated and performed with other artists. They describe their work in this way: 'Our work is rooted in popular culture, but positioned against it. It relies on moments rather than plot, relationships rather than story. It depends on the surprise of transformation rather than the logic of psychological narrative. It straddles the line between performance and theater, exploiting theatricality while exposing the pretense. It is about a community of outsiders, queers, eccentrics. It is feminist because it encourages the imaginative potential in everyone and lesbian because it takes the presence of lesbian on stage as a given.' Their vaudevillian satirical gender-bending performances have received numerous awards, including a Jane Chamber award and four Village Voice OBIE awards. This video documents the first version of their show Little Women: The Tragedy. Here performed as a work-in-progress, the piece tackles complex issues of pornography and feminism through the humor of only two possibilities: heaven or hell, preacher or prostitute, and the left hand and right hand of Louisa May Alcott
Susana Baca in concert ( visu )
2 editions published between 2003 and 2005 in Spanish and held by 4 libraries worldwide
Video documentation of Susana Baca's concert, presented as a part of the 4th Encuentro of the Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics, celebrated in July of 2003 in New York City, United States under the title 'Spectacles of Religiosities'. Susana Baca is the foremost singer of Afro-Peruvian music. Her music, distributed by Luaka Bop record label, has promoted an awareness of the many cultural contributions of African-Peruvians. Also, to this aim, in 1992 Susana and her husband Ricardo Pereira founded the Instituto NegroContinuo in Lima to teach and preserve the dance and music of her ancestors. Susana Baca won a Grammy Award in 2002
Donde el viento hace buñuelos ( visu )
2 editions published in 2004 in Spanish and held by 4 libraries worldwide
'Donde el viento hace buñuelos' crystallizes an ongoing artistic collaboration Teatro Malayerba (Ecuador) and Rosa Luisa Márquez (Puerto Rico), produced under the name Suda-k-ribe. Collaboratively created through improvisations by actresses María del Rosario 'Charo' Francés and Rosa Luisa Márquez, the directorial and dramaturgical vision of Arístides Vargas, and the visual and spatial transformations by Puerto Rican artist Antonio Martorell, the play portrays the close relationship between two friends, developed in multiple encounters through time and space in the slippery territory of memory. The characters share the encounters and disencounters experienced while living in countries traversed by borders, incommunication, censorship, indifference and violence
Interview with Santiago García ( visu )
3 editions published between 1999 and 2009 in Spanish and held by 4 libraries worldwide
Three-session interview with Santiago García, theater director, theorist, playwright, and founder of renowned Colombian theater ensemble Teatro La Candelaria (www.teatrolacandelaria.org.co), conducted by Chicano theater scholar Alma Martinez. In this extensive interview, García discusses key topics germane to his artistic work, narrating his first experiences in theater, the artistic trajectory of La Candelaria (founded in 1966, and still one of the most important theater groups in Latin America), and his personal take on popular theater, collective creation, the influence of Brechtian theories in his artistic work, the role of the director in collaborative artistic collectives, and the state of the scenic arts in Colombia in the context of economic and political crisis. Santiago also comments on the influences and points of contact between Latin American and Latino theaters based on his personal experiences traveling and working with different theater groups, including the Chicano theater ensemble El Teatro Campesino; under the rubric of the 'popular', García analyzes the artistic affinities and ideological choices present in collective creation across the Americas. Finally, the artist shares his thoughts on La Candelaria's rendition of 'El Quijote', based on García's personal adaptation of this literary masterpiece. A carnivalesque mixture of cultures and traditions, this play highlights shared traits between the Spanish novel and Colombian culture, while performing a commentary on illusions, fantasy and utopia, elements that the author finds absent in present-day Colombia
The temple of confessions ( visu )
4 editions published in 1996 in English and held by 4 libraries worldwide
