skip to content

Leigh, Andrew

Overview
Works: 2 works in 2 publications in 1 language and 2 library holdings
Publication Timeline
Key
Publications about Andrew Leigh
Publications by Andrew Leigh
Most widely held works by Andrew Leigh
How Partisan is the Press? Multiple Measures of Media Slant by Joshua Gans( file )
1 edition published in 2011 in German and held by 1 library worldwide
We employ several different approaches to estimate the political position of Australian media outlets, relative to federal parliamentarians. First, we use parliamentary mentions to code over 100 public intellectuals on a left-right scale. We then estimate slant by using the number of mentions that each public intellectual receives in each media outlet. Second, we have independent raters separately code front-page election stories and headlines. Third, we tabulate the number of electoral endorsements that newspapers give to each side of politics in federal elections. Overall, we find that the Australian media are quite centrist, with very few outlets being statistically distinguishable from the middle of Australian politics. It is possible that this is due to the lack of competition in the Australian media market. To the extent that we can separate content slant from editorial slant, we find some evidence that editors are more partisan than journalists
Bargaining Over Labor Do Patients Have Any Power? by Joshua Gans( file )
1 edition published in 2011 in German and held by 1 library worldwide
We provide a new method of identifying the level of relative bargaining power in bilateral negotiations using exogenous variation in the degree of conflict between parties. Using daily births data, we study negotiations over birth timing. In doing so, we exploit the fact that fewer children are born on the "inauspicious" dates of February 29 and April 1; most likely, we argue, reflecting parental preferences. When these inauspicious dates abut a weekend, this creates a potential conflict between avoiding the inauspicious date (the parents' likely preference), and avoiding the weekend (the doctor's likely preference). Using daily births data, we estimate how often this conflict is resolved in favor of the physician. We show how this provides an estimate of how bargaining power is distributed between patients and physicians
 
Languages
German (2)
Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.