WorldCat Identities

Considine, Julie

Overview
Works: 19 works in 24 publications in 1 language and 158 library holdings
Genres: Handbooks and manuals  Cross-cultural studies 
Roles: Editor, Author, Other, Contributor
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Julie Considine
Emergency and trauma care for nurses and paramedics by Kate Curtis( Book )

5 editions published in 2019 in English and held by 120 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

« Led by an expanded editorial team of internationally recognised clinicians, researchers and leaders in emergency care, the 3rd edition of Emergency and Trauma Care for Nurses and Paramedics continues to be the foremost resource for students preparing to enter the emergency environment and for clinicians seeking a greater understanding of multidisciplinary emergency care
Evidence-based clinical guidelines in emergency care : a pilot study : Emergency Department, Dandenong Hospital : report to the Department of Human Services by Kerry Hood( Book )

1 edition published in 2000 in English and held by 9 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Clinical nurse educator project : emergency department, Dandenong Hospital by Julie Considine( Book )

2 editions published between 1998 and 1999 in English and held by 8 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Development of a Management Algorithm for Post-operative Pain (MAPP) after total knee and total hip replacement: study rationale and design by Mari Botti( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Testing a systematic approach to identify and prioritise barriers to successful implementation of a complex healthcare intervention by Louise E Craig( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Triage, treatment and transfer of patients with stroke in emergency department trial (the T3 Trial): a cluster randomised trial protocol by On behalf of the T3 Trialist Collaborators( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Factors associated with unplanned readmissions within 1 day of acute care discharge: a retrospective cohort study by Julie Considine( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 2 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Chemical, biological and radiological incidents : preparedness and perceptions of emergency nurses by Julie Considine( )

1 edition published in 2009 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Emergency department utilisation among older people with acute and/or chronic conditions: A multi-centre retrospective study( )

1 edition published in 2018 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Highlights: Older persons with acute illnesses are likely to be admitted than those with chronic conditions. Older persons with chronic conditions present less frequently and have higher discharge rates. Patients with acute conditions present frequently, receive higher triage categories and have higher admission rates. Abstract: Introduction: Older persons aged over 65 years represent up to 41% of Australian Emergency Department (ED) presentations. Older persons present with acute and/or chronic conditions, have more Emergency Department visits, hospital admissions and readmissions than other age groups. However, little is known about the characteristics and trends of acute illness and chronic presentations and whether frailty changes these dimensions within this cohort. Methods: A 12-month retrospective medical record audit of persons over 65 years presenting to four EDs. Results: Data from 44, 774 (26.6%) patients aged 65 years and over were analysed. Patients with acute conditions presented more frequently (n = 30, 373; 67.8%), received more urgent triage categories (n = 13, 471; 30.1%) and had higher admission rates (n = 18, 332; 61%). Chronic conditions presented less frequently (n = 14, 396; 32.1%) and had higher discharge rates (n = 9302; 65%). Patients over 80 years were allocated more urgent triage categories and commonly presented with falls (n = 3814; 8.5%). Patients between 65 and 79 years had a higher discharge rate (n = 10, 397; 46.1%). Conclusion: Older persons with acute illnesses were more likely to be admitted than those with chronic conditions and who were more likely to be discharged home. There is scope for further investigation of new models of care to better manage older persons with chronic conditions and ED discharge practices
Patient physiological status at the emergency department-ward interface and emergency calls for clinical deterioration during early hospital admission( )