This itinerant performance/installation present two 'end-of-the-century saints' from an 'unknown border religion', in search of sanctuary across the United States while gathering confessions on intercultural fears and desires. Designed as a theater of mythos and cultural pathologies, the 'Temple' proposes a ceremonial space for the reflection on ethnic, racial, and gender prejudices. It is divided in three main areas: the 'Chapel of Desires', displaying 'El Pre-Columbian Vato' or 'holy gang member' (performed by Roberto Sifuentes); the 'Chapel of Fears', displaying 'San Pocho Aztlaneca' (a 'hyper-exoticied curio shop shaman for spiritual tourists' performed by Guillermo Gómez-Peña); and an enigmatic funerary vignette composed by performance objects. Paintings of other 'hybrid santos' hang from the walls, two 'nuns' ('chola/nun' Norma Medina and 'dominatrix nun' Michelle Ceballos) take care of the temple, and visitors can leave their 'confessions'; the most revealing ones are incorporated into the installation soundtrack for future performances. La Pocha Nostra (www.pochanostra.com) is an ever-morphing trans-disciplinary arts organization, founded in 1993 by Guillermo Gómez-Peña, Roberto Sifuentes, and Nola Mariano in California. The objective was to formally conceptualize Gómez-Peña's collaborations with other performance artists. It provides a base (and forum) for a loose network of rebel artists from various disciplines, generations and ethnic backgrounds, whose common denominator is the desire to cross and erase dangerous borders between art and politics, practice and theory, artist and spectator. As of June 2006, members include performance artists Guillermo Gómez-Peña, Violeta Luna, Michelle Ceballos, and Roberto Sifuentes; curators Gabriela Salgado and Orlando Britto; and over thirty associates worldwide in countries such as Mexico, Spain, the UK, and Australia. Projects range from performance solos and duets to large-scale performance installations including video, photography, audio, and cyber-art. La Pocha collaborates across national borders, race, gender and generations. Their collaborative model functions both as an act of citizen diplomacy and as a means to create ephemeral communities of like-minded rebels. The basic premise of these collaborations is founded on an ideal: If we learn to cross borders on stage, we may learn how to do so in larger social spheres. La Pocha strives to eradicate myths of purity and dissolve borders surrounding culture, ethnicity, gender, language, and métier. These are radical acts
El bolero fue mi ruina. The bolero was my ruin ( visu )
3 editions published between 2001 and 2006 in Spanish and English and held by 4 libraries worldwide
Video documentation of Pregones Theaters performance El bolero fue mi ruina (The Bolero Was My Ruin) presented as a part of the 2nd Encuentro of the Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics, celebrated in June of 2001 in Monterrey, Mexico under the title Memory, Atrocity and Resistance. El bolero fue mi ruina is Pregones Theaters adaptation of Manuel Ramos Oteros story Loca la de la locura. The protagonist is a Puerto Rican woman like any other and unlike them all. She is a lovelorn and timeworn artiste, a singer of torch songs, a faded night club entertainer. She is a convicted murderer serving the last days of her sentence at Oso Blanco penitentiary. She is also, biologically speaking, a male. The writer dispenses with pieties on this issue Locas biology is not a scandal but a fact. Loca disputes the notion that an aging male body is no home for a lady. She is vulgar, sentimental, sweet, and always sharp as a tack. She remains loyal to the memory of her beloved Nene Lindo, his brand of tough love, and his inscrutable beauty. Her crime binds them forever in shame and passion. Pregones Theater (http://www.pregones.org). , founded in 1979 in New York City, is dedicated to creating innovative and challenging theater rooted in Puerto Rican traditions and popular artistic expressions. They have performed in 21 states as well as internationally. Recent awards are: 1998 Julia de Burgos Cultural Award; 1996 Bronx Council on the Arts Award; Three 1994 ACE Awards (critic Award) for Best Production and Best Supporting Actors; 1992 City of New York Mayor's Award for Arts and Culture. Jorge B. Merced is an Associate Artistic Director of Pregones Theater and has been a member of the company since 1987. As one of Pregones' principal artists, Jorge has performed in over 30 productions, directed and co-directed several major company productions, and coordinated all specialized workshops and master classes. Jorge