WorldCat Identities

Okonkwo, Christopher N.

Overview
Works: 6 works in 9 publications in 1 language and 265 library holdings
Genres: Criticism, interpretation, etc  Academic theses 
Roles: Author, Thesis advisor
Classifications: PS153.N5, 813.540915
Publication Timeline
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Most widely held works by Christopher N Okonkwo
A spirit of dialogue : incarnations of Ợgbañje, the born-to-die, in African American literature by Christopher N Okonkwo( Book )

4 editions published in 2008 in English and held by 258 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

"A groundbreaking study, A Spirit of Dialogue examines through extensive, interdisciplinary research, theory, and close reading the intricate reconstructions, extensions, and resonances of the West African myth of spirit children, the "Born-to-Die," in contemporary African American neo-slave narratives. Arguing that the myth, called "Ogbanje" in Igbo language and "abiku" in Yoruba, has had over thirty years of uncharted presence in African American literature, Okonkwo advances a compelling case absent in extant scholarship."--Jacket
The spirit-child as idiom : reading Ogbanje dialogic as a platform of conversation among four black women's novels by Christopher N Okonkwo( )

1 edition published in 2001 in English and held by 3 WorldCat member libraries worldwide

Women beyond allegory : public land, private space and political participation in three African novels by Katelyn Harlin( )

1 edition published in 2015 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

This work explores the intersections of gendered pain, domestic spaces, and political participation in three novels from different African nations in moments of post-colonial or anti-colonial political upheaval
Abjection and order : the grotesque aesthetic in Octavia Butler's Wild Seed and Dawn, and Gloria Naylor's Linden Hills by Daniel Thater( )

1 edition published in 2017 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

Octavia Butler's Wild Seed and Dawn, and Gloria Naylor's Linden Hills are three novels that expose the abjection of their black, maternal protagonists that is enacted by their rulers, masters, and patriarchs. This abjection renders the female protagonists as not wholly human. The grotesque, as I am using it, is the blurring of the category of the human and, by rendering these women grotesque, the patriarchal figures of the novel attempt to establish a stable social order that is founded on the control of the bodies of these black females. I use Kristeva, Foucault, and Wynter to provide a language of the grotesque with which to approach these texts. Ultimately, the abjection of the black female protagonists exposes histories of slavery and the use of black female for childrearing and child-bearing machines. When considering the texts together, the authors bring to light a past history of abjection that is rooted in slavery and colonialism (Wild Seed), a contemporary look at the dependence on black female bodies (Linden Hills), and a projection into the future that locates race and gender alongside a discussion of speciesism (Dawn). I want to argue that these authors situate the abjection of their female protagonists as an artificially imposed category and one that is directly connected to the maintaining of the social order within the novels
The space of the south and self-definition in African American return migration novels of the post-civil rights era by Shelli Elizabeth Homer( )

1 edition published in 2014 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

My dissertation examines the representation of the return migration in African American novels across the last five decades and argues that these return migration novels are distinct from earlier migration narratives and, as such, do not fit within the available critical frameworks developed from Great Migration literature. Historically, the return migration occurred throughout the south-to-north Great Migration, but the literature does not present the possibility of a successful return to the South until the mid-1970s, which is where my project begins. My critical approach brings together W.E.B. Du Bois's theory of double consciousness and theories of place in order to understand the importance of the region of the South in contemporary African American literature. The American South remains a fluid and ambiguous space both geographically and metaphorically. I attempt to balance the significance of place in the novels with the relationships between the community and the individual. Although literary scholars have noted a shift in the treatment of the South in African American literature beginning in the mid-1970s, they have not thoroughly accounted for that shift beyond their general interest in the representation of the South as a space of healing enabled by the presence of the ancestor. I argue that the significance of the South in African American return migration novels of the post-Civil Rights era goes beyond its function as the site of the ancestor. The South, in a state of redefinition following the Civil Rights Movement, provides a fluid space where values of community and individualism relative to identity can be reconciled through the return migrant's connection to that space
Suicide or Messianic self-sacrifice? : exhuming Willa's body in Gloria Naylor's "Linden Hills" by Christopher N Okonkwo( )

1 edition published in 2001 in English and held by 1 WorldCat member library worldwide

 
Audience Level
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Audience Level
1
  Kids General Special  
Audience level: 0.51 (from 0.50 for A spirit o ... to 0.97 for Suicide or ...)

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A spirit of dialogue : incarnations of Ợgbañje, the born-to-die, in African American literature
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