1 edition published in 2016 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract: Aims: To examine the relationship between physiological status at the emergency department-ward interface and emergency calls (medical emergency team or cardiac arrest team activation) during the first 72 hours of hospital admission. Background: Ward adverse events are related to abnormal physiology in emergency department however the relationship between physiology at the emergency department-ward interface and ward adverse events is unknown. Design: Descriptive and exploratory design. Methods: The study involved 1980 patients at three hospitals in Melbourne Australia: i) 660 randomly selected adults admitted via the emergency department to medical or surgical wards during 2012 and who had an emergency call; and ii) 1320 adults without emergency calls matched for gender, triage category, usual residence, admitting unit and age. Results/findings: The median age was 78 years and 48·8% were males. The median time to the first emergency call was 18·8 hours and ≥1 abnormal parameters were documented in 34·9% of patients during the last hour of ED care and 47·1% of patients during first hour of ward care. Emergency calls were significantly more common in patients with heart rate and conscious state abnormalities during the last hour of emergency care and abnormal oxygen saturation, heart rate or respiratory rate during the first hour of ward care. Medical emergency team afferent limb failure occurred in 55·3% patients with medical emergency team activation criteria during first hour of ward care. Conclusion: The use of physiological status at the emergency department-ward interface to guide care planning and reasons for and outcomes of medical emergency team afferent limb failure are important areas for future research
Nurses' occupational physical activity levels: A systematic review( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract: Background: Nurses' physical performance at work has implications both for nurses' occupational health and patient care. Although nurses are the largest healthcare workforce, are present 24-hours a day, and engage in many physically demanding tasks, nurses' occupational physical activity levels are poorly understood. Objectives: The aim of this systematic review was to examine nurses' occupational physical activity levels, and explore how nurses accumulate their physical activity during a shift. Design: This narrative systematic review was guided by the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analysis (PRISMA) Statement. Data sources: EBSCOHost (MEDLINE, CINAHL, Age Line, Academic Search Complete, Global Health, Health Business Centre, Health Policy Reference Centre, Health Source (Consumer and Nursing/Academic Edition) and SPORTDiscus), Embase, Informit, ProQuest Health and Medical, Science Direct, Scopus, and Web of Science databases. Review methods: A systematic search of seven databases were completed to locate peer-reviewed journal articles documenting nurses' occupational physical activity levels from January 1990. Papers were included if they were original research papers; measured physical activity objectively and/or subjectively; reported nurses' occupational physical activity; and were published in English. Articles were excluded if nurses' data were not reported separately from other professional groups. Two researchers independently screened the articles, extracted data, and undertook the methodological quality assessments. Results: Fifteen studies met the inclusion criteria. Nursing work predominantly comprised of light-intensity physical activity. In nine studies how nurses' accumulated occupational physical activity were documented and showed that the majority of a nurses' shift was spent standing or walking whilst completing direct patient care tasks. However, the definition of the nursing populations studied were often poorly reported, and few researchers reported the validity and the reliability of the measurement tools used. Conclusions: Nurses' occupational physical activity levels largely consist of light-intensity physical activity interspersed with moderate-intensity tasks. It is not known whether physical activity during one shift affects the activity levels in the following shift. This systematic review is the first step towards understanding the physical demands of nursing work, and how nurses' physical activity may impact workplace wellbeing and patient safety. Limitations: A meta-analysis was not possible due to the variability in how physical activity outcomes were presented. Several studies had heart rate outcomes that were converted, where possible, by the authors into physical activity outcomes. Registration: This systematic review is registered with PROSPERO; Registration number: CRD42016045427
The Australasian Triage Scale : examining emergency department nurses' performance using computer and paper scenarios by Julie Considine( )

1 edition published in 2004 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

A framework for transition to specialty practice programmes( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Abstract: Aim: To develop a framework for emergency nursing transition to specialty practice programmes. Background: Transition to Specialty Practice programmes were introduced to fill workforce shortages and facilitate the transition of nurses to specialty nursing practice. These programmes are recognized as an essential preparation for emergency nurses. Emergency nursing Transition to Specialty Practice programmes have developed in an ad hoc manner and as a result, programme characteristics vary. Variability in programme characteristics may result in inconsistent preparation of emergency nurses. Design: Donabedian's Structure-Process-Outcome model was used to integrate results of an Australian study of emergency nursing Transition to Specialty Practice programmes with key education, nursing practice and safety and quality standards to develop the Transition to Specialty Practice (Emergency Nursing) Framework. Methods: An explanatory sequential design was used. Data were collected from 118 emergency departments over 10 months in 2013 using surveys. Thirteen interviews were also conducted. Comparisons were made using Mann-Whitney U, Kruskal-Wallis and Chi-square tests. Qualitative data were analysed using content analysis. Results: Transition to Specialty Practice programmes were offered in 80 (72·1%) emergency departments surveyed, to improve safe delivery of patient care. Better professional development outcomes were achieved in emergency departments which employed participants in small groups (Median = 4 participants) and offered programmes of 6 months duration. Written assessments were significantly associated with articulation to postgraduate study (Chi-square Fisher's exact P = <0·001). Conclusion: The Transition to Specialty Practice (Emergency Nursing) Framework has been developed based on best available evidence to enable a standardized approach to the preparation of novice emergency nurses
Emergency and Trauma Care for Nurses and Paramedics - eBook by Kate Curtis( )

1 edition published in 2019 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Nursing, cultural diversity and politics of health care by Elizabeth Bethune( Book )

1 edition published in 2011 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Produced for postgraduate unit HNN746 (Nursing, cultural diversity and politics of health care) offered by the Faculty of Health, Medicine, Nursing and Behavioural Sciences' School of Nursing and Midwifery in Deakin University's Flexible Learning Program
Evidence-based clinical guidelines in emergency care : a pilot study, Emergency Department, Dandenong Hospital 2000 by Kerry Hood( Book )

1 edition published in 2000 in English and held by 0 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

 
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Emergency and trauma care for nurses and paramedics
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English (24)