is also creator and director of several projects such as Asunción (a Latino playwright's laboratory exploring issues of difference and transformation at the limits of queer identity), The Embrace AIDS Theater Project, and all company Theater & Education projects. Alvan Colón Lespier is an Associate Artistic Director of Pregones Theater, joining the company in 1981. He is the producer for the company's national and international Touring and Residencies Program, the Visiting Artists Series, Conversations on Culture at Pregones Studio and Pregones Summer Stage. Articles and essays by Alvan have appeared in Revista Conjunto, Reimaging America - Arts for Social Change, The Non-Traditional Casting Project, Ollantay Theater Magazine and Aplauso -Hispanic Children's Theater
Phobophilia, arousal from fear Phobophilia, excitación a partir del miedo ( visu )
2 editions published in 2009 in English and held by 4 libraries worldwide
'Phobophilia, arousal from fear,' by Stephen Lawson and Aaron Pollard of 2boys.tv, was presented as a part of the 7th Encuentro of the Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics, held in August of 2009 in Bogotá, Colombia, under the title 'Staging Citizenship: Cultural Rights in the Americas.' This 10-day event brought together activism, scholarship, and art around the themes of legacies, memories, struggles, and frontiers of citizenship. In this performance, a small number of spectators are blindfolded and led to a secret location to witness a peculiar interrogation. 'Phobophilia' poses the question: What is the role of the poet in an age characterized by fear? The performance, inspired by the life and art of Jean Cocteau, explores the relationship between artist and audience, and the negotiations established upon a sensation of fear that can be mesmerizing. This negotation also exists within the artistic practice: the performer's physical body interacts with a video projection of himself - a miniature that is both vulnerable and powerful. 2boys.tv is a transdisciplinary duo from Montreal, Canada composed by Stephen Lawson and Aaron Pollard (also notoriously known in some circles as alter egos Gigi L'Amour and Pipi Douleur). They have created a wide repertoire of epic multimedia cabaret works, performances, videos, and installations
Upwardly mobile home ( visu )
3 editions published between 1984 and 1986 in English and held by 4 libraries worldwide
Since 1981, the Split Britches Company (founded by Lois Weaver, Peggy Shaw, and Deb Margolin) has written and performed in trio, duet, and solo, as well as collaborated and performed with other artists. They describe their work in this way: 'Our work is rooted in popular culture, but positioned against it. It relies on moments rather than plot, relationships rather than story. It depends on the surprise of transformation rather than the logic of psychological narrative. It straddles the line between performance and theater, exploiting theatricality while exposing the pretense. It is about a community of outsiders, queers, eccentrics. It is feminist because it encourages the imaginative potential in everyone and lesbian because it takes the presence of lesbian on stage as a given.' Their vaudevillian satirical gender-bending performances have received numerous awards, including a Jane Chamber award and four Village Voice OBIE awards. This video documents the first version of their show Upwardly Mobile Home, performed at WOW Café on East 11th Street in New York City. The piece is a working class survival story, where a troupe of actors camps out under the Brooklyn bridge and peddle their wares, trying unsuccessfully to 'sell out' and 'be greedy' like the rest of America in the 1980s
Split britches ( visu )
2 editions published between 1980 and 1984 in English and held by 4 libraries worldwide
Since 1981, the Split Britches Company (founded by Lois Weaver, Peggy Shaw, and Deb Margolin, www.splitbritches.com) has written and performed in trio, duet, and solo, as well as collaborated and performed with other artists. They describe their work in this way: 'Our work is rooted in popular culture, but positioned against it. It relies on moments rather than plot, relationships rather than story. It depends on the surprise of transformation rather than the logic of psychological narrative. It straddles the line between performance and theater, exploiting theatricality while exposing the pretense. It is about a community of outsiders, queers, eccentrics. It is feminist because it encourages the imaginative potential in everyone and lesbian because it takes the presence of lesbian on stage as a given.' Their vaudevillian satirical gender-bending performances have received numerous awards, including a Jane Chamber award and four Village Voice OBIE awards. Their collection of scripts, Split Britches Feminist Performance/Lesbian Practice, edited by Sue Ellen Case, won the 1997 Lambda Literary Award for Drama. This video documents a first rehearsal of the first draft of their show Split Britches- The True Story, which marks the initial collaboration of the trio and is the show from which they got their name. Conceived and directed by Lois Weaver, its a show based on true stories of three members of Weavers family in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia, United States. It also marks the beginning of the companys aesthetic: weaving multiple true stories in one, trusting the details of the everyday and relying on relation rather than action.The Christian Science Monitor called this play a tiny masterpiece
Interview with Diamela Eltit ( visu )
2 editions published between 2007 and 2011 in Spanish and held by 4 libraries worldwide
Interview with Diamela Eltit, conducted by Carmen Oquendo-Villar as a part of the 6th Encuentro of the Hemispheric Institute of Performance and Politics, celebrated in June of 2007 in Buenos Aires, Argentina under the title 'CORPOLÍTICAS en las Américas: Formaciones de Raza, Clase y Género / Body Politics in the Americas: Formations of Race, Class and Gender' (http://hemi.nyu.edu/eng/seminar/2007/index.html). Diamela Eltit is a Chilean writer. She studied literature at the Universidad Católica de Chile and at the Universidad de Chile. She is founding member of the interdisciplinary group CADA
Interview with Drew Hayden Taylor ( visu )
3 editions published between 2005 and 2007 in English and held by 4 libraries worldwide
Drew Hayden Taylor has done everything from performing stand up comedy at the Kennedy Center in Washington D.C. to lecturing on the films of Sherman Alexie at the British Museum in England. He is an award winning playwright (with over 70 productions of his work), documentary film maker, script writer, journalist and essayist. With 18 books to his credit, Drew also enjoys writing a humor column for five Canadian newspapers. Curve Lake Reserve (Ojibway) is where he was born and currently lives. Kennetch Charlette is from Sandy Bay Saskatchewan, Canada. He is of the Cree Nation. Kennetch has been working for many years as an actor and director. He is the Founding Artistic Director of the Saskatchewan Native Theatre Company (SNTC). Recent credits include the many shows at SNTC and also directing Drew Hayden Taylor's 'In World Created by a Drunken God' at the Persephone Theatre in Sakatchewan and Taylor's 'Buzz Gem Blues' at Trinity Rep in Providence, Rhode Island
Museo de la identidad fetich-izada : Pocha Nostra workshop ( visu )
3 editions published in 2003 in English and held by 4 libraries worldwide
Unedited documentation of a Pocha Nostra interactive performance in the Museo del Chopo, Mexico City. After an intensive workshop with 15 local performance/visual artists, curators, DJ's and musicians, the troupe performs an 'experimental curiosity cabinet', a sort of living museum where participants exhibit constructed 'hybrid personas' based on their own complex identities and personal sense of race and gender. These 'cultural especimens' compose a diorama of fetishized identities, addressing issues of appropriation of hybridity by corporate multiculturalism. La Pocha Nostra (www.pochanostra.com) is an ever-morphing trans-disciplinary arts organization, founded in 1993 by Guillermo Gómez-Peña, Roberto Sifuentes, and Nola Mariano in California. The objective was to formally conceptualize Gómez-Peña's collaborations with other performance artists. It provides a base (and forum) for a loose network of rebel artists from various disciplines, generations and ethnic backgrounds, whose common denominator is the desire to cross and erase dangerous borders between art and politics, practice and theory, artist and spectator. As of June 2006, members include performance artists Guillermo Gómez-Peña, Violeta Luna, Michelle Ceballos, and Roberto Sifuentes; curators Gabriela Salgado and Orlando Britto; and over thirty associates worldwide in countries such as Mexico, Spain, the UK, and Australia. Projects range from performance solos and duets to large-scale performance installations including video, photography, audio, and cyber-art. La Pocha collaborates across national borders, race, gender and generations. Their collaborative model functions both as an act of citizen diplomacy and as a means to create ephemeral communities of like-minded rebels. The basic premise of these collaborations is founded on an ideal: If we learn to cross borders on stage, we may learn how to do so in larger social spheres. La Pocha strives to eradicate myths of purity and dissolve borders surrounding culture, ethnicity, gender, language, and métier. These are radical acts
Beauty and the beast ( visu )
2 editions published between 1983 and 1986 in English and held by 4 libraries worldwide
Since 1981, the Split Britches Company (founded by Lois Weaver, Peggy Shaw, and Deb Margolin, www.splitbritches.com) has written and performed in trio, duet, and solo, as well as collaborated and performed with other artists. They describe their work in this way: 'Our work is rooted in popular culture, but positioned against it. It relies on moments rather than plot, relationships rather than story. It depends on the surprise of transformation rather than the logic of psychological narrative. It straddles the line between performance and theater, exploiting theatricality while exposing the pretense. It is about a community of outsiders, queers, eccentrics. It is feminist because it encourages the imaginative potential in everyone and lesbian because it takes the presence of lesbian on stage as a given.' Their vaudevillian satirical gender-bending performances have received numerous awards, including a Jane Chamber award and four Village Voice OBIE awards. Their collection of scripts, Split Britches Feminist Performance/Lesbian Practice, edited by Sue Ellen Case, won the 1997 Lambda Literary Award for Drama. This video documents the first version of their show Beauty and the Beast. Based on the classic fairy tale, influenced by the long rule of republican politics and informed by the Christian agenda that dominates the US scene up till the present, it is the personal journey of a Salvation Army woman who plays the good and beautiful daughter who secretly wants to be bad, a Rabbi in pink toe shoes who is relegated to the role of the father and longs to be a stand-up comic, and an 86-year-old lesbian vaudeville freak who embraces the role of the Beast and comments on politics by forgetting which play she is in
Big mother el gran desmadre ( visu )
3 editions published in 2002 in Spanish and held by 4 libraries worldwide
The kaleidoscopic play of gazes is thus multiplied, in a vortex of surveillance where Big Mother echoes Big Brother, both as Orson Well's '1984' dystopia and as Mexico's homonymous reality TV show. Metaphysically aggravated, the Horsewomen murder Mother Nature and, left with a barren planet, embark in 'a crusade against alien -extraterrestrial- terrorism.' Mexican director, actress, playwright, performance artist, scenographer, entrepreneur, and social activist Jesusa Rodríguez has been called the most important woman of Mexico. Often referred to as a 'chameleon,' Rodríguez moves seemingly effortlessly and with vigor across the spectrum of cultural forms, styles, and tones. Her 'espectáculos' (as both spectacles and shows) challenge traditional classification, crossing with ease generic boundaries: from elite to popular to mass, from Greek tragedy to cabaret, from pre-Columbian indigenous to opera, from revue, sketch and 'carpa,' to performative acts within political projects
NY ground under ( visu )
4 editions published between 1194 and 1995 in English and held by 4 libraries worldwide
Video documentation of Circus Amoks show, NY: Ground Under, performed in 1994 in diverse NYC parks, squares and other public spaces. The piece revolves around political, social and economic issues at play in NYC, posing a critique of the disconnect between the needs of the diverse, multitudinous population of NY vis-à-vis oppressive governmental policies impacting the city. The skits highlight the ethnic diversity of its population, while alluding to controversial budget cuts and public transportation campaigns, ineffective bureaucracy, oppressive policies regarding minorities, the pervasive presence of police forces in the public sphere, and issues of public health and environmental concerns related to waste management policies. Exposing controversial policies while educating and entertaining the audience, this piece is a call for civic action framed in a joyful extravaganza of acrobatic artistry, satiric skill, and good old-fashioned circus fun. Circus Amok is a New York City based circus-theater company whose mission is to provide free public art addressing contemporary issues of social justice to the people of New York City. Directed and founded by Jennifer Miller, the group has been together since 1989 bringing its funny, queer, caustic and sexy, political one-ring spectacles to diverse neighborhoods throughout the city. Over the years the traditional circus skills - tight rope walking, juggling, acrobatics, stilt walking, clowning - have been combined with experimental dance, lifesize puppetry, music old and new, and gender-bending performance art and improvisational techniques, creating new meanings for circus while continuing to entertain the crowds of all ages throughout the city streets, gardens, parks, and playgrounds, inviting the audience to join them in envisioning a more empowered life of community interaction while enjoying a queer celebratory spectacle
Chicomoztoc-mimixcoa cloud serpents (work-in-progress, 1996) ( visu )
4 editions published between 1996 and 2000 in English and held by 4 libraries worldwide
Coatlicue Theater's 'Chicomoztoc-mimixcoa - Cloud Serpents,' was first performed as a work in progress in 1996 at the New World Theater in Amherst, MA as part of a summer program titled 'New Works for a New World.' Elvira and Hortencia Colorado explain the piece as being 'a journey through dreams, stories, time and memory, across mountains and deserts, retracing the footsteps of the ancestors, traveling back to Chicomoztoc (the place of our origin), searching, digging up and gathering stories that have been buried through centuries of shame and denial in our family, but which connect us to our past and identity. Some stories/secrets remain buried, and they are also part of who we are. We honor all those who struggled with their shame and denial. This is an offering to all of our relations.' Elvira and Hortencia Colorado, Chichimec Otomi storytellers, playwrights, performers and community activists are founding members of Coatlicue Theatre Company (www.coatlicue.com). They are also members of Danza Mexica Cetiliztli, New York Zapatistas and the American Indian Community House. The company's plays address social, political, cultural and identity issues that impact their lives and their community. Their work is based on stories they weave together which educate as well as entertain, while reaffirming their survival as urban Native American women. They have conducted storytelling/ theatre workshops. They are recipients of the Ingrid Washinawatok Community Activism Award. The American Indian Community House (AICH) is an urban Indian center that services the needs of the Native people living in New York City and welcomes Native visitors to the city. AICH was founded in 1969 and has become a de facto 'neighborhood' serving as a meeting place for the diverse Native community of the New York City area. The Community House offers a variety of services ranging from substance abuse and HIV counseling, to career assistance. It is also home to the only Indian owned and operated art gallery in New York City. The AICH's Performing Arts Department has become an important resource for Native visual and performance artists. Through its programming, performance has become an important educational vehicle, both for the Native and non-Native NY community. The Badger's Corner, initiated in the 1980's, is an education-via-entertainment vehicle for the AICH's visual and performing arts department programs. Taking its name from the Pueblo legend of the four-legged creature who led the Pueblo people out of the underworld after the great flood, the intent of its programming is to inform and challenge people to rethink their concept(s) of Native American people and customs. All performances at AICH are presented under the auspices of the Badger's Corner
Latino plastic cover Spanish version ( visu )
4 editions published in 2000 in Spanish and English and held by 4 libraries worldwide
'Latino Plastic Cover' is the first short film by Fulana (www.fulana.org), a Latina video collective from New York City. Through parody and satire, Fulana explores themes that are relevant to Latino cultures in the U.S., delving into the nuances that bind our experiences, experimenting with strategies to make visible what we're so often made to read between the lines. Their work, which consists mainly of mock television commercials, music videos and print advertisements, responds to the ways products and ideas are marketed to Latinos through the mass media. 'Latino Plastic Cover' is a mock cable access commercial for the ultimate panacea, guaranteed not only to keep dust off your furniture, but to solve all kinds of social ills affecting the Latino community and beyond. Discover the luxury of freedom!
 